Nadia Kellam

Nadia Kellam

Arizona State University

H-index: 19

North America-United States

About Nadia Kellam

Nadia Kellam, With an exceptional h-index of 19 and a recent h-index of 17 (since 2020), a distinguished researcher at Arizona State University, specializes in the field of Engineering Education, Narrativde Research.

His recent articles reflect a diverse array of research interests and contributions to the field:

Narrative Smoothing in the Wild: A Pack Based Approach to Co-Constructing Narratives for Analysis

The TRIPLE Change Framework: Merging Theories of Intersectional Power, Learning, and Change to Enable Just, Equitable, Diverse, and Inclusive Engineering Education

Ethiopian Women Students’ Recommendations for Enhancing Their Sense of Belonging in Engineering Education

Exploring composite narratives as a methodology to understand and share research findings in engineering education

Integrating Teacher Empathy into the Engineering Classroom one Educator at a Time: An Action Research Study

The consequential agency of faculty seeking to make departmental change

The ASU-DCU International Research and Workforce Development Program on Sensors and Machine Learning

Conclusion and Lessons Learned

Nadia Kellam Information

University

Arizona State University

Position

Associate Professor of Engineering

Citations(all)

2317

Citations(since 2020)

1485

Cited By

1300

hIndex(all)

19

hIndex(since 2020)

17

i10Index(all)

31

i10Index(since 2020)

21

Email

University Profile Page

Arizona State University

Nadia Kellam Skills & Research Interests

Engineering Education

Narrativde Research

Top articles of Nadia Kellam

Narrative Smoothing in the Wild: A Pack Based Approach to Co-Constructing Narratives for Analysis

Authors

Brooke Coley,Nadia Kellam,Debalina Maitra,Audrey Boklage

Journal

International Journal of Qualitative Methods

Published Date

2024/1/20

This methodology paper introduces a collective, team-based approach to constructing narratives in narrative research. The goal of the larger study was to explore the pedagogical belief and practices of engineering faculty members. The newly formed team of researchers ranged from novices to experts in the field of qualitative research, and this space created a unique opportunity to reflect on and explore the co-construction of Cody’s narrative, the first narrative that the team constructed. The narrative was smoothed and constructed in a way that reduces some of the limitations inherent in narrative smoothing, through a deliberate and intentional negotiation process. We hope that this deeper exploration of our methods is helpful for other narrative researchers who are interested in team-based approaches to co-construction of narratives.

The TRIPLE Change Framework: Merging Theories of Intersectional Power, Learning, and Change to Enable Just, Equitable, Diverse, and Inclusive Engineering Education

Authors

Vanessa Svihla,Susannah C Davis,Nadia N Kellam

Published Date

2023/9/11

Background: Despite many calls for change, and especially change aligned to diversity, equity, inclusion, and justice (DEIJ) goals, engineering continues to show disparities in the opportunities, experiences, and outcomes of women and people from groups historically marginalized in these fields. In response, institutions have traditionally used change frameworks to both understand and create reform at program, department, or college levels. However, when aiming at DEIJ goals, change frameworks alone do not lead to the desired transformations of systems.Purpose: In this theoretical paper, we develop an integrated framework that draws from three theoretical domains to guide systemic, equity-focused transformation in engineering education. We argue knowledge from three domains—intersectional power, learning, and change—is necessary to account for and address the complexity of DEIJ change projects …

Ethiopian Women Students’ Recommendations for Enhancing Their Sense of Belonging in Engineering Education

Authors

Jemal Bedane Halkiyo,Madeleine Jennings,Sultan Bedane Halkiyu,Nadia N Kellam

Published Date

2023/6/25

It is well understood across diverse cultures and disciplines that students' well-developed sense of belonging is vital to their academic success, persistence, and satisfaction in their major and learning environments. Ethiopia’s Ministry of Education (MOE) has developed initiatives to educate the next generation of engineers, however, these initiatives can sometimes neglect the facilitation of inclusive environments in engineering. This qualitative study utilizes interviews with four Ethiopian women who were studying engineering in Ethiopian universities to explore how they felt their institutions could support them in developing and improving their sense of belonging in engineering. Our research question guiding this study is the following: How, according to Ethiopian women engineering students, could their sense of belonging be enhanced? What could the engineering school and university do to improve these women students’ sense of belonging, according to the students? We collected data using narrative interviews, analyzed data using a thematic approach, and used a ‘sense of belonging’lens to guide the overall study. The findings center Ethiopian women students’ advice and recommendations to their colleges and universities for improving women’s sense of belonging in engineering education, which includes providing additional academic support for women, covering practical aspects of the engineering curricula (not just theories), creating a safe learning environment (eg, practicing “strict” sexual harassment policy, ensuring reliable campus safety and security, building separate libraries for women), providing a well-equipped learning …

Exploring composite narratives as a methodology to understand and share research findings in engineering education

Authors

Susan Sajadi,Nadia N Kellam,Samantha Ruth Brunhaver

Published Date

2023/6/25

In this methods paper, the development and utility of composite narratives will be explored. Composite narratives, which involve combining aspects of multiple interviews into a single narrative, are a relatively modern methodology used in the qualitative research literature for several purposes: to do justice to complex accounts while maintaining participant anonymity, summarize data in a more engaging personal form and retain the human face of the data, illustrate specific aspects of the research findings, enhance the transferability of research findings by invoking empathy, illuminate collective experiences, and enhance research impact by providing findings in a manner more accessible to those outside of academia. Composite narratives leverage the power of storytelling, which has shown to be effective in studies of neurology and psychology; ie, since humans often think and process information in narrative structures, the information conveyed in story form can be imprinted more easily on readers’ minds or existing schema. Engineering education researchers have increasingly begun using narrative research methods. Recently, researchers have begun exploring composite narratives as an approach to enable more complex and nuanced understandings of engineering education while mitigating potential issues around the confidentiality of participants. Because this is a relatively new methodology in higher education more broadly and in engineering education specifically, more examples of how to construct and utilize composite narratives in both research and practice are needed. This paper will share how we created a composite narrative …

Integrating Teacher Empathy into the Engineering Classroom one Educator at a Time: An Action Research Study

Authors

Bala Vignesh Sundaram,Nadia Kellam

Published Date

2022/8/23

In this research paper, we explore the journey of one engineering faculty while integrating best practices from research on teacher empathy in their classroom. Teacher empathy is a term used in multiple fields of study, including higher education, nursing, and medicine, to refer to the empathetic skills of teachers. This body of research generally shows that better teacher empathy helps in improving students’ learning experience, satisfaction, and overall performance. The purpose of this study is to explore the story of how one engineering faculty member integrates teacher empathy into their course, including motivations, barriers, difficulties faced, and benefits to becoming more empathetic in the classroom. The model of empathy framework developed by Walther and colleagues was used to frame our study on teacher empathy [1]. We used Action Research (AR) methodology for this study as AR allows the researcher to work with the participant instead of on the participant. In this study, we were part of a teaching team for an Engineering Mechanics class. In two pre-study interviews, we discussed the meaning of teacher empathy and the participant decided on specific empathetic actions to implement in their course. We collected after-class audio reflective journaling and three 1-hour interviews (spread evenly across the semester) as the data. We used a qualitative data analysis approach, primarily utilizing inductive coding and thematic coding to arrive at our findings. Over the course of the semester, the faculty’s use of empathy in the classroom increased. Positive feedback from the students during class and in regular student evaluations of the class …

The consequential agency of faculty seeking to make departmental change

Authors

Vanessa Svihla,Nadia Kellam,Susannah Davis

Published Date

2022/8/23

Over the past decade, much attention has focused on change-making efforts, especially those funded by the NSF Revolutionizing Engineering Departments program. We bring together theory on agency and intersectional power to investigate a research question:• How and over what/whom do faculty engaged in departmental change efforts express agency, with attention to structural, cultural, normative, and interpersonal power relations? We draw upon recordings of faculty meetings and interviews across multiple change teams and years to characterize consequential change agency. Analysis of these highlights how accounts of contentious events reveals power dynamics at play, and ways those in power prevent or promote change. We argue that key elements of change agency include meeting others where they are, sharing agency with them (“we”), using potential control verbs (can, could, might, etc.), acknowledging their concerns, and inviting them into the effort in ways that suggest ownership.

The ASU-DCU International Research and Workforce Development Program on Sensors and Machine Learning

Authors

Andreas Spanias,Vivek Narayanaswamy,Erica Forzani,Greg Raupp,Nadia Kellam,Megan O’Donnell,Wendy Barnard,Jean Larson,Noel O’Connor,Nicholas Dunne,Stephen Daniels,Suzanne Little

Published Date

2022/7/18

The Arizona State University (ASU) - Dublin City University (DCU) International Research Experiences for Students (IRES) project is a summer workforce development program that embeds students in machine learning and sensor research. This collaborative IRES program, funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), engages faculty mentors from the Sensor, Signal, Information Processing (SenSIP) Center at ASU, and the Insight SFI Research Centre for Data Analytics and Biodesign Europe at DCU to train students in sensor design, analytics, and machine learning algorithm development. Sensor and machine learning research addresses engineering and computing problems in health care and other related applications. IRES participants are tasked with studying hardware, algorithms and software for various tasks including activity detection, gait modeling, imaging, hemochromatosis prediction, and health …

Conclusion and Lessons Learned

Authors

Nadia Kellam

Published Date

2022/5/31

I hope you have enjoyed reading these stories of engineering faculty and their diverse stories of embracing active learning strategies. To me, these stories highlight the complexities inherent in stories of change. Of these eight stories, there was not a single one that was simple and straightforward. This was part of the impetus for sharing these stories as people are not born good teachers; it requires work to become good teachers. While these stories show the difficulties in becoming exemplary engineering educators, they also highlight the benefits of changing our ways of teaching.

Qualitative engineering education researchers and our relationships with data: Exploring our epistemologies and values as a community

Authors

Nadia Kellam,Madeleine Jennings

Published Date

2022/8/23

In this research paper, we will continue to develop an understanding of our epistemologies and values of our qualitative engineering education research community through an analysis of relationships with our data in recently published articles. Qualitative research has become more commonplace and valued in engineering education in recent years. However, some tensions are apparent within qualitative research as some people within our community (researchers and consumers of our research) are more positivist leaning while others embrace more constructivist, postmodern, and critical ways of engaging as researchers. The purpose of this paper is to consider some of these tensions in our community through considering researchers relationships and use of data in journal publications. The research question guiding this study was: Through an analysis of qualitative, engineering education manuscripts published in 2019, what is our relationship with data and what might this tell us about our values and epistemologies?

Authors’ Biographies (in order of appearance)

Authors

NADIA KELLAM

Journal

Transformative Teaching: A Collection of Stories of Engineering Faculty's Pedagogical Journeys

Published Date

2022/5/31

Nadia Kellam is an Associate Professor in the Polytechnic School of the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering at Arizona State University. She is a qualitative researcher who primarily uses narrative research methods. In her research, Dr. Kellam is broadly interested in developing critical understandings of the culture of engineering education and, especially, the experiences of underrepresented undergraduate engineering students and engineering educators. In addition to teaching undergraduate engineering courses and a graduate course on entrepreneurship, she also enjoys teaching qualitative research methods in engineering education in the Engineering Education Systems and Design Ph. D. program at ASU. Nadia serves as Deputy Editor of the Journal of Engineering Education.

Understanding the perspectives of empathy among engineering faculty members

Authors

Bala Vignesh Sundaram,Nadia N Kellam,Shawn S Jordan

Published Date

2021/7/26

In higher education, studies have shown that teacher empathy can lead to better student learning outcomes, diverse and inclusive learning environments, as well as less teacher burnout. In engineering education, research on empathy has recently gained significant interest and most of this research is focused on developing and fostering empathy among engineering students. Teacher empathy is a relatively new direction yet to be taken in engineering education. In this study, we are interested in developing a preliminary understanding of the views about teacher empathy among engineering faculty. The research question that guides this work is, how do engineering faculty members define, understand, and value teacher empathy? We used the Model of Empathy Framework [1] as a lens to understand the perspectives of the faculty members. While the framework is developed specifically to understand various attributes of empathy among engineers and engineering students, we used this framework to better understand empathy among engineering educators. The framework is made up of three mutually dependent dimensions: skills, orientation, and being. The skills dimension includes empathic skills that can be learned such as perspective taking, mode switching, and affective sharing. The orientation dimension concerns one’s proclivity for being empathetic and includes aspects such as an epistemological openness and reflective values awareness. The being dimension aligns with one’s values and morals as engineers and citizens and how these morals and values define and guide our actions and behaviors. Interviews were conducted with …

Uncovering epistemologies and values of our qualitative engineering education research community: Listening for voices

Authors

Nadia Kellam,Madeleine Jennings

Journal

Studies in Engineering Education

Published Date

2021/12

Background: In engineering education research, we have made great strides in both our advanced qualitative research methodologies and the acceptance of qualitative research within the broader field. This shift in our community likely marks a shift in our epistemologies and a shift in our values, but we are still feeling a pull towards positivist epistemologies from funding agencies, journals, editorial boards, reviewers, and readers, which may be limiting our potential to conduct more critical and postmodern research and learn more about communities who are marginalized in engineering.Purpose: The purpose of this research project is to develop an understanding of qualitative researchers’ epistemological perspectives and values. The research question guiding this study is: Through an analysis of qualitative engineering education manuscripts published in 2019, what voices of researchers and participants appear in our work and what do they reveal about our EER community’s epistemologies and values? Method: The databases Engineering Village and Google Scholar were employed to identify journal articles that are qualitative, engineering education–focused, and published in 2019. This search resulted in 27 journal articles from eleven journals that served as the data for this project. The analysis was derived from discourse analysis and The Listening Guide and involved multiple readings. During these readings, we considered how the epistemologies present in qualitative engineering education research were reflected through a discursive examination of voices that emerged in the papers.Conclusions: Researcher and participant voices …

Powerful change attends to power relations

Authors

S Davis,N Kellam,Vanessa Svihla,Bala Vignesh Sundaram,J Kalkiyo

Journal

2021 ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition

Published Date

2021/1

While changing engineering departments to become more inclusive and equitable is a common goal, research repeatedly confirms that such change is rare. Notably, change efforts commonly fail in higher education institutions (Kezar 2011), and this failure is typically attributed to faculty resistance, ineffective leadership, competing values, and conservative traditions (Klempin and Karp 2018). Recent nationwide National Science Foundation-funded efforts to revolutionize engineering departments provide insight into the salience of power dynamics as drivers of or barriers to equitable, lasting change. We interviewed members of these change teams to understand the challenges they encountered and how they navigated these. Using an intersectionality framework (Collins & Bilge, 2016) we explored four lenses on power relations: (1) from a structural lens, we see that policies may affect individuals differently based on their social and role identities; (2) from a cultural lens, ideas and culture organize power, often blinding those with privilege from noticing bias; (3) from a disciplinary lens, people train and coerce each other to behave in certain ways and to sustain norms; and (4) from an interpersonal lens, we see that an individual’s social (e.g., gender, ethnicity) and role (career, position, voluntary memberships) identities can shape how they experience bias. Using these lenses, we characterized ways members positioned themselves in relation to change efforts and the degree to which they held substantive power or were endangered through their participation. In many cases, disciplinary norms revealed clashes between the original structures and …

Students’ implicit epistemologies when working at the intersection of engineering and the arts

Authors

Joshua Cruz,Noa Bruhis,Nadia Kellam,Suren Jayasuriya

Journal

International Journal of STEM Education

Published Date

2021/12

Background This paper explores the epistemologies and discourse of undergraduate students at the transdisciplinary intersection of engineering and the arts. Our research questions focus on the kinds of knowledge that students value, use, and identify within an interdisciplinary digital media program, as well as how they talk about using these epistemologies while navigating this transdisciplinary intersection. Six interviews were conducted with students pursuing a semester-long senior capstone project in the digital culture undergraduate degree program in the School of Arts, Media and Engineering at Arizona State University that emphasizes the intersection between arts, media, and engineering. Results Using deductive coding followed by discourse analysis, a variety of student epistemologies including positivism, constructionism, and pragmatism …

Using power, privilege, and intersectionality as lenses to understand our experiences and begin to disrupt and dismantle oppressive structures within academia

Authors

N Kellam,S Davis,V Svihla

Journal

Proceedings of CoNECD

Published Date

2021/1

Many of us are working to create a more inclusive and socially just culture within engineering education and engineering. Despite significant effort, marginalization and discrimination continue, buoyed by systems of oppression. How can we disrupt and dismantle oppressive systems? In our work, we (throughout this paper, we refers to Nadia, Vanessa, and Susannah) explore how power and privilege are enacted within leadership teams that aim to create revolutionary changes within engineering departments. Based on this work, we developed the POWER protocol (Privilege and Oppression: Working for Equitable Recourse), a workshop that guides engineering educators to identify and understand the intersectional nature of power and privilege before planning strategies to disrupt, disarm, and dismantle it. In this paper, we present a design case to show how this workshop has evolved. We provide the POWER protocol in the appendix so that others can adapt this workshop for their own contexts.In the interactive session at CoNECD, we will take attendees through part of the POWER protocol (we will scope the workshop to fit in the time allotted; the full workshop is 1.5 hours) to examine how power, privilege, and intersectionality can help attendees frame their experiences and begin to understand how their everyday experiences may be influenced by systemic oppression. To guide this process, we orient around the question: How can we become aware of power and privilege on collaborative academic teams in order to better affect social change and improve interdisciplinary and cross-identity/boundary interactions, communication, and …

Zen and the art of STEAM: Student knowledge and experiences in interdisciplinary and traditional engineering capstone experiences

Authors

Dominique Dredd,Nadia Kellam,Suren Jayasuriya

Published Date

2021/10/13

This Research Full Paper examines the concept of flow, derived from Zen philosophy and positive psychology, and how interdisciplinary STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics) and disciplinary electrical engineering students find flow within their coursework and their capstone design experiences. STEAM education incorporates the arts and humanities into the traditional disciplines of STEM. However, students involved in this interdisciplinary space often struggle to find a balance in applying both creative and logical knowledge in their work. The theoretical framework for this study leverages the concept of pure experience from Zen philosophy to analyze flow states in students' interdisciplinary experiences. This theory focuses on the unity of subject/object and rejection of purely logical, positivist thinking for more integrative knowledge acquisition while in flow states. In this secondary …

Using power, privilege, and intersectionality to understand, disrupt, and dismantle oppressive structures within academia: A design case

Authors

Nadia Kellam,Vanessa Svihla,Susannah C Davis,Susan Sajadi,Jasmine Desiderio

Journal

CoNECD Conference

Published Date

2021/1

Many of us are working to create a more inclusive and socially just culture within engineering education and engineering. Despite significant effort, marginalization and discrimination continue, buoyed by systems of oppression. How can we disrupt and dismantle oppressive systems in engineering education? In our work, we explore how power and privilege are enacted within leadership teams that aim to create revolutionary changes within engineering departments. Based on this work, we developed the POWER protocol (Privilege and Oppression: Working for Equitable Recourse), a workshop that guides engineering educators to identify and understand the intersectional nature of power and privilege before planning strategies to disrupt, disarm, and dismantle it. In this paper, we present a design case to show how this workshop has evolved. We provide the POWER protocol in the appendix so that others can adapt this workshop for their own contexts. In the interactive session at CoNECD, we will take attendees through part of the POWER protocol (we will scope the workshop to fit in the time allotted; the full workshop is 1.5 hours) to examine how power, privilege, and intersectionality can help attendees frame their experiences and begin to understand how their everyday experiences may be influenced by systemic oppression. To guide this process, we orient around the question: How can we become aware of power and privilege on collaborative academic teams in order to better affect social change and improve interdisciplinary and cross-identity/boundary interactions, communication, and inclusivity? We hope that through interactive …

Use of AI-Generated Visual Media in Interviews to Understand Power Differentials in Gender, Romantic, and Sexual Minority Students

Authors

Madeleine Jennings,Jorge Sandoval,Jeanne Sanders,Mirka Koro,Nadia Kellam,Suren Jayasuriya

Published Date

2021/10/13

This work-in-progress briefly outlines the theoretical background, methods, and preliminary results of a qualitative study conducted with gender, romantic, and sexual minority (GRSM) students immersed in higher education spaces. We elaborate on the efficacy of our innovative qualitative methodologies through the use of AI-human art-making interactions during our interviews, which helped to produce richer qualitative data from our participants. Our methodology was constructed using a Foucauldian theoretical framework to inform the framework of this study, focusing explicitly on GRSM students' experiences with power in higher education and when using technology, as well as the ways in which they resist power through the use of technology and AI -generated visual media.

The POWER Special Session: Building Awareness of Power and Privilege on Intersectional Teams

Authors

Nadia Kellam,Vanessa Svihla,Susannah Davis

Published Date

2020/10/21

We (the facilitators) work as social scientists and engineering education researchers from different universities on the NSF-supported program, Revolutionizing Engineering Departments (RED) ( https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2017/nsf17501/nsf17501.htm ). We began to notice how power and privilege were enacted on our teams, which consisted of diverse team members (e.g., diverse in disciplinary affiliation, role in the university, gender, race, LGBTQIA+ status). This motivated a research project and workshops/special sessions such as the one proposed here, where we explore how power and privilege are enacted within interdisciplinary teams so that we can begin to dismantle systemic oppressions within academia [1] , [2] . The POWER special session (Privilege and Oppression: Working for Equitable Recourse) was developed to guide engineering educators to identify and understand the intersectional nature of …

A review of the state of LGBTQIA+ student research in STEM and engineering education

Authors

Madeleine Jennings,Rod Roscoe,Nadia Kellam,Suren Jayasuriya

Published Date

2020/1

The purpose of this critical literature review was to generate awareness of the LGBTQIA+ engineering student experience and research on this community, while also highlighting areas that are lacking or receiving insufficient attention. This work is part of a larger project that aims to review engineering education research with respect to LGBTQIA+ students, higher education faculty and staff, and industry professionals. This literature review was conducted in two phases. First, works from non-engineering disciplines were reviewed to identify popular threads and major areas of research on the LGBTQIA+ student experience. This phase was not an exhaustive review; rather, it was meant to establish specific themes of importance derived from the larger body of literature on the LGBTQIA+ student experience. Second, a literature review identified how engineering-specific research on the LGBTQIA+ student experience aligned with these themes. We identified several themes in the first phase of the literature review: (1) Climate, (2) LGB Monolith, (3) Intersectionality, and (4) Identity Development. Engineering and engineering education literature demonstrated similar themes, although this body of work was unique in the exploration of LGBTQIA+ coping strategies and the use of the technical/social dualism framework. Overall, the engineering education literature on LGBTQIA+ student experiences seemed relatively underdeveloped.

See List of Professors in Nadia Kellam University(Arizona State University)

Nadia Kellam FAQs

What is Nadia Kellam's h-index at Arizona State University?

The h-index of Nadia Kellam has been 17 since 2020 and 19 in total.

What are Nadia Kellam's top articles?

The articles with the titles of

Narrative Smoothing in the Wild: A Pack Based Approach to Co-Constructing Narratives for Analysis

The TRIPLE Change Framework: Merging Theories of Intersectional Power, Learning, and Change to Enable Just, Equitable, Diverse, and Inclusive Engineering Education

Ethiopian Women Students’ Recommendations for Enhancing Their Sense of Belonging in Engineering Education

Exploring composite narratives as a methodology to understand and share research findings in engineering education

Integrating Teacher Empathy into the Engineering Classroom one Educator at a Time: An Action Research Study

The consequential agency of faculty seeking to make departmental change

The ASU-DCU International Research and Workforce Development Program on Sensors and Machine Learning

Conclusion and Lessons Learned

...

are the top articles of Nadia Kellam at Arizona State University.

What are Nadia Kellam's research interests?

The research interests of Nadia Kellam are: Engineering Education, Narrativde Research

What is Nadia Kellam's total number of citations?

Nadia Kellam has 2,317 citations in total.

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