Abdelhamid Benazzouz

Abdelhamid Benazzouz

Université de Bordeaux

H-index: 64

Europe-France

Abdelhamid Benazzouz Information

University

Université de Bordeaux

Position

Directeur de recherche Inserm CNRS UMR5293

Citations(all)

22902

Citations(since 2020)

4095

Cited By

20342

hIndex(all)

64

hIndex(since 2020)

33

i10Index(all)

113

i10Index(since 2020)

73

Email

University Profile Page

Université de Bordeaux

Abdelhamid Benazzouz Skills & Research Interests

Neurosciences

Maladie de Parkinson

Top articles of Abdelhamid Benazzouz

Usefulness of thalamic beta activity for closed-loop therapy in essential tremor

A partial loss of effectiveness of deep brain stimulation of the ventral intermediate nucleus of the thalamus (VIM) has been reported in some patients with essential tremor (ET), possibly due to habituation to permanent stimulation. This study focused on the evolution of VIM local-field potentials (LFPs) data over time to assess the long-term feasibility of closed-loop therapy based on thalamic activity. We performed recordings of thalamic LFPs in 10 patients with severe ET using the ACTIVA™ PC + S (Medtronic plc.) allowing both recordings and stimulation in the same region. Particular attention was paid to describing the evolution of LFPs over time from 3 to 24 months after surgery when the stimulation was Off. We demonstrated a significant decrease in high-beta LFPs amplitude during movements inducing tremor in comparison to the rest condition 3 months after surgery (1.91 ± 0.89 at rest vs. 1.27 ± 1.37 µV2 …

Authors

Dominique Guehl,Etienne Guillaud,Nicolas Langbour,Emilie Doat,Nicolas Auzou,Edouard Courtin,Olivier Branchard,Julien Engelhardt,Abdelhamid Benazzouz,Alexandre Eusebio,Emmanuel Cuny,Pierre Burbaud

Journal

Scientific Reports

Published Date

2023/12/15

Neural tissue unit and use of such a unit for implantation into the nervous system of a mammal

The invention relates to a neural tissue unit for use in implantation into the nervous system of a human or non-human mammal, wherein said neural tissue unit contains differentiated post-mitotic neuronal cells in an extracellular matrix, said unit being obtained from a cellular microcompartment comprising a hydrogel capsule surrounding the neural tissue unit, and said hydrogel capsule being at least partially removed before use of the neural tissue unit. The invention also relates to a process for preparing such a neural tissue unit.

Published Date

2023/8/17

Editorial Deep Brain Stimulation Issue 2 by Dr Yasin Temel & Dr Abdelhamid Benazzouz

The second issue of Deep Brain Stimulation (see dbsjournal. com) is published. All papers can be accessed freely. The second issue contains four papers and this editorial. The publication of the second issue comes just after the first conference of the Deep Brain Stimulation Society (www. dbssociety. org). This event took place in Grenoble, France, on 22–23 June 2023. The theme of the meeting was “Celebrating the 30th anniversary of subthalamic nucleus (STN) DBS. Attendees came from different parts of the world and discussed the past, present and future of DBS. Industries involved in DBS showed their recent products and provided a glimpse of what we can expect in the near future.Three key persons of the team that applied modern DBS, and developed this therapy further, were celebrated; Alim-Louis Benabid the neurosurgeon, Pierre Pollak the neurologist and Abdelhamid Benazzouz the neurophysiologist …

Authors

Yasin Temel,Abdelhamid Benazzouz

Journal

Deep Brain Stimulation

Published Date

2023/8/1

Prelimbic cortical stimulation induces Antidepressant-like responses through Dopaminergic-Dependent and-Independent Mechanisms

High-frequency stimulation (HFS) is a promising therapy for patients with depression. However, the mechanisms underlying the HFS-induced antidepressant-like effects on susceptibility and resilience to depressive-like behaviors remain obscure. Given that dopaminergic neurotransmission has been found to be disrupted in depression, we investigated the dopamine(DA)-dependent mechanism of the antidepressant-like effects of HFS of the prelimbic cortex (HFS PrL). We performed HFS PrL in a rat model of mild chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) together with 6-hydroxydopamine lesioning in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) and ventral tegmental area (VTA). Animals were assessed for anxiety, anhedonia, and behavioral despair. We also examined levels of corticosterone, hippocampal neurotransmitters, neuroplasticity-related proteins, and morphological changes in dopaminergic neurons. We found 54.3% of CUS animals exhibited decreased sucrose consumption and were designated as CUS-susceptible, while the others were designated CUS-resilient. HFS PrL in both the CUS-susceptible and CUS-resilient animals significantly increased hedonia, reduced anxiety, decreased forced swim immobility, enhanced hippocampal DA and serotonin levels, and reduced corticosterone levels when compared with the respective sham groups. The hedonic-like effects were abolished in both DRN- and VTA-lesioned groups, suggesting the effects of HFS PrL are DA-dependent. Interestingly, VTA-lesioned sham animals had increased anxiety and forced swim immobility, which was reversed by HFS PrL. The VTA-lesioned HFS PrL animals also had …

Authors

Sharafuddin Khairuddin,Wei Ling Lim,Luca Aquili,Ka Chun Tsui,Anna Chung-Kwan Tse,Shehani Jayalath,Ruhani Varma,Trevor Sharp,Abdelhamid Benazzouz,Harry Steinbusch,Arjan Blokland,Yasin Temel,Lee Wei Lim

Journal

Cells

Published Date

2023/5/23

Neuropathic pain modeling: Focus on synaptic and ion channel mechanisms

Animal models of pain consist of modeling a pain-like state and measuring the consequent behavior. The first animal models of neuropathic pain (NP) were developed in rodents with a total lesion of the sciatic nerve. Later, other models targeting central or peripheral branches of nerves were developed to identify novel mechanisms that contribute to persistent pain conditions in NP. Objective assessment of pain in these different animal models represents a significant challenge for pre-clinical research. Multiple behavioral approaches are used to investigate and to validate pain phenotypes including withdrawal reflex to evoked stimuli, vocalizations, spontaneous pain, but also emotional and affective behaviors. Furthermore, animal models were very useful in investigating the mechanisms of NP. This review will focus on a detailed description of rodent models of NP and provide an overview of the assessment of the …

Authors

Rabia Bouali-Benazzouz,Marc Landry,Abdelhamid Benazzouz,Pascal Fossat

Published Date

2021/6/1

Cell-penetrating, antioxidant SELENOT mimetic protects dopaminergic neurons and ameliorates motor dysfunction in Parkinson's disease animal models

Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by motor dysfunction for which there is an unmet need for better treatment options. Although oxidative stress is a common feature of neurodegenerative diseases, notably PD, there is currently no efficient therapeutic strategy able to tackle this multi-target pathophysiological process. Based on our previous observations of the potent antioxidant and neuroprotective activity of SELENOT, a vital thioredoxin-like selenoprotein, we designed the small peptide PSELT from its redox active site to evaluate its antioxidant properties in vivo, and its potential polyfunctional activity in PD models. PSELT protects neurotoxin-treated dopaminergic neurons against oxidative stress and cell death, and their fibers against neurotoxic degeneration. PSELT is cell-permeable and acts in multiple subcellular compartments of dopaminergic neurons that are vulnerable to …

Authors

Ifat Alsharif,Loubna Boukhzar,Benjamin Lefranc,David Godefroy,Juliette Aury-Landas,Jean-Luc Do Rego,Jean-Claude Do Rego,Frédéric Naudet,Arnaud Arabo,Abdeslam Chagraoui,David Maltête,Abdelhamid Benazzouz,Catherine Baugé,Jérôme Leprince,Abdel G Elkahloun,Lee E Eiden,Youssef Anouar

Journal

Redox biology

Published Date

2021/4/1

Covid‐19 infection and parkinsonism: is there a link?

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS‐CoV‐2) is an opportunistic pathogen that infects the upper respiratory tract in humans and causes serious illness, including fatal pneumonia and neurological disorders. Several studies have reported that SARS‐CoV‐2 may worsen the symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD), with the potential to increase mortality rates in patients with advanced disease. The potential risk of SARS‐CoV‐2 to induce PD has also been suggested because the virus can enter the brain, where it can trigger cellular processes involved in neurodegeneration. In this review, we will discuss the potential of SARS‐CoV‐2 to exacerbate and cause certain neurological disorders, including PD. We will then elucidate its impact on the brain while examining its pathways and mechanisms of action. © 2021 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society

Authors

Rabia Bouali‐Benazzouz,Abdelhamid Benazzouz

Published Date

2021/8

Bifenthrin insecticide promotes oxidative stress and increases inflammatory mediators in human neuroblastoma cells through NF-kappaB pathway

The extensive application of bifenthrin (BF) insecticide in agriculture has raised serious concerns with regard to increased risks of developing neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, our group showed that BF exposure in rodent models induced oxidative stress and inflammation markers in various regions of the brain (frontal cortex, striatum and hippocampus) and this was associated with behavioral changes. This study aimed to confirm such inflammatory and oxidative stress in an in vitro cell culture model of SK-N-SH human neuroblastoma cells. Markers of oxidative stress (ROS, NO, MDA, H2O2), antioxidant enzyme activities (CAT, GPx, SOD) and inflammatory response (TNF-α, IL-6, PGE2) were analyzed in SK-N-SH cells after 24 h of exposure to different concentrations of BF (1–20 μM). Protein synthesis and mRNA expression of the enzymes implicated in the synthesis of PGE2 were also measured (COX-2 …

Authors

Brahim Gargouri,Khadija Boukholda,Asit Kumar,Abdelhamid Benazzouz,Hamadi Fetoui,Bernd L Fiebich,Michèle Bouchard

Journal

Toxicology in Vitro

Published Date

2020/6/1

Mechanisms Stimulation of Deep Brain

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is now considered as a treatment of choice for patients suffering from certain neurological and psychiatric disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, tremor, dystonia, and obsessive–compulsive disorders. However, its mechanisms of action are still debated. In this chapter, we describe and discuss how DBS works based on experimental data from animal models and clinical data from patients. The stimulation frequencies commonly used in clinical applications range between 130 and 185 Hz, involving a fairly complex interaction of inhibitory and excitatory effects, both locally and at a distance from the stimulated target. The majority of studies have shown that these frequencies induced a func-

Authors

Abdelhamid Benazzouz,Clement Hamani

Journal

Fundamentals and Clinics of Deep Brain Stimulation: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Published Date

2020/3/24

In vivo validation of a new portable stimulator for chronic deep brain stimulation in freely moving rats

BackgroundDeep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is considered as a gold standard therapy for the alleviation of motor symptoms in Parkinson’s disease (PD). This success paved the way to its application for other neurological and psychiatric disorders. In this context, we aimed to develop a rodent-specific stimulator with characteristics similar to those used in patients.New methodWe designed a stimulator that can be connected to an electrode container with options for bilateral or unilateral stimulation selection and offers a wide range of frequencies, pulse widths and intensities, constant current, biphasic current-control and charge balancing. Dedicated software was developed to program these parameters and the device was tested on a bilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat model of PD.ResultsThe equipment was well tolerated by the animals with a good general welfare. STN …

Authors

Houyam Tibar,Frédéric Naudet,Florian Kölbl,Bastien Ribot,Emilie Faggiani,Gilles N’kaoua,Sylvie Renaud,Noëlle Lewis,Abdelhamid Benazzouz

Journal

Journal of Neuroscience Methods

Published Date

2020/3/1

A Subset of Purposeless Oral Movements Triggered by Dopaminergic Agonists Is Modulated by 5-HT2C Receptors in Rats: Implication of the Subthalamic Nucleus

Dopaminergic medication for Parkinson’s disease is associated with troubling dystonia and dyskinesia and, in rodents, dopaminergic agonists likewise induce a variety of orofacial motor responses, certain of which are mimicked by serotonin2C (5-HT2C) receptor agonists. However, the neural substrates underlying these communalities and their interrelationship remain unclear. In Sprague-Dawley rats, the dopaminergic agonist, apomorphine (0.03–0.3 mg/kg) and the preferential D2/3 receptor agonist quinpirole (0.2–0.5 mg/kg), induced purposeless oral movements (chewing, jaw tremor, tongue darting). The 5-HT2C receptor antagonist 5-methyl-1-[[2-[(2-methyl-3-pyridyl)oxyl]-5-pyridyl]carbamoyl]-6-trifluoromethylindone (SB 243213) (1 mg/kg) reduced the oral responses elicited by specific doses of both agonists (0.1 mg/kg apomorphine; 0.5 mg/kg quinpirole). After having confirmed that the oral bouts induced by quinpirole 0.5 mg/kg were blocked by another 5-HT2C antagonist (6-chloro-5-methyl-1-[6-(2-methylpiridin-3-yloxy)pyridine-3-yl carbamoyl] indoline (SB 242084), 1 mg/kg), we mapped the changes in neuronal activity in numerous sub-territories of the basal ganglia using c-Fos expression. We found a marked increase of c-Fos expression in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in combining quinpirole (0.5 mg/kg) with either SB 243213 or SB 242084. In a parallel set of electrophysiological experiments, the same combination of SB 243213/quinpirole produced an irregular pattern of discharge and an increase in the firing rate of STN neurons. Finally, it was shown that upon the electrical stimulation of the anterior cingulate cortex, quinpirole (0 …

Authors

Mélanie Lagière,Marion Bosc,Sara Whitestone,Abdelhamid Benazzouz,Abdeslam Chagraoui,Mark J Millan,Philippe De Deurwaerdère

Journal

International Journal of Molecular Sciences

Published Date

2020/11/12

Surgical management of deep brain stimulator infection without electrode removal: Report of two cases

Objective Stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus by implanted electrodes (deep brain stimulation [DBS]) is performed to suppress symptoms of Parkinson's disease. However, postoperative wound dehiscence and infection can require removal of the implanted electrode leads. This report describes treatment of intractable unilateral wound infection in two patients without removing the DBS device. Methods First, components of the DBS system were removed except for the electrode lead and thorough debridement of the infected wound was conducted. Second, the edges of the bone defect left by removal of DBS components were smoothed to eliminate dead space. Subsequently, the electrode lead was covered by using a pericranial-frontalis-muscle flap or a bi-pedicled-scalp flap with good blood supply. Closed intrawound continuous negative pressure and irrigation treatment was conducted for 1 week after the …

Authors

Hiroaki Tanaka,Hideaki Rikimaru,Yukiko Rikimaru-Nishi,Norihiro Muraoka,Mina Anegawa,Shoya Ueki,Ou Oishi,Kensuke Kiyokawa

Journal

Journal of Neurological Surgery Reports

Published Date

2020/1

Subthalamic nucleus and substantia nigra pars reticulata stimulation: the Grenoble experience

The objective of the Grenoble study was to provide alternative treatment for non-operable pharmaco-resistant epileptic patients. The subthalamic nucleus exerts an excitatory control on the nigral system. The surgical method was identical to the procedure used for the treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease cases by chronic stimula tion of subthalamic nucleus (STN). The STN is a target which is well known to neurostereotacti-cians in the movement disorders field. High frequency stimulation is a non-destructive method for target functional inhibition, already used extensively in parkinsonian patients and in dystonia. Electrodes were temporarily connected to a transcutaneous extension to allow recordings of EEG-type activity concomitantly with scalp EEG monitoring. Interictal spikes, as well as ictal epileptic discharges, were recorded simultaneously from all four electrode contacts. The preoperative seizure rat was …

Authors

Alim-Louis Benabid,Adnan Koudsie,Stephan Chabardes,Laurent Vercueil,Abdelhamid Benazzouz,Lorella Minotti,Jean-François Le Bas,Philippe Kahane,Anne de Saint Martin,Edouard Hirsch

Published Date

2020/8/26

Mechanisms of deep brain stimulation

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is widely used for the treatment of movement disorders including Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, and dystonia and, to a lesser extent, certain treatment-resistant neuropsychiatric disorders including obsessive-compulsive disorder. Rather than a single unifying mechanism, DBS likely acts via several, nonexclusive mechanisms including local and network-wide electrical and neurochemical effects of stimulation, modulation of oscillatory activity, synaptic plasticity, and, potentially, neuroprotection and neurogenesis. These different mechanisms vary in importance depending on the condition being treated and the target being stimulated. Here we review each of these in turn and illustrate how an understanding of these mechanisms is inspiring next-generation approaches to DBS.

Authors

Todd M Herrington,Jennifer J Cheng,Emad N Eskandar

Published Date

2016/1/1

Absence seizures in the GAERS model: subthalamic nucleus stimulation

This chapter presents the high frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus can trigger a nigro-striatal antiepileptic effect on absence-like seizures in Genetic Absence Epilepsy Rat of Strasbourg rats. Epilepsy is a term derived from the Greek word ‘epilepsia,’ which means ‘to seize.’ In current usage, epilepsy refers to a variety of neurological disorders characterized by recurrent seizures. Cortical dysgenesis (CD) is a human cause of epilepsy that has been well studied with animal models Disruption of any of the steps involved in the formation of the neocortex can result in CD. The tottering mouse exhibits features of generalized epilepsy including generalized spike-waves on EEG and absence-like seizures. ‘EL mice’ are the only genetic animal models that express seizure-associated damage to the hippocampus, a region of the brain commonly damaged by epilepsy in humans. The nigral control of epilepsy …

Authors

Alim-Louis Benabid,Laurent Vercueil,Karine Bressand,Maurice Dematteis,Abdelhamid Benazzouz,Lorella Minotti,Philippe Kahane

Published Date

2020/8/26

See List of Professors in Abdelhamid Benazzouz University(Université de Bordeaux)

Abdelhamid Benazzouz FAQs

What is Abdelhamid Benazzouz's h-index at Université de Bordeaux?

The h-index of Abdelhamid Benazzouz has been 33 since 2020 and 64 in total.

What are Abdelhamid Benazzouz's top articles?

The articles with the titles of

Usefulness of thalamic beta activity for closed-loop therapy in essential tremor

Neural tissue unit and use of such a unit for implantation into the nervous system of a mammal

Editorial Deep Brain Stimulation Issue 2 by Dr Yasin Temel & Dr Abdelhamid Benazzouz

Prelimbic cortical stimulation induces Antidepressant-like responses through Dopaminergic-Dependent and-Independent Mechanisms

Neuropathic pain modeling: Focus on synaptic and ion channel mechanisms

Cell-penetrating, antioxidant SELENOT mimetic protects dopaminergic neurons and ameliorates motor dysfunction in Parkinson's disease animal models

Covid‐19 infection and parkinsonism: is there a link?

Bifenthrin insecticide promotes oxidative stress and increases inflammatory mediators in human neuroblastoma cells through NF-kappaB pathway

...

are the top articles of Abdelhamid Benazzouz at Université de Bordeaux.

What are Abdelhamid Benazzouz's research interests?

The research interests of Abdelhamid Benazzouz are: Neurosciences, Maladie de Parkinson

What is Abdelhamid Benazzouz's total number of citations?

Abdelhamid Benazzouz has 22,902 citations in total.

What are the co-authors of Abdelhamid Benazzouz?

The co-authors of Abdelhamid Benazzouz are Erwan Bezard, Jérôme Baufreton, Tjitske Ciska Heida.

    Co-Authors

    H-index: 98
    Erwan Bezard

    Erwan Bezard

    Université de Bordeaux

    H-index: 28
    Jérôme Baufreton

    Jérôme Baufreton

    Université de Bordeaux

    H-index: 24
    Tjitske Ciska Heida

    Tjitske Ciska Heida

    Universiteit Twente

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