David Wilson

David Wilson

James Cook University

H-index: 25

Oceania-Australia

About David Wilson

David Wilson, With an exceptional h-index of 25 and a recent h-index of 19 (since 2020), a distinguished researcher at James Cook University, specializes in the field of Venom.

His recent articles reflect a diverse array of research interests and contributions to the field:

Structural analysis of a U-superfamily conotoxin containing a mini-granulin fold: Insights into key features that distinguish between the ICK and granulin folds

Does the photoluminescence of rat fur influence interactions in the field?

Photoluminescence in mammal fur: 111 years of research

Pmu1a, a novel spider toxin with dual inhibitory activity at pain targets hNaV1.7 and hCaV3 voltage‐gated channels

Solution structure of the N-terminal extension domain of a Schistosoma japonicum asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase

Identification of an inter-cysteine loop potentially involved in the activity of Opisthorchis viverrini-granulin-1

Interactions between physiology and behaviour provide insights into the ecological role of venom in Australian funnel-web spiders: Interspecies comparison

Behaviour of the Sydney funnel-web spider Atrax robustus over different contexts, time, and stimuli

David Wilson Information

University

James Cook University

Position

___

Citations(all)

2044

Citations(since 2020)

1013

Cited By

1375

hIndex(all)

25

hIndex(since 2020)

19

i10Index(all)

44

i10Index(since 2020)

37

Email

University Profile Page

James Cook University

David Wilson Skills & Research Interests

Venom

Top articles of David Wilson

Structural analysis of a U-superfamily conotoxin containing a mini-granulin fold: Insights into key features that distinguish between the ICK and granulin folds

Authors

Tiziano Raffaelli,David T Wilson,Sebastien Dutertre,Julien Giribaldi,Irina Vetter,Samuel D Robinson,Ashvriya Thapa,Antin Widi,Alex Loukas,Norelle L Daly

Journal

Journal of Biological Chemistry

Published Date

2024/4/1

We are entering an exciting time in structural biology where artificial intelligence can be used to predict protein structures with greater accuracy than ever before. Extending this level of accuracy to the predictions of disulfide-rich peptide structures is likely to be more challenging, at least in the short term, given the tight packing of cysteine residues and the numerous ways that the disulfide bonds can potentially be linked. It has been previously shown in many cases that several disulfide bond connectivities can be accommodated by a single set of NMR-derived structural data without significant violations. Disulfide-rich peptides are prevalent throughout nature, and arguably the most well-known are those present in venoms from organisms such as cone snails. Here, we have determined the first three-dimensional structure and disulfide connectivity of a U-superfamily cone snail venom peptide, TxVIIB. TxVIIB has a VI …

Does the photoluminescence of rat fur influence interactions in the field?

Authors

Linda M Reinhold,David T Wilson,Tasmin L Rymer

Journal

Australian Journal of Zoology

Published Date

2024/1/9

While the photoluminescence of mammal fur is widespread, any potential function based on its optical properties remains speculative. Using paired photoluminescent and non-photoluminescent real-fur rat models in a field experiment, we aimed to test whether nocturnal vertebrates reacted differently to blueish-white photoluminescent fur than to non-photoluminescent fur. Remote cameras were set out in three different habitats (farmland, rainforest and woodland) in the Wet Tropics of Far North Queensland, Australia, over three full moon and three new moon phases. We recorded what species interacted with the models and counted the number of interactions with each model to calculate pair-wise differences of interactions with photoluminescent and non-photoluminescent models. No animal group (marsupial, placental mammal or avian) showed a preference for either model, on either new or full moon, suggesting …

Photoluminescence in mammal fur: 111 years of research

Authors

Linda M Reinhold,Tasmin L Rymer,Kristofer M Helgen,David T Wilson

Journal

Journal of Mammalogy

Published Date

2023/8/1

Photoluminescence in the pelage of mammals, a topic that has gained considerable recent research interest, was first documented in the 1700s and reported sporadically in the literature over the last century. The first detailed species accounts were of rabbits and humans, published 111 years ago in 1911. Recent studies have largely overlooked this earlier research into photoluminescent mammalian taxa and their luminophores. Here we provide a comprehensive update on existing research on photoluminescence in mammal fur, with the intention of drawing attention to earlier pioneering research in this field. We provide an overview on appropriate terminology, explain the physics of photoluminescence, and explore pigmentation and the ubiquitous photoluminescence of animal tissues, before touching on the emerging debate regarding visual function. We then provide a chronological account of research …

Pmu1a, a novel spider toxin with dual inhibitory activity at pain targets hNaV1.7 and hCaV3 voltage‐gated channels

Authors

Julien Giribaldi,Jean Chemin,Marie Tuifua,Jennifer R Deuis,Rosanna Mary,Irina Vetter,David T Wilson,Norelle L Daly,Christina I Schroeder,Emmanuel Bourinet,Sébastien Dutertre

Journal

The FEBS Journal

Published Date

2023/7

Venom‐derived peptides targeting ion channels involved in pain are regarded as a promising alternative to current, and often ineffective, chronic pain treatments. Many peptide toxins are known to specifically and potently block established therapeutic targets, among which the voltage‐gated sodium and calcium channels are major contributors. Here, we report on the discovery and characterization of a novel spider toxin isolated from the crude venom of Pterinochilus murinus that shows inhibitory activity at both hNaV1.7 and hCaV3.2 channels, two therapeutic targets implicated in pain pathways. Bioassay‐guided HPLC fractionation revealed a 36‐amino acid peptide with three disulfide bridges named μ/ω‐theraphotoxin‐Pmu1a (Pmu1a). Following isolation and characterization, the toxin was chemically synthesized and its biological activity was further assessed using electrophysiology, revealing Pmu1a to be a …

Solution structure of the N-terminal extension domain of a Schistosoma japonicum asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase

Authors

Yoshimi Peck,Darren Pickering,Mehdi Mobli,Michael J Liddell,David T Wilson,Roland Ruscher,Stephanie Ryan,Geraldine Buitrago,Connor McHugh,Nicholas C Love,Theresa Pinlac,Michael Haertlein,Michael A Kron,Alex Loukas,Norelle L Daly

Journal

Journal of Biomolecular Structure and Dynamics

Published Date

2023/7/26

Several secreted proteins from helminths (parasitic worms) have been shown to have immunomodulatory activities. Asparaginyl-tRNA synthetases are abundantly secreted in the filarial nematode Brugia malayi (BmAsnRS) and the parasitic flatworm Schistosoma japonicum (SjAsnRS), indicating a possible immune function. The suggestion is supported by BmAsnRS alleviating disease symptoms in a T-cell transfer mouse model of colitis. This immunomodulatory function is potentially related to an N-terminal extension domain present in eukaryotic AsnRS proteins but few structure/function studies have been done on this domain. Here we have determined the three-dimensional solution structure of the N-terminal extension domain of SjAsnRS. A protein containing the 114 N-terminal amino acids of SjAsnRS was recombinantly expressed with isotopic labelling to allow structure determination using 3D NMR …

Identification of an inter-cysteine loop potentially involved in the activity of Opisthorchis viverrini-granulin-1

Authors

Rozita Takjoo,David T Wilson,Paramjit S Bansal,Alex Loukas,Michael J Smout,Norelle L Daly

Journal

Exploration of Drug Science

Published Date

2023/6/30

Aim:Identification of small bioactive regions in proteins and peptides can be useful information in drug design studies. The current study has shown that an inter-cysteine loop of the N-terminal domain of Opisthorchis viverrini granulin-1 (Ov-GRN-1), a granulin protein from the flatworm liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini which has potent wound healing properties, maintains the bioactivity of the full-length protein.Methods:Peptides corresponding to the three inter-cysteine loops of the N-terminal domain were produced using synthetic chemistry, and their structures and bioactivities were analyzed using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and cell proliferation assays, respectively.Results:As expected for such small peptides, NMR analysis indicated that the peptides were poorly structured in solution. However, a seven-residue peptide corresponding to loop 2 (GRN-L2) promoted cell proliferation, in contrast to the other fragments.Conclusions:The results from the current study suggest that GRN-L2 might be responsible, in part, for the bioactivity of Ov-GRN-1, and might be a useful lead molecule for subsequent wound healing studies.

Interactions between physiology and behaviour provide insights into the ecological role of venom in Australian funnel-web spiders: Interspecies comparison

Authors

Linda Hernández Duran,David Thomas Wilson,Mohamed Salih,Tasmin Lee Rymer

Journal

Plos one

Published Date

2023/5/22

Australian funnel-web spiders are iconic species, characterized as being the most venomous spiders in the world. They are also valued for the therapeutics and natural bioinsecticides potentially hidden in their venom molecules. Although numerous biochemical and molecular structural approaches have tried to determine the factors driving venom complexity, these approaches have not considered behaviour, physiology and environmental conditions collectively, which can play a role in the evolution, complexity, and function of venom components in funnel-webs. This study used a novel interdisciplinary approach to understand the relationships between different behaviours (assessed in different ecological contexts) and morphophysiological variables (body condition, heart rate) that may affect venom composition in four species of Australian funnel-web spiders. We tested defensiveness, huddling behaviour, frequency of climbing, and activity for all species in three ecological contexts: i) predation using both indirect (puff of air) and direct (prodding) stimuli; ii) conspecific tolerance; and iii) exploration of a new territory. We also assessed morphophysiological variables and venom composition of all species. For Hadronyche valida, the expression of some venom components was associated with heart rate and defensiveness during the predation context. However, we did not find any associations between behavioural traits and morphophysiological variables in the other species, suggesting that particular associations may be species-specific. When we assessed differences between species, we found that the species separated out based on the …

Behaviour of the Sydney funnel-web spider Atrax robustus over different contexts, time, and stimuli

Authors

Linda Hernández Duran,David Thomas Wilson,Tasmin Lee Rymer

Journal

Toxicon: X

Published Date

2022/3/1

Atrax robustus is an iconic Australian spider because the venom can be lethal to humans. Moreover, some of the venom biomolecules have promise as therapeutic and bioinsecticidal leads. Nonetheless, aspects related to the life history and behaviour of this species, which might influence changes in venom components, have been overlooked. We assessed different behavioural traits (antipredator behaviour, defensiveness and activity) of juveniles and adult females across different contexts (predation, conspecific tolerance and exploration of a new territory) and stimuli (puff of air versus prod) over time. Adults responded to a puff of air faster than juveniles, but in response to a prod, both juveniles and adults become more defensive over time. No differences were observed between adults and juveniles for conspecific tolerance and exploration. Understanding behaviour of venomous species is important because …

Peptides derived from hookworm anti-inflammatory proteins suppress inducible colitis in mice and inflammatory cytokine production by human cells

Authors

Claudia Cobos,Paramjit S Bansal,David T Wilson,Linda Jones,Guangzu Zhao,Matthew A Field,Ramon M Eichenberger,Darren A Pickering,Rachael YM Ryan,Champa N Ratnatunga,John J Miles,Roland Ruscher,Paul R Giacomin,Severine Navarro,Alex Loukas,Norelle L Daly

Journal

Frontiers in Medicine

Published Date

2022/9/9

A decline in the prevalence of parasites such as hookworms appears to be correlated with the rise in non-communicable inflammatory conditions in people from high- and middle-income countries. This correlation has led to studies that have identified proteins produced by hookworms that can suppress inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and asthma in animal models. Hookworms secrete a family of abundant netrin-domain containing proteins referred to as AIPs (Anti-Inflammatory Proteins), but there is no information on the structure-function relationships. Here we have applied a downsizing approach to the hookworm AIPs to derive peptides of 20 residues or less, some of which display anti-inflammatory effects when co-cultured with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and oral therapeutic activity in a chemically induced mouse model of acute colitis. Our results indicate that a conserved helical region is responsible, at least in part, for the anti-inflammatory effects. This helical region has potential in the design of improved leads for treating IBD and possibly other inflammatory conditions.

Inter-species variation in stonefish (Synanceia SPP.) ichthyocrinotoxins; an ecological Perspective

Authors

Danica Lennox-Bulow,Michael Smout,David Wilson,Jamie Seymour

Journal

Toxicon

Published Date

2023/1/1

Although stonefish (Synanceia spp.) are well-known to harbour a highly noxious defensive venom in their dorsal spines, very little is known about the composition and ecological function of the ichthyocrinotoxins that they secrete onto their epidermis. This study profiled reef (Synanceia verrucosa) and estuarine (Synanceia horrida) stonefish ichthyocrinotoxins via electrophoresis, liquid chromatography, and mass spectrometry to visualise and compare the composition of these toxins between the two species. Stonefish ichthyocrinotoxins were found to be multifarious concoctions that exhibited subtle differences between reef and estuarine species. We speculate that these variations and similarities are driven by the different and similar ecology of these fish species. Further research into the activity of the toxins components is now required to better understand their ecological role.

Exploring behavioural traits over different contexts in four species of Australian funnel-web spiders

Authors

Linda Hernández Duran,David Thomas Wilson,Tasmin Lee Rymer

Journal

Current Zoology

Published Date

2022/10/12

Australian funnel-web spiders are arguably the most venomous spiders in the world, with much research focusing on this aspect of their biology. However, other aspects related to their life history, ecology and behaviour have been overlooked. For the first time, we assessed repeatability, namely risk-taking behaviour, aggressiveness and activity in the contexts of predation, conspecific tolerance and exploration of a new territory in four species of Australian funnel-web spiders: two are closely related, Hadronyche valida and H. infensa, and two have overlapping distributions but occupy different habitats, H. cerberea and Atrax robustus. We also compared behaviors between species. At the species level, we found that H. valida showed consistency in risk-taking behavior when exposed to a predator stimulus, aggressiveness against conspecifics, and exploration of a new territory. In contrast, in the other species …

Newly Discovered Peptides from the Coral Heliofungia actiniformis Show Structural and Functional Diversity

Authors

Casey A Schmidt,Ira Cooke,David T Wilson,David J Miller,Steve Peigneur,Jan Tytgat,Matthew Field,Rozita Takjoo,Michael J Smout,Alex Loukas,Norelle L Daly

Published Date

2022/7/13

Scleractinian corals are crucially important to the health of some of the world’s most biodiverse, productive, and economically important marine habitats. Despite this importance, analysis of coral peptidomes is still in its infancy. Here we show that the tentacle extract from the stony coral Heliofungia actiniformis is rich in peptides with diverse and novel structures. We have characterized the sequences and three-dimensional structures of four new peptides, three of which have no known homologues. We show that a 2 kDa peptide, Hact-2, promotes significant cell proliferation on human cells and speculate this peptide may be involved in the remarkable regenerative capacity of corals. We found a 3 kDa peptide, Hact-3, encoded within a fascin-like domain, and homologues of Hact-3 are present in the genomes of other coral species. Two additional peptides, Hact-4 and Hact-SCRiP1, with limited sequence similarity …

Beyond spider personality: The relationships between behavioral, physiological, and environmental factors

Authors

Linda Hernandez Duran,David Thomas Wilson,Mark Briffa,Tasmin Lee Rymer

Published Date

2021/4

Spiders are useful models for testing different hypotheses and methodologies relating to animal personality and behavioral syndromes because they show a range of behavioral types and unique physiological traits (e.g., silk and venom) that are not observed in many other animals. These characteristics allow for a unique understanding of how physiology, behavioral plasticity, and personality interact across different contexts to affect spider's individual fitness and survival. However, the relative effect of extrinsic factors on physiological traits (silk, venom, and neurohormones) that play an important role in spider survival, and which may impact personality, has received less attention. The goal of this review is to explore how the environment, experience, ontogeny, and physiology interact to affect spider personality types across different contexts. We highlight physiological traits, such as neurohormones, and unique …

Synthesis, Structural and Pharmacological Characterizations of CIC, a Novel α-Conotoxin with an Extended N-Terminal Tail

Authors

Julien Giribaldi,Yves Haufe,Edward RJ Evans,David T Wilson,Norelle L Daly,Christine Enjalbal,Annette Nicke,Sébastien Dutertre

Journal

Marine Drugs

Published Date

2021/3

Cone snails are venomous marine predators that rely on fast-acting venom to subdue their prey and defend against aggressors. The conotoxins produced in the venom gland are small disulfide-rich peptides with high affinity and selectivity for their pharmacological targets. A dominant group comprises α-conotoxins, targeting nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Here, we report on the synthesis, structure determination and biological activity of a novel α-conotoxin, CIC, found in the predatory venom of the piscivorous species Conus catus and its truncated mutant Δ-CIC. CIC is a 4/7 α-conotoxin with an unusual extended N-terminal tail. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy shows a major influence of the N-terminal tail on the apparent rigidity of the three-dimensional structure of CIC compared to the more flexible Δ-CIC. Surprisingly, this effect on the structure does not alter the biological activity, since both peptides selectively inhibit α3β2 and α6/α3β2β3 nAChRs with almost identical sub- to low micromolar inhibition constants. Our results suggest that the N-terminal part of α-conotoxins can accommodate chemical modifications without affecting their pharmacology.

Gastrointestinal helminth infection improves insulin sensitivity, decreases systemic inflammation, and alters the composition of gut microbiota in distinct mouse models of Type …

Authors

Zainab Khudhair,Rafid Alhallaf,Ramon M Eichenberger,Jen Whan,Andreas Kupz,Matt Field,Lutz Krause,David T Wilson,Norelle L Daly,Paul Giacomin,Javier Sotillo,Alex Loukas

Journal

Frontiers in Endocrinology

Published Date

2021/2/5

Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a major health problem and is considered one of the top 10 diseases leading to death globally. T2D has been widely associated with systemic and local inflammatory responses and with alterations in the gut microbiota. Microorganisms, including parasitic worms and gut microbes have exquisitely co-evolved with their hosts to establish an immunological interaction that is essential for the formation and maintenance of a balanced immune system, including suppression of excessive inflammation. Herein we show that both prophylactic and therapeutic infection of mice with the parasitic hookworm-like nematode, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, significantly reduced fasting blood glucose, oral glucose tolerance and body weight gain in two different diet-induced mouse models of T2D. Helminth infection was associated with elevated type 2 immune responses including increased eosinophil numbers in the mesenteric lymph nodes, liver and adipose tissues, as well as increased expression of IL-4 and alternatively activated macrophage marker genes in adipose tissue, liver and gut. N. brasiliensis infection was also associated with significant compositional changes in the gut microbiota at both the phylum and order levels. Our findings show that N. brasiliensis infection drives changes in local and systemic immune cell populations, and that these changes are associated with a reduction in systemic and local inflammation and compositional changes in the gut microbiota which cumulatively might be responsible for the improved insulin sensitivity observed in infected mice. Our findings indicate that carefully controlled therapeutic …

The influence of ecological factors on cnidarian venoms

Authors

EP O'Hara,D Wilson,JE Seymour

Published Date

2021/7/1

Venom research is often focussed on medical relevance, novel compounds and venom evolution, whilst studying the relationship between a venom and its environment – venom ecology - has been conducted to a lesser extent. Given the projected environmental changes envisioned to occur with global warming, it is pertinent now more than ever, to highlight this topic. Here we review literature examining the influence of ecological factors such as environmental temperature, salinity, ontogeny, geographic location and diet on cnidarian venoms. This review provides an exclusive focus on the cnidarian phylum and encompasses all available published, peer-reviewed literature to our knowledge regarding the ecological factors influencing venom. We find a startling lack of research into the effects of both environmental and biological factors on venoms, with very few to no studies available per category. Importantly …

Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Modulation by a New Spider Toxin Ssp1a Isolated From an Australian Theraphosid

Authors

Yashad Dongol,Phil M Choi,David T Wilson,Norelle L Daly,Fernanda C Cardoso,Richard J Lewis

Journal

Frontiers in Pharmacology

Published Date

2021/12/24

Given the important role of voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channel-modulating spider toxins in elucidating the function, pharmacology, and mechanism of action of therapeutically relevant NaV channels, we screened the venom from Australian theraphosid species against the human pain target hNaV1.7. Using assay-guided fractionation, we isolated a 33-residue inhibitor cystine knot (ICK) peptide (Ssp1a) belonging to the NaSpTx1 family. Recombinant Ssp1a (rSsp1a) inhibited neuronal hNaV subtypes with a rank order of potency hNaV1.7 > 1.6 > 1.2 > 1.3 > 1.1. rSsp1a inhibited hNaV1.7, hNaV1.2 and hNaV1.3 without significantly altering the voltage-dependence of activation, inactivation, or delay in recovery from inactivation. However, rSsp1a demonstrated voltage-dependent inhibition at hNaV1.7 and rSsp1a-bound hNaV1.7 opened at extreme depolarizations, suggesting rSsp1a likely interacted with voltage-sensing domain II (VSD II) of hNaV1.7 to trap the channel in its resting state. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed key structural features of Ssp1a, including an amphipathic surface with hydrophobic and charged patches shown by docking studies to comprise the interacting surface. This study provides the basis for future structure-function studies to guide the development of subtype selective inhibitors.

Plant derived cyclic peptides

Authors

Norelle L Daly,David T Wilson

Published Date

2021/6/30

Cyclic peptides are widespread throughout the plant kingdom, and display diverse sequences, structures and bioactivities. The potential applications attributed to these peptides and their unusual biosynthesis has captivated the attention of researchers for many years. Several gene sequences for plant cyclic peptides have been discovered over the last two decades but it is only recently that we are beginning to understand the intricacies associated with their biosynthesis. Recent studies have focussed on three main classes of plant derived cyclic peptides, namely orbitides, SFTI related peptides and cyclotides. In this mini-review, we discuss the expansion of the known sequence and structural diversity in these families, insights into the enzymes involved in the biosynthesis, the exciting applications which includes a cyclotide currently in clinical trials for the treatment of multiple sclerosis, and new production methods …

The Geographic Distribution, Venom Components, Pathology and Treatments of Stonefish (Synanceia spp.) Venom

Authors

Silvia L Saggiomo,Cadhla Firth,David T Wilson,Jamie Seymour,John J Miles,Yide Wong

Published Date

2021/5/24

Stonefish are regarded as one of the most venomous fish in the world. Research on stonefish venom has chiefly focused on the in vitro and in vivo neurological, cardiovascular, cytotoxic and nociceptive effects of the venom. The last literature review on stonefish venom was published over a decade ago, and much has changed in the field since. In this review, we have generated a global map of the current distribution of all stonefish (Synanceia) species, presented a table of clinical case reports and provided up-to-date information about the development of polyspecific stonefish antivenom. We have also presented an overview of recent advancements in the biomolecular composition of stonefish venom, including the analysis of transcriptomic and proteomic data from Synanceia horrida venom gland. Moreover, this review highlights the need for further research on the composition and properties of stonefish venom, which may reveal novel molecules for drug discovery, development or other novel physiological uses.

Characterisation of a Novel A-Superfamily Conotoxin

Authors

David T Wilson,Paramjit S Bansal,David A Carter,Irina Vetter,Annette Nicke,Sébastien Dutertre,Norelle L Daly

Journal

Biomedicines

Published Date

2020/5

Conopeptides belonging to the A-superfamily from the venomous molluscs, Conus, are typically α-conotoxins. The α-conotoxins are of interest as therapeutic leads and pharmacological tools due to their selectivity and potency at nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtypes. Structurally, the α-conotoxins have a consensus fold containing two conserved disulfide bonds that define the two-loop framework and brace a helical region. Here we report on a novel α-conotoxin Pl168, identified from the transcriptome of Conus planorbis, which has an unusual 4/8 loop framework. Unexpectedly, NMR determination of its three-dimensional structure reveals a new structural type of A-superfamily conotoxins with a different disulfide-stabilized fold, despite containing the conserved cysteine framework and disulfide connectivity of classical α-conotoxins. The peptide did not demonstrate activity on a range of nAChRs, or Ca2+ and Na+ channels suggesting that it might represent a new pharmacological class of conotoxins.

See List of Professors in David Wilson University(James Cook University)

David Wilson FAQs

What is David Wilson's h-index at James Cook University?

The h-index of David Wilson has been 19 since 2020 and 25 in total.

What are David Wilson's top articles?

The articles with the titles of

Structural analysis of a U-superfamily conotoxin containing a mini-granulin fold: Insights into key features that distinguish between the ICK and granulin folds

Does the photoluminescence of rat fur influence interactions in the field?

Photoluminescence in mammal fur: 111 years of research

Pmu1a, a novel spider toxin with dual inhibitory activity at pain targets hNaV1.7 and hCaV3 voltage‐gated channels

Solution structure of the N-terminal extension domain of a Schistosoma japonicum asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase

Identification of an inter-cysteine loop potentially involved in the activity of Opisthorchis viverrini-granulin-1

Interactions between physiology and behaviour provide insights into the ecological role of venom in Australian funnel-web spiders: Interspecies comparison

Behaviour of the Sydney funnel-web spider Atrax robustus over different contexts, time, and stimuli

...

are the top articles of David Wilson at James Cook University.

What are David Wilson's research interests?

The research interests of David Wilson are: Venom

What is David Wilson's total number of citations?

David Wilson has 2,044 citations in total.

    academic-engine

    Useful Links