Aviad Agam

Aviad Agam

Tel Aviv University

H-index: 14

Asia-Israel

About Aviad Agam

Aviad Agam, With an exceptional h-index of 14 and a recent h-index of 12 (since 2020), a distinguished researcher at Tel Aviv University, specializes in the field of Lower Paleolithic Prehistory, Early fire, Child safety, child injury prevention.

His recent articles reflect a diverse array of research interests and contributions to the field:

Child drowning mortality in Israel: trends and measures for prevention

Heat Treatment of Flint at the Late Neanderthal Site Sesselfelsgrotte (Germany)

Flint Heat Treatment at Late Neanderthal Site Sesselfelsgrotte (Germany)

Acknowledgment to the Reviewers of Quaternary in 2022

Kaizer Hill (Modi ‘in), a pre-pottery neolithic a quarry site–the terraced slopes

The role of side-scrapers and cortical flakes in Late Acheulian Toolkits: Results of a techno-functional analysis from Revadim (Israel)

Flint type analysis at Late Acheulian Jaljulia (Israel), and implications for the origins of prepared core technologies

Estimating temperatures of heated Lower Palaeolithic flint artefacts

Aviad Agam Information

University

Tel Aviv University

Position

___

Citations(all)

578

Citations(since 2020)

485

Cited By

266

hIndex(all)

14

hIndex(since 2020)

12

i10Index(all)

14

i10Index(since 2020)

13

Email

University Profile Page

Tel Aviv University

Aviad Agam Skills & Research Interests

Lower Paleolithic Prehistory

Early fire

Child safety

child injury prevention

Top articles of Aviad Agam

Child drowning mortality in Israel: trends and measures for prevention

Authors

Aviad Agam,Yigal Godler,Elad Calif

Journal

Journal of safety research

Published Date

2024/2/14

Introduction: In this study, we use the media-based database of Beterem-Safe Kids Israel, to provide a 15-year review of unintentional fatal childhood drowning in Israel, between 2008 and 2022. Method: It total, we identified 257 cases of child mortality due to drowning during this period. Results: Our results demonstrate a gradual rise in childhood mortality due to drowning, from 72 cases in 2008–2012, to 85 cases in 2013–2017, and to 100 cases in 2018–2022. Especially worth noting is the increase in childhood drowning in domestic swimming pools. We point to a link between low socioeconomic status and cases of drowning, showing that the risk of drowning extends beyond a mere matter of caregiver inattention. We recommend a series of regulatory and legislative steps to reduce fatal childhood drowning, including fencing built around domestic swimming pools, extending lifeguard activity hours, adding …

Heat Treatment of Flint at the Late Neanderthal Site Sesselfelsgrotte (Germany)

Authors

Aviad Agam,Merlin Hattermann,Iddo Pinkas,Jürgen Richter,Thorsten Uthmeier

Journal

Quaternary

Published Date

2023/10/7

We examined lithic artifacts from the late Neanderthal site Sesselfelsgrotte (Bavaria, Germany) in order to evaluate the possibility of fire use and intentional flint heat treatment performed by late Neanderthals. We analyzed 1113 flint pieces from the G-layer complex (~60 to 45 kya; Micoquian) and 946 from the lower-layer complex (~115 to 70 kya; Mousterian). Based on macroscopic traits associated with the exposure of flint to heat and fire, we assigned artifacts to one of three groups: burnt, unburnt, and possibly intentionally heated. Our results show that while both complexes demonstrate the clear presence of fire, fire is more common in the younger G-layer complex. Moreover, possibly intentionally heated pieces are significantly more frequent in the G-layer complex, especially among the tools and specifically among side scrapers, suggesting a link between heat treatment and the production of these tools, most probably due to their functional and cultural significance. We therefore suggest that the flint in the G-layer complex of Sesselfelsgrotte underwent intentional heat treatment. The proportions of burnt flint artifacts in both complexes suggest an intensification in fire use at the site over time, while the appearance of possibly intentionally heated artifacts in the G-layer complex suggests the development of this advanced pyrotechnology by Neanderthals sometime between these two timeframes. Our results are supported by sedimentological and faunal data. We view these results as further indication of the advanced cognitive and technological capabilities of Neanderthals, which did not fall short of those of early modern humans.

Flint Heat Treatment at Late Neanderthal Site Sesselfelsgrotte (Germany)

Authors

Aviad Agam,Merlin Hattermann,Iddo Pinkas,Jürgen Richter,Thorsten Uthmeier

Published Date

2023/1/20

We examine lithic artifacts from Late Neanderthal site Sesselfelsgrotte (Bavaria, Germany) to evaluate the possibility of fire-use and the intentional flint heat treatment performed by Late Neanderthals. We analyzed 1,113 flint pieces from the G-Layers-Complex (~ 60 to 45 kya; Micoquian), and 946 from the Lower-Layers-Complex (~ 115 to 70 kya; Mousterian), based on macroscopic traits associated with the exposure of flint to fire, assigning artifacts to one of three groups: burnt, unburnt, and possibly intentionally heated. Our results show that while both complexes demonstrate clear presence of fire, fire is more common in the younger G-Layers-Complex. Moreover, possibly intentionally heated pieces are significantly more frequent in the G-Layers-Complex, especially among the tools, and specifically among side scrapers, proposing a link between heat treatment and the production of these tools, most probably due to their functional and cultural significance. We therefore suggest the intentional heat treatment of flint in the G-Layers-Complex of Sesselfelsgrotte. The proportions of burnt flint artifacts in both sequences suggest an intensification in fire-use at the site over time, while the appearance of possibly intentionally heated artifacts in the G-Layers-Complex suggests the development of this advanced pyro-technology by Neanderthals, sometime between these two timeframes. Our results are supported by sedimentological and faunal data. We view these results as further indication for the advanced cognitive and technological capabilities of Neanderthals, such that did not fall from these of Early Modern Humans.

Acknowledgment to the Reviewers of Quaternary in 2022

Authors

Anatoly V Mozherovsky,Gregory S Springer,Andreas Scharf,Grigoriy Ivanovich Dolgikh,Andrew G Fountain,Ioannis Vakalas,Angela Baldanza,Isabella Serena Liso,Aviad Agam,Iván Sunyé-Puchol,Blas Lorenzo Valero-Garcés,JRK Kumar Dabbakuti,Catalin Lazar,Jacek Bogusław Szmańda,Changxing Shi,Jack Longman,Charuta Kulkarni,Jadranka Barešić,Christine Hertler,James B Innes,Christopher I Roos,Jamil AA Anache,Christos Kanellopoulos,Jan Barabach,Clemens Von Scheffer,Jan Van Der Made,Cristóbal Verdugo-Escamilla,Jean-Pierre Suc,Csaba Béla Eötvös,Jerry R Miller,Daniel Ballesteros,Jesse Thornburg,David M Miller,Jiri Chlachula,Dirk Enters,Jiří Málek,Donatella Magri,Jiří Zachariáš,Efthymios K Tripsanas,John Lowe,Ekaterina G Ershova,Jordi Revelles,Elda Russo Ermolli,Jorge Sanjurjo Sanchez,Eleonora Carol,Joseph Mason,Elizaveta Kovaleva,Juan Cruz Colazo,Eric A Barefoot,Juan Manuel Rubiales,Ethan Yackulic,Julien Beck,Federico Di Rita,Junghyung Ryu,Federico L Agnolin,Kamal Taheri

Published Date

2023

High-quality academic publishing is built on rigorous peer review. Quaternary was able to uphold its high standards for published papers due to the outstanding efforts of our reviewers. Thanks to the efforts of our reviewers in 2022, the median time to first decision was 28.5 days and the median time to publication was 94 days. Regardless of whether the articles they examined were ultimately published, the editors would like to express their appreciation and thank the following reviewers for the time and dedication that they have shown Quaternary:

Kaizer Hill (Modi ‘in), a pre-pottery neolithic a quarry site–the terraced slopes

Authors

Naama Goren-Inbar,Anna Belfer-Cohen,Leore Grosman,Gadi Herzlinger,Aviad Agam

Journal

Plos one

Published Date

2022/3/24

The research of the Kaizer Hill site (the Hilltop and its Terraces), recognized as a Pre Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA) quarry site, involved studies of the rock damage associated with the quarrying activities as well as of the recovered material remains, mostly chipped stone artifacts. We present here the results of our on-site explorations (excavations, surveys and surface-collections), focusing on the findings deriving from the Terraces. Diverse rock damage patterns were identified and described, portraying systematic rock mass-exploitation through quarrying fronts, natural rock joints and fissures enlargement, drilling and chiseling. There are multiple indications that the local bedrock (Bi’na Formation, Turonian) comprising flint and limestone was quarried under a systematic quality evaluation, leaving residual flint unsuitable for exploitation. Of interest to note that nearly all of the flint artifacts excavated and collected on the Terraces were made on raw material transported from the Hilltop (Mishash Formation, Campanian), knapped in-situ, on the quarried rock surfaces of the slopes. The flint tools bear witness to intensive use involving mainly boring and drilling. The dominant tool type is the flint axe for which a variety of waste products related to its production were found in-situ, enabling the reconstruction of axe reduction sequence. Similar axes and waste products were found in many PPN sites indicating that there was a common, widely-used scheme of making flint axes during the PPN. Interestingly, besides the flint waste, there were also limestone waste products typical of the last shaping and thinning stages of axe production, indicating that limestone …

The role of side-scrapers and cortical flakes in Late Acheulian Toolkits: Results of a techno-functional analysis from Revadim (Israel)

Authors

Flavia Venditti,Ran Barkai,Stella Nunzinate Cesaro,Aviad Agam

Journal

Lithic Technology

Published Date

2022/7/3

Recent techno-functional studies of the lithic assemblage of Layer C3 in Late Acheulian Revadim (Israel) have demonstrated the variability in tool production and use in this layer. Here we present the results of a techno-functional and residue analysis of two central categories of artifacts found in Layer C3: side-scrapers and cortical flakes. We investigate the assumed functional link between side-scrapers and scraping activities and examine the question of whether cortical flakes were considered by the Revadim hominins as simple waste products or as useful tools. Our study applies an integrative and multidisciplinary methodology combining experimental archaeology, use-wear and residue analysis, and spectroscopic measurements. Our results show that side-scrapers were used for scraping and mixed activities, mostly on soft-medium and medium materials, while cortical flakes were occasionally used, mostly for …

Flint type analysis at Late Acheulian Jaljulia (Israel), and implications for the origins of prepared core technologies

Authors

Aviad Agam,Tamar Rosenberg-Yefet,Lucy Wilson,Maayan Shemer,Ran Barkai

Journal

Frontiers in Earth Science

Published Date

2022/5/26

Prepared Core Technologies, often considered a hallmark of the Middle Paleolithic Mousterian, have recently been observed, to some extent, in many late Lower Paleolithic Acheulian sites. This may indicate a Lower Paleolithic origin of the Levallois method, although the circumstances leading to its emergence, spread and assimilation are still debated. We aim at contributing towards this intriguing issue by studying patterns of flint procurement and exploitation at Late Acheulian Jaljulia (Israel; ~500-300kya). We classified artifacts into flint types, using four samples: a general sample, bifaces, 'regular' cores with one/two striking platforms, and prepared cores, divided into proto-Levallois, prepared (general) and discoid cores. A geologic survey located potential flint sources, and a petrographic analysis was used to assign flint types to sources. Our results show that while local Turonian flint of the Bi'na Formation dominates the general sample, selectivity in using specific flint types was observed, including among local materials. While brecciated flint types are especially common among handaxes and discoid cores, among proto-Levallois and prepared cores (general), fine-textured homogenous flint types are more common, suggesting that such flint types are better-suited when improved control over the end-product was desired. Based on our results, and following previous suggestions, we support the hypothesis that prepared core technologies in the Levant did not originate from one single technological trajectory. We support the idea that the production of predetermined blanks was based on knowledge gathered from several technological …

Estimating temperatures of heated Lower Palaeolithic flint artefacts

Authors

Aviad Agam,Ido Azuri,Iddo Pinkas,Avi Gopher,Filipe Natalio

Journal

Nature Human Behaviour

Published Date

2021/2

Production of stone artefacts using pyro-technology is known from the Middle and Upper Palaeolithic of Europe and the Levant, and the Middle Stone Age in Africa. However, determination of temperatures to which flint artefacts were exposed is impeded by the chemical and structural variability of flint. Here we combine Raman spectroscopy and machine learning to build temperature-estimation models to infer the degree of pyro-technological control effected by inhabitants of the late Lower Palaeolithic (Acheulo-Yabrudian) site of Qesem Cave, Israel. Temperature estimation shows that blades were heated at lower median temperatures (259 °C) compared to flakes (413 °C), whereas heat-induced structural flint damage (for example, pot-lids and microcracks) appears at 447 °C. These results are consistent with a differential behaviour for selective tool production that can be viewed as part of a plethora of …

An integrated study discloses chopping tools use from Late Acheulean Revadim (Israel)

Authors

Flavia Venditti,Aviad Agam,Jacopo Tirillo,Stella Nunziante-Cesaro,Ran Barkai

Journal

Plos one

Published Date

2021/1/19

Chopping tools/choppers provide one of the earliest and most persistent examples of stone tools produced and used by early humans. These artifacts appeared for the first time ~2.5 million years ago in Africa and are characteristic of the Oldowan and Acheulean cultural complexes throughout the Old World. Chopping tools were manufactured and used by early humans for more than two million years regardless of differences in geography, climate, resource availability, or major transformations in human cultural and biological evolution. Despite their widespread distribution through time and space in Africa and Eurasia, little attention has been paid to the function of these items, while scholars still debate whether they are tools or cores. In this paper, we wish to draw attention to these prominent and ubiquitous early lithic artifacts through the investigation of 53 chopping tools retrieved from a specific context at Late Acheulean Revadim (Israel). We combined typo-technological and functional studies with a residue analysis aimed at shedding light on their functional role within the tool-kits of the inhabitants of the site. Here we show that most of the chopping tools were used to chop hard and medium materials, such as bone, most probably for marrow extraction. A few of the tools were also used for cutting and scraping activities, while some also served as cores for further flake detachment. The chopping tools exhibit extraordinarily well-preserved bone residues suggesting they were used mainly for bone-breaking and marrow acquisition. We discuss the data and explore the tool versus core debate also in light of a sample of 50 flake cores made on …

Flint procurement and exploitation strategies in the late lower Paleolithic levant: A view from Acheulo-Yabrudian Qesem Cave (Israel)

Authors

Aviad Agam

Journal

Flint Procurement and Exploitation Strategies in the Late Lower Paleolithic Levant

Published Date

2021

The Late Lower Paleolithic of the Levant is a significant stage in human prehistory, characterized by changes in subsistence, technology and social structure, most likely accompanied by the appearance of a new human lineage (Barkai and Gopher 2013). The Acheulo-Yabrudian Cultural Complex (AYCC), the latest cultural entity of the Lower Paleolithic period in the Levant, has yielded remarkable discoveries, including evidence for the habitual use of fire (Blasco et al. 2016a; Shahack-Gross et al. 2014; Shimelmitz et al. 2014), repetitive lithic recycling (Assaf et al. 2015; Parush et al. 2015), and the systematic production of blades (Barkai et al. 2009; Shimelmitz et al. 2016) and Quina and demi-Quina scrapers (Lemorini et al. 2016; Shimelmitz et al. 2011; Zupancich et al. 2016a, b). The multi-layered, well-preserved AYCC site of Qesem Cave stands out with its extraordinary finds and research potential. This book …

Late lower paleolithic lithic procurement and exploitation strategies: A view from Acheulo-Yabrudian Qesem Cave (Israel)

Authors

Aviad Agam

Journal

Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports

Published Date

2020/10/1

This study presents patterns of flint acquisition and exploitation, observed through a large-scale study of the lithic assemblages from the Middle Pleistocene Acheulo-Yabrudian Qesem Cave (Israel). For this, twelve lithic assemblages from the cave were classified into flint types, based on visual traits. Also, potential flint sources were located, petrographic thin sections of archaeological and geologic samples were analyzed, and geochemical analyses, using both ICP-MS (Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry) and ICP-AES (Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy), were performed. The results show that local Turonian flint was often brought and used at the cave, while flint types from other non-Turonian origins were also used at the site in noteworthy proportions. The results suggest that the availability of desired lithic materials around the cave, and their suitability for the production of …

Excavating tailing piles at Kakal Spur (Kerem Ben Zimra) locality in the Nahal Dishon prehistoric flint extraction and reduction complex, northern Galilee, Israel

Authors

Meir Finkel,Avi Gopher,Aviad Agam

Journal

Archaeological Research in Asia

Published Date

2020/9/1

Recent research has demonstrated that the Eocene Timrat Formation outcrops in northeastern Israel, which appear as an extensive land ‘strip’ west of and parallel to the Jordan Rift Valley, was a major source of flint in prehistoric times. This is supported by the identification of three large-scale extraction and reduction (E&R) complexes (Nahal Dishon, Mt. Achbara and Sede Ilan) that offer direct evidence of intense exploitation during the Lower and Middle Paleolithic, and limited Neolithic/Chalcolithic activities. We present the results of an excavation performed in two E&R tailing piles at Kakal Spur (Kerem Ben Zimra) in the Nahal Dishon Complex. Extrapolation of the amount and weight of knapped flint items from the excavated part of Pile 1 results in an estimate of some ~300,000 flint items weighing ~24 tons for the whole pile. Basalt and limestone wedges found in the excavation suggest their use in the extraction …

Interpreting the Quina and demi-Quina scrapers from Acheulo-Yabrudian Qesem Cave, Israel: Results of raw materials and functional analyses

Authors

Aviad Agam,Andrea Zupancich

Journal

Journal of human evolution

Published Date

2020/7/1

Quina scrapers are well-known components of the European Middle Paleolithic Mousterian. A similar production process was detected within the lithic assemblages of the Levantine Acheulo-Yabrudian (∼400–200 ka). This study combines the results of use-wear and raw material analyses of 75 Quina scrapers and 133 demi-Quina scrapers from the Acheulo-Yabrudian site Qesem Cave, Israel, aimed at interpreting the function of Quina and demi-Quina at Qesem Cave, the considerations affecting the lithic choices involved in their production, and the behavioral and evolutionary implications. Each scraper was examined for use-wear and was assigned to a flint type and potential geologic source(s). Our results demonstrate a selective pattern of exploitation of flint which does not originate from the local Turonian outcrops, specifically for the manufacture of Quina and demi-Quina scrapers. This suggests a thoughtful …

Flint type analysis of bifaces from Acheulo-Yabrudian Qesem Cave (Israel) suggests an older Acheulian origin

Authors

Aviad Agam,Lucy Wilson,Avi Gopher,Ran Barkai

Journal

Journal of Paleolithic Archaeology

Published Date

2020/12

This paper presents the results of a flint type analysis performed for the small assemblage of bifaces found at the Acheulo-Yabrudian site Qesem Cave (QC), Israel (420–200 kya), which includes 12 handaxes, three bifacial roughouts, one trihedral, and one bifacial spall. The analysed artefacts were measured and classified into flint types based on visual traits. Also, extensive fieldwork aimed at locating potential sources was carried out. The bifaces were then assigned to potential flint sources, using both macroscopic and petrographic data, and were compared with a large general sample (n = 21,102) from various typo-technological categories and from various QC assemblages, studied by the same analytic process. Our results show that while the site is located within rich flint-bearing limestone outcrops of the Bi’na Formation (Upper Cretaceous Turonian), which dominate the general sample, non …

See List of Professors in Aviad Agam University(Tel Aviv University)

Aviad Agam FAQs

What is Aviad Agam's h-index at Tel Aviv University?

The h-index of Aviad Agam has been 12 since 2020 and 14 in total.

What are Aviad Agam's top articles?

The articles with the titles of

Child drowning mortality in Israel: trends and measures for prevention

Heat Treatment of Flint at the Late Neanderthal Site Sesselfelsgrotte (Germany)

Flint Heat Treatment at Late Neanderthal Site Sesselfelsgrotte (Germany)

Acknowledgment to the Reviewers of Quaternary in 2022

Kaizer Hill (Modi ‘in), a pre-pottery neolithic a quarry site–the terraced slopes

The role of side-scrapers and cortical flakes in Late Acheulian Toolkits: Results of a techno-functional analysis from Revadim (Israel)

Flint type analysis at Late Acheulian Jaljulia (Israel), and implications for the origins of prepared core technologies

Estimating temperatures of heated Lower Palaeolithic flint artefacts

...

are the top articles of Aviad Agam at Tel Aviv University.

What are Aviad Agam's research interests?

The research interests of Aviad Agam are: Lower Paleolithic Prehistory, Early fire, Child safety, child injury prevention

What is Aviad Agam's total number of citations?

Aviad Agam has 578 citations in total.

What are the co-authors of Aviad Agam?

The co-authors of Aviad Agam are Iddo Pinkas, Flavia Venditti.

Co-Authors

H-index: 30
Iddo Pinkas

Iddo Pinkas

Weizmann Institute of Science

H-index: 9
Flavia Venditti

Flavia Venditti

Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen

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