Suzanne Hosie

Suzanne Hosie

RMIT University

H-index: 9

Oceania-Australia

About Suzanne Hosie

Suzanne Hosie, With an exceptional h-index of 9 and a recent h-index of 8 (since 2020), a distinguished researcher at RMIT University, specializes in the field of Neuroscience.

His recent articles reflect a diverse array of research interests and contributions to the field:

Faster Gastrointestinal Transit, Reduced Small Intestinal Smooth Muscle Tone and Dysmotility in the Nlgn3R451C Mouse Model of Autism

GutMap: A New Interface for Analysing Regional Motility Patterns in ex vivo Mouse Gastrointestinal Preparations

Issues for patchy tissues: Defining roles for gut-associated lymphoid tissue in neurodevelopment and disease

The Emerging Role of the Gut–Brain–Microbiota Axis in Neurodevelopmental Disorders

Comparing the gut microbiome in autism and preclinical models: a systematic review

Interactions of the Gut Nervous System with Bacteria

Altered Interactions Caecal in the Neuroimmune Neuroligin-3R451C Mouse Model of Autism

The role of the gastrointestinal mucus system in intestinal homeostasis: implications for neurological disorders

Suzanne Hosie Information

University

RMIT University

Position

___

Citations(all)

601

Citations(since 2020)

395

Cited By

288

hIndex(all)

9

hIndex(since 2020)

8

i10Index(all)

9

i10Index(since 2020)

7

Email

University Profile Page

RMIT University

Suzanne Hosie Skills & Research Interests

Neuroscience

Top articles of Suzanne Hosie

Faster Gastrointestinal Transit, Reduced Small Intestinal Smooth Muscle Tone and Dysmotility in the Nlgn3R451C Mouse Model of Autism

Authors

Suzanne Hosie,Tanya Abo-Shaban,Kevin Mou,Gayathri K Balasuriya,Mitra Mohsenipour,Mohammed U Alamoudi,Rhiannon T Filippone,Gabrielle T Belz,Ashley E Franks,Joel C Bornstein,Kulmira Nurgali,Elisa L Hill-Yardin

Journal

International Journal of Molecular Sciences

Published Date

2024/1/9

Individuals with autism often experience gastrointestinal issues but the cause is unknown. Many gene mutations that modify neuronal synapse function are associated with autism and therefore may impact the enteric nervous system that regulates gastrointestinal function. A missense mutation in the Nlgn3 gene encoding the cell adhesion protein Neuroligin-3 was identified in two brothers with autism who both experienced severe gastrointestinal dysfunction. Mice expressing this mutation (Nlgn3R451C mice) are a well-studied preclinical model of autism and show autism-relevant characteristics, including impaired social interaction and communication, as well as repetitive behaviour. We previously showed colonic dysmotility in response to GABAergic inhibition and increased myenteric neuronal numbers in the small intestine in Nlgn3R451C mice bred on a mixed genetic background. Here, we show that gut dysfunction is a persistent phenotype of the Nlgn3 R451C mutation in mice backcrossed onto a C57BL/6 background. We report that Nlgn3R451C mice show a 30.9% faster gastrointestinal transit (p = 0.0004) in vivo and have 6% longer small intestines (p = 0.04) compared to wild-types due to a reduction in smooth muscle tone. In Nlgn3R451C mice, we observed a decrease in resting jejunal diameter (proximal jejunum: 10.6% decrease, p = 0.02; mid: 9.8%, p = 0.04; distal: 11.5%, p = 0.009) and neurally regulated dysmotility as well as shorter durations of contractile complexes (mid: 25.6% reduction in duration, p = 0.009; distal: 30.5%, p = 0.004) in the ileum. In Nlgn3R451C mouse colons, short contractions were inhibited to a greater extent …

GutMap: A New Interface for Analysing Regional Motility Patterns in ex vivo Mouse Gastrointestinal Preparations

Authors

Tanya Abo-Shaban,Chalystha YQ Lee,Suzanne Hosie,Gayathri K Balasuriya,Mitra Mohsenipour,Leigh A Johnston,Elisa L Hill-Yardin

Journal

Bio-protocol

Published Date

2023/10/10

Different regions of the gastrointestinal tract have specific functions and thus distinct motility patterns. Motility is primarily regulated by the enteric nervous system (ENS), an intrinsic network of neurons located within the gut wall. Under physiological conditions, the ENS is influenced by the central nervous system (CNS). However, by using ex vivo organ bath experiments, ENS regulation of gut motility can also be studied in the absence of CNS influences. The current technique enables the characterisation of small intestinal, caecal, and colonic motility patterns using an ex vivo organ bath and video imaging protocol. This approach is combined with the novel edge detection script GutMap, available in MATLAB, that functions across Windows and Mac platforms. Dissected intestinal segments are cannulated in an organ bath containing physiological saline with a camera mounted overhead. Video recordings of gut …

Issues for patchy tissues: Defining roles for gut-associated lymphoid tissue in neurodevelopment and disease

Authors

T Abo-Shaban,SS Sharna,S Hosie,CYQ Lee,GK Balasuriya,SJ McKeown,AE Franks,EL Hill-Yardin

Published Date

2023/3

Individuals diagnosed with neurodevelopmental conditions such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD; autism) often experience tissue inflammation as well as gastrointestinal dysfunction, yet their underlying causes remain poorly characterised. Notably, the largest components of the body’s immune system, including gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), lie within the gastrointestinal tract. A major constituent of GALT in humans comprises secretory lymphoid aggregates known as Peyer’s patches that sense and combat constant exposure to pathogens and infectious agents. Essential to the functions of Peyer’s patches is its communication with the enteric nervous system (ENS), an intrinsic neural network that regulates gastrointestinal function. Crosstalk between these tissues contribute to the microbiota-gut-brain axis that altogether influences mood and behaviour. Increasing evidence further points to a critical role …

The Emerging Role of the Gut–Brain–Microbiota Axis in Neurodevelopmental Disorders

Authors

S Hosie,T Abo-Shaban,CYQ Lee,SM Matta,A Shindler,R Gore,SS Sharna,M Herath,PJ Crack,AE Franks,EL Hill-Yardin

Published Date

2023/1/1

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD; autism) is a prevalent neurodevelopmental disorder associated with changes in gut-brain axis communication. Gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms are experienced by a large proportion of individuals diagnosed with autism. Several mutations associated with autism modify cellular communication via neuronal synapses. It has been suggested that modifications to the enteric nervous system, an intrinsic nervous system of the GI tract, could contribute to GI dysfunction. Changes in gut motility, permeability, and the mucosal barrier as well as shifts in the large population of microbes inhabiting the GI tract could contribute to GI symptoms. Preclinical research has demonstrated that mice expressing the well-studied R451C missense mutation in Nlgn3 gene, which encodes cell adhesion protein neuroligin-3 at neuronal synapses, exhibit GI dysfunction. Specifically, NL3R451C mice show altered …

Comparing the gut microbiome in autism and preclinical models: a systematic review

Authors

Mohammed U Alamoudi,Suzanne Hosie,Anya E Shindler,Jennifer L Wood,Ashley E Franks,Elisa L Hill-Yardin

Published Date

2022/7/1

Many individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) experience gastrointestinal (GI) dysfunction and show microbial dysbiosis. Variation in gut microbial populations is associated with increased risk for GI symptoms such as chronic constipation and diarrhoea, which decrease quality of life. Several preclinical models of autism also demonstrate microbial dysbiosis. Given that much pre-clinical research is conducted in mouse models, it is important to understand the similarities and differences between the gut microbiome in humans and these models in the context of autism. We conducted a systematic review of the literature using PubMed, ProQuest and Scopus databases to compare microbiome profiles of patients with autism and transgenic (NL3R451C, Shank3 KO, 15q dup), phenotype-first (BTBR) and environmental (Poly I:C, Maternal Inflammation Activation (MIA), valproate) mouse models of autism. Overall, we report changes in fecal microbial communities relevant to ASD based on both clinical and preclinical studies. Here, we identify an overlapping cluster of genera that are modified in both fecal samples from individuals with ASD and mouse models of autism. Specifically, we describe an increased abundance of Bilophila, Clostridium, Dorea and Lactobacillus and a decrease in Blautia genera in both humans and rodents relevant to this disorder. Studies in both humans and mice highlighted multidirectional changes in abundance (i.e. in some cases increased abundance whereas other reports showed decreases) for several genera including Akkermansia, Bacteroides, Bifidobacterium, Parabacteroides and Prevotella …

Interactions of the Gut Nervous System with Bacteria

Authors

Chalystha Yie Qin Lee,Suzanne Hosie,Ashley E Franks,Elisa L Hill-Yardin

Published Date

2022

The gut–brain axis refers to the bidirectional communication between the brain and the enteric nervous system (ENS) in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Tightly regulated interactions between these two components are crucial for maintaining physiological gut homeostasis. The ENS also sends neurochemical signals to modulate immune function within the GI tract. The presence of the gut microbiome adds another dimension of complexity to this relationship. Trillions of microbes that collectively make up the microbiome interact with neurons, both in the brain and the ENS, to affect behavior and gut function in health and disease. Due to its close proximity, the ENS is a critical component of the interface between the nervous system of the host and bacteria. Recent microbiome studies point toward the occurrence of dysbiosis in many neurological disorders. To understand the changes in gut–brain axis function in these …

Altered Interactions Caecal in the Neuroimmune Neuroligin-3R451C Mouse Model of Autism

Authors

Samiha Sayed Sharna,Gayathri K Balasuriya,Suzanne Hosie,Jess Nithianantharajah,Ashley E Franks,Elisa L Hill-Yardin

Journal

Interactions of the Nervous System with Bacteria

Published Date

2021/6/24

The intrinsic nervous system of the gut interacts with the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) via bidirectional neuroimmune interactions. The caecum is an understudied region of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract that houses a large supply of microbes and is involved in generating immune responses. The caecal patch is a lymphoid aggregate located within the caecum that regulates microbial content and immune responses. People with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD; autism) experience serious GI dysfunction, including inflammatory disorders, more frequently than the general population. Autism is a highly prevalent neurodevelopmental disorder defined by the presence of repetitive behavior or restricted interests, language impairment, and social deficits. Mutations in genes encoding synaptic adhesion proteins such as the R451C missense mutation in neuroligin-3 (NL3) are associated with autism and impair synaptic transmission. We previously reported that NL3R451C mice, a well-established model of autism, have altered enteric neurons and GI dysfunction; however, whether the autism-associated R451C mutation alters the caecal enteric nervous system and immune function is unknown. We assessed for gross anatomical changes in the caecum and quantified the proportions of caecal submucosal and myenteric neurons in wild-type and NL3R451C mice using immunofluorescence. In the caecal patch, we assessed total cellular density as well as the density and morphology of Iba-1 labeled macrophages to identify whether the R451C mutation affects neuro-immune interactions. NL3R451C mice have significantly reduced caecal weight …

The role of the gastrointestinal mucus system in intestinal homeostasis: implications for neurological disorders

Authors

Madushani Herath,Suzanne Hosie,Joel C Bornstein,Ashley E Franks,Elisa L Hill-Yardin

Published Date

2020/5/28

Mucus is integral to gut health and its properties may be affected in neurological disease. The mucus lining of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract plays a prominent role in physically preventing microbial content reaching the intestinal epithelium. Multiple factors influence the volume, viscosity, porosity and microbial content of mucus in the GI tract, including the proliferation of mucus-secreting goblet cells from stem cells located at the base of GI crypts. Via a number of mechanisms, abnormalities in neuronal networks occurring in neurological disorders may alter the structure and function of mucus in patients. The gut has its own intrinsic neuronal network, the enteric nervous system, which extends the length of the GI tract and innervates the mucosal epithelium. The GI tract and commensal microbiota influence mood and behavior via neural and non-neural pathways within the gut-brain axis. Both dysbiosis and gut dysfunction are commonly reported in several neurological disorders such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease as well in patients with neurodevelopmental disorders including autism. Since some microbes use mucus as a prominent energy source, changes in mucus properties could alter, and even exacerbate, dysbiosis-related gut symptoms in neurological disorders. This review summarizes existing knowledge of the structure and function of the mucus of the GI tract and highlights areas to be addressed in future research to better understand how intestinal homeostasis is impacted in neurological disorders.

Altered Caecal Neuroimmune Interactions in the Neuroligin-3R451C Mouse Model of Autism

Authors

Samiha Sayed Sharna,Gayathri K Balasuriya,Suzanne Hosie,Jess Nithianantharajah,Ashley E Franks,Elisa L Hill-Yardin

Journal

Frontiers in cellular neuroscience

Published Date

2020/4/9

The intrinsic nervous system of the gut interacts with the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) via bidirectional neuroimmune interactions. The caecum is an understudied region of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract that houses a large supply of microbes and is involved in generating immune responses. The caecal patch is a lymphoid aggregate located within the caecum that regulates microbial content and immune responses. People with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD; autism) experience serious GI dysfunction, including inflammatory disorders, more frequently than the general population. Autism is a highly prevalent neurodevelopmental disorder defined by the presence of repetitive behavior or restricted interests, language impairment, and social deficits. Mutations in genes encoding synaptic adhesion proteins such as the R451C missense mutation in neuroligin-3 (NL3) are associated with autism and impair synaptic transmission. We previously reported that NL3R451C mice, a well-established model of autism, have altered enteric neurons and GI dysfunction; however, whether the autism-associated R451C mutation alters the caecal enteric nervous system and immune function is unknown. We assessed for gross anatomical changes in the caecum and quantified the proportions of caecal submucosal and myenteric neurons in wild-type and NL3R451C mice using immunofluorescence. In the caecal patch, we assessed total cellular density as well as the density and morphology of Iba-1 labeled macrophages to identify whether the R451C mutation affects neuro-immune interactions. NL3R451C mice have significantly reduced caecal weight …

See List of Professors in Suzanne Hosie University(RMIT University)

Suzanne Hosie FAQs

What is Suzanne Hosie's h-index at RMIT University?

The h-index of Suzanne Hosie has been 8 since 2020 and 9 in total.

What are Suzanne Hosie's top articles?

The articles with the titles of

Faster Gastrointestinal Transit, Reduced Small Intestinal Smooth Muscle Tone and Dysmotility in the Nlgn3R451C Mouse Model of Autism

GutMap: A New Interface for Analysing Regional Motility Patterns in ex vivo Mouse Gastrointestinal Preparations

Issues for patchy tissues: Defining roles for gut-associated lymphoid tissue in neurodevelopment and disease

The Emerging Role of the Gut–Brain–Microbiota Axis in Neurodevelopmental Disorders

Comparing the gut microbiome in autism and preclinical models: a systematic review

Interactions of the Gut Nervous System with Bacteria

Altered Interactions Caecal in the Neuroimmune Neuroligin-3R451C Mouse Model of Autism

The role of the gastrointestinal mucus system in intestinal homeostasis: implications for neurological disorders

...

are the top articles of Suzanne Hosie at RMIT University.

What are Suzanne Hosie's research interests?

The research interests of Suzanne Hosie are: Neuroscience

What is Suzanne Hosie's total number of citations?

Suzanne Hosie has 601 citations in total.

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