Abdelhakim Salem

Abdelhakim Salem

Helsingin yliopisto

H-index: 18

Europe-Finland

Abdelhakim Salem Information

University

Helsingin yliopisto

Position

___

Citations(all)

912

Citations(since 2020)

658

Cited By

455

hIndex(all)

18

hIndex(since 2020)

16

i10Index(all)

24

i10Index(since 2020)

23

Email

University Profile Page

Helsingin yliopisto

Abdelhakim Salem Skills & Research Interests

oncology

immunotherapy

vasculogenic mimicry

histamine H4 receptor

personalized medicine

Top articles of Abdelhakim Salem

Ex vivo evaluation of antiangiogenic drugs in oral cancer: Potential implications for targeting vasculogenic mimicry

Ex vivo evaluation of antiangiogenic drugs in oral cancer: Potential implications for targeting vasculogenic mimicry — University of Helsinki Skip to main navigation Skip to search Skip to main content University of Helsinki Home University of Helsinki Logo English Svenska Suomi Home Persons Publications Projects Research Infrastructures Research Units Datasets Activities Prizes Press/Media Search by expertise, name or affiliation Ex vivo evaluation of antiangiogenic drugs in oral cancer: Potential implications for targeting vasculogenic mimicry Roosa AM Hujanen, Kari Eklund, Abdelhakim Salem Clinicum HUS Inflammation Center Department of Medicine Doctoral Programme in Clinical Research Doctoral Programme in Biomedicine Research output: Contribution to journal › Article › Scientific › peer-review Overview Original language English Journal Anticancer Research ISSN 0250-7005 Publication status …

Authors

Roosa AM Hujanen,Kari Eklund,Abdelhakim Salem

Journal

Anticancer Research

Published Date

2024/3/28

Zebrafish larvae as a model for studying the impact of oral bacterial vesicles on tumor growth and metastasis

Zebrafish larvae as a model for studying the impact of oral bacterial vesicles on tumor growth and metastasis — University of Helsinki Skip to main navigation Skip to search Skip to main content University of Helsinki Home University of Helsinki Logo English Svenska Suomi Home Persons Publications Projects Research Infrastructures Research Units Datasets Activities Prizes Press/Media Search by expertise, name or affiliation Zebrafish larvae as a model for studying the impact of oral bacterial vesicles on tumor growth and metastasis Marjut Annika Metsäniitty, Saika Prerona Hasnat, Carina Ohman, Kari Eklund, Jan Oscarsson, Abdelhakim Salem HUS Inflammation Center Department of Medicine Doctoral Programme in Clinical Research Doctoral Programme in Biomedicine Clinicum Doctoral Programme in Oral Sciences Research output: Contribution to journal › Article › Scientific › peer-review Overview Original …

Authors

Marjut Annika Metsäniitty,Saika Prerona Hasnat,Carina Ohman,Kari Eklund,Jan Oscarsson,Abdelhakim Salem

Journal

Cellular Oncology

Published Date

2024/3/3

Extracellular vesicles from Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans exhibit potential antitumorigenic effects in oral cancer: A comparative ex vivo study

Extracellular vesicles from Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans exhibit potential antitumorigenic effects in oral cancer: A comparative ex vivo study — University of Helsinki Skip to main navigation Skip to search Skip to main content University of Helsinki Home University of Helsinki Logo English Svenska Suomi Home Persons Publications Projects Research Infrastructures Research Units Datasets Activities Prizes Press/Media Search by expertise, name or affiliation Extracellular vesicles from Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans exhibit potential antitumorigenic effects in oral cancer: A comparative ex vivo study Marjut Annika Metsäniitty, Shrabon Tanveer Hasnat, Carina Ohman, Kari Eklund, Jan Oscarsson, Abdelhakim Salem Clinicum HUS Inflammation Center Department of Medicine Doctoral Programme in Clinical Research Doctoral Programme in Biomedicine Doctoral Programme in Oral Sciences …

Authors

Marjut Annika Metsäniitty,Shrabon Tanveer Hasnat,Carina Ohman,Kari Eklund,Jan Oscarsson,Abdelhakim Salem

Journal

International Microbiology

Published Date

2024/2/15

Identity matters: cancer stem cells and tumour plasticity in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) represents frequent yet aggressive tumours that encompass complex ecosystems of stromal and neoplastic components including a dynamic population of cancer stem cells (CSCs). Recently, research in the field of CSCs has gained increased momentum owing in part to their role in tumourigenicity, metastasis, therapy resistance and relapse. We provide herein a comprehensive assessment of the latest progress in comprehending CSC plasticity, including newly discovered influencing factors and their possible application in HNSCC. We further discuss the dynamic interplay of CSCs within tumour microenvironment considering our evolving appreciation of the contribution of oral microbiota and the pressing need for relevant models depicting their features. In sum, CSCs and tumour plasticity represent an exciting and expanding battleground with great …

Authors

Abdelhakim Salem,Tuula Salo

Published Date

2023/1

The prognostic influence of lymphatic endothelium–specific hyaluronan receptor 1 in cancer: A systematic review

Lymphangiogenesis is a key process in cancer development and metastasis. Lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor 1 (LYVE‐1) is a widely used marker for lymphatic endothelial cells (LEC), which also mediates immune and cancer cell migration. Recently, LYVE‐1–positive tumor cells were shown to acquire LEC‐like phenotype and exploit this receptor for lymphatic dissemination. Furthermore, selective targeting of LYVE‐1 impaired the growth of cancer‐related vasculature and reduced metastasis in vivo, signifying its role in therapeutic and prognostic applications. Although numerous studies have investigated the role of LYVE‐1 in cancer, a unifying detailed review of its prognostic utility is lacking to date. Thus, we compiled and critically appraised evidence from clinical studies comprising a total of 2352 patients diagnosed with different types of cancer and using a variety of experimental approaches …

Authors

Sini Karinen,Roosa Hujanen,Tuula Salo,Abdelhakim Salem

Published Date

2022/1

Nothing to sneeze at: Histamine and histamine receptors in oral carcinogenesis

Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), the most common oral malignancy, shows an increasing rate of incidence worldwide. In spite of the recent advances in cancer research, OSCC therapy continues to have unfavourable outcomes, and thus, patient's prognosis remains relatively poor. Current research has been devoted to identifying novel therapeutic targets also in the tumour microenvironment (TME). Histamine and its G‐protein‐coupled receptors (H1R‐H4R) play vital roles in multiple cancer‐associated processes in TME, where histamine is mainly produced by mast cells. However, oral epithelial cells were recently shown to produce low concentrations of histamine in autocrine and paracrine modes. These findings, together with the discovery of the high‐affinity histamine H4 receptor, have led to a massive increase in our understanding of histamine functions. In this review, we aim to summarize the most …

Authors

Abdelhakim Salem,Tuula Salo

Published Date

2021/7

Oral microbiota—A new frontier in the pathogenesis and management of head and neck cancers

Simple Summary Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a group of common and aggressive tumors. Recently, oral microbiota has been credited as an important player in carcinogenesis. However, the available knowledge is not always consistent and sometimes conflicting. Therefore, the present comprehensive systematic review of the current clinical reports was conducted to evaluate the role of oral microbiota in HNSCC. Importantly, this study addresses whether oral microbiota targeting could provide diagnostic, prognostic or therapeutic utility in cancer patients. We also discussed the current limitations of this newly emerging field and the potential related strategies for the management of patients with HNSCC and possibly other solid tumors. Abstract Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) comprises the majority of tumors in head and neck tissues. The prognosis of HNSCC has not significantly improved for decades, signifying the need for new diagnostic and therapeutic targets. Recent evidence suggests that oral microbiota is associated with carcinogenesis. Thus, we conducted a comprehensive systematic review to evaluate the current evidence regarding the role of oral microbiota in HNSCC and whether their targeting may confer diagnostic, prognostic or therapeutic utility. Following the screening of 233 publications retrieved from multiple databases, 34 eligible studies comprising 2469 patients were compiled and critically appraised. Importantly, many oral pathogens, such as Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum were linked to certain oral potentially …

Authors

Marjut Metsäniitty,Shrabon Hasnat,Tuula Salo,Abdelhakim Salem

Published Date

2021/12/23

The effect of interleukin‐17F on vasculogenic mimicry in oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma

Oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC) is one of the most common cancers worldwide and is characterized by early metastasis and poor prognosis. Recently, we reported that extracellular interleukin‐17F (IL‐17F) correlates with better disease‐specific survival in OTSCC patients and has promising anticancer effects in vitro. Vasculogenic mimicry (VM) is the formation of an alternative vasculogenic system by aggressive tumor cells, which is implicated in treatment failure and poor survival of cancer patients. We sought to confirm the formation of VM in OTSCC and to investigate the effect of IL‐17F on VM formation. Here, we showed that highly invasive OTSCC cells (HSC‐3 and SAS) form tube‐like VM on Matrigel similar to those formed by human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Interestingly, the less invasive cells (SCC‐25) did not form any VM structures. Droplet‐digital PCR, FACS, and …

Authors

Rabeia Almahmoudi,Abdelhakim Salem,Elin Hadler‐Olsen,Gunbjørg Svineng,Tuula Salo,Ahmed Al‐Samadi

Journal

Cancer Science

Published Date

2021/6

Angiogenesis and Angiogenesis Inhibitors in Oral Cancer

This special issue of Frontiers in Oral Health sheds light on recent research regarding the tumor-related angiogenesis in oral cancer, including the present challenges of anticancer therapy targeting angiogenesis. Indeed, angiogenesis is a hallmark of solid tumors and it has important prognostic and therapeutic implications in cancer patients. This issue covers different relevant topics ranging from characterizing angiogenic signaling pathways to newly suggested paradigms of tumor neoangiogenesis revealing new putative therapeutic targets. Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a common cancer worldwide, and the incidence has been rising steadily. Of great concern is the growing proportion of younger patients without a history of smoking or alcohol abuse among OSCC patients. Currently, the primary treatment of OSCC patients comprises surgery and (chemo) radiotherapy, either alone or in combination. Other clinically approved approaches, such as targeted-and immuno-therapies, remain inconsistently applied as a first-line treatment for OSCC patients. Unfortunately, despite the advancement in cancer management, these treatments offer limited efficacy and the 5-year survival rate among OSCC patients is around 50–60%[1, 2].Angiogenesis is a key process in the tumorigenesis of solid cancers, promoting tumor growth, recurrence and metastasis. A large body of evidence suggested that targeting angiogenesis could provide a clinical benefit in the treatment of solid tumors [3]. Thus, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the first angiogenesis inhibitor for cancer treatment—bevacizumab (Avastin R)—in February 2004 …

Authors

Abdelhakim Salem,Elin Hadler-Olsen,Ahmed Al-Samadi

Published Date

2021/12/15

The effect of fascin 1 inhibition on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells

Fascin 1 plays important pro‐metastatic roles in head and neck carcinoma (HNSCC) migration, invasion, and metastasis. However, limited advancement in targeting metastasis remains a major obstacle in improving HNSCC patients’ survival. Therefore, we assessed the therapeutic potential of fascin 1 targeted inhibition and its potential prognostic value in HNSCC patients. Using in vitro and in vivo approaches, we investigated the effect of compound G2, a novel fascin 1 inhibitor, on HNSCC cells migration, invasion, and metastasis. High‐throughput screening (HTS) was used to assess cytotoxic activity of compound G2 alone or combined with irradiation. We also evaluated the prognostic potential of fascin 1 in HNSCC patients. Interestingly, compound G2 reduced carcinoma cells migration and invasion in vitro and inhibited metastasis in vivo. Moreover, HTS revealed a modest cytotoxic activity of the compound G2 …

Authors

Awais Wahab,Aini Hyytiäinen,Wafa Wahbi,Katja Tuomainen,Sanni Tervo,Pablo Conesa‐Zamora,Laura Jauhiainen,Laura K Mäkinen,Timo Paavonen,Sanna Toppila‐Salmi,Abdelhakim Salem,Alhadi Almangush,Tuula Salo,Ahmed Al‐Samadi

Journal

European journal of oral sciences

Published Date

2021/12

Vasculogenic Mimicry in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma—Time to Take Notice

Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a group of common cancers characterized by a swift growth pattern, early metastasis, and dismal 5-year survival rates. Despite the recent advances in cancer management, the multimodality approach is not effective in eradicating HNSCC. Moreover, the clinical response to the antiangiogenic therapy remains considerably limited in HNSCC patients, suggesting that tumor perfusion can take place through other non-angiogenic pathways. Tumor cell-induced angiogenesis is one of the main hallmarks of cancer. However, at the end of the previous millennium, a new paradigm of tumor cell-associated neovascularization has been reported in human melanoma cells. This new phenomenon, which was named “vasculogenic mimicry” or “vascular mimicry” (VM), describes the ability of aggressively growing tumor cells to form perfusable, matrix-rich, vessel-like networks in 3-dimensional matrices in vitro. Similar matrix-rich VM networks were also identified in tissue samples obtained from cancer patients. To date, myriad studies have reported intriguing features of VM in a wide variety of cancers including HNSCC. We aim in this mini-review to summarize the current evidence regarding the phenomenon of VM in HNSCC—from the available detection protocols and potentially involved mechanisms, to its prognostic value and the present limitations.

Authors

Abdelhakim Salem,Tuula Salo

Published Date

2021/3/31

Tumour cells express functional lymphatic endothelium-specific hyaluronan receptor in vitro and in vivo: Lymphatic mimicry promotes oral oncogenesis?

Lymphatic metastasis represents the main route of tumour cell dissemination in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Yet, there are no FDA-approved therapeutics targeting cancer-related lymphangiogenesis to date. The lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronic acid receptor 1 (LYVE-1), a specific lymphatic marker, is associated with poor survival in OSCC patients. In this study, we present a potential novel mechanism of lymphatic metastasis in OSCC—lymphatic mimicry (LM), a process whereby tumour cells form cytokeratin+/LYVE-1+, but podoplanin-negative, mosaic endothelial-like vessels. LM was detected in one-third (20/57; 35.08%) of randomly selected OSCC patients. The LM-positive patients had shorter overall survival (OS) compared to LM-negative group albeit not statistically significant. Highly-metastatic tumour cells formed distinct LM structures in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, the siRNA-mediated …

Authors

Sini Karinen,Krista Juurikka,Roosa Hujanen,Wafa Wahbi,Elin Hadler-Olsen,Gunbjørg Svineng,Kari K Eklund,Tuula Salo,Pirjo Åström,Abdelhakim Salem

Journal

Oncogenesis

Published Date

2021/3/5

Comparative analysis of vascular mimicry in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: in vitro and in vivo approaches

Simple Summary Head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) are common and among the deadliest neoplasms worldwide, wherein metastasis represents the main cause of the poor survival outcomes. Tumour cells require blood vessels in order to grow and invade the surrounding tissues. Recently, a new phenomenon termed vascular mimicry (VM) was introduced, whereby tumour cells can independently form vessel-like structures to promote their growth and metastasis. VM has been characterized in many solid tumours, including HNSCC. A large body of research evidence shows that patients with positive VM exhibit poor treatment response and dismal survival rates. Thus, VM represents a promising therapeutic and prognostic target in cancer. However, there is limited knowledge regarding the identification of VM in HNSCC (in vitro and in vivo) and what factors may influence such a phenomenon. This study aims to address these limitations, which may facilitate the therapeutic exploitation of VM in HNSCC. Abstract Tissue vasculature provides the main conduit for metastasis in solid tumours including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Vascular mimicry (VM) is an endothelial cell (EC)-independent neovascularization pattern, whereby tumour cells generate a perfusable vessel-like meshwork. Yet, despite its promising clinical utility, there are limited approaches to better identify VM in HNSCC and what factors may influence such a phenomenon in vitro. Therefore, we employed different staining procedures to assess their utility in identifying VM in tumour sections, wherein mosaic …

Authors

Roosa Hujanen,Rabeia Almahmoudi,Tuula Salo,Abdelhakim Salem

Journal

Cancers

Published Date

2021/9/23

Students Perceptions of Assessment and Its Potential Effect on Learning and Study Motivation: A Trial Study at the University of Helsinki

Students Perceptions of Assessment and Its Potential Effect on Learning and Study Motivation: A Trial Study at the University of Helsinki — University of Helsinki Skip to main navigation Skip to search Skip to main content University of Helsinki Home University of Helsinki Logo English Svenska Suomi Home Persons Publications Projects Research Infrastructures Research Units Datasets Activities Prizes Press / Media Search by expertise, name or affiliation Students Perceptions of Assessment and Its Potential Effect on Learning and Study Motivation: A Trial Study at the University of Helsinki Abdelhakim Salem, Fathiah Zakham, Henning Kirschenmann, Dorothee Cambou Clinicum Research output: Contribution to journal › Article › Scientific › peer-review Overview Original language English Journal Education Sciences ISSN 2227-7102 Publication status In preparation - 1 Aug 2021 MoE publication type A1 Journal …

Authors

Abdelhakim Salem,Fathiah Zakham,Henning Kirschenmann,Dorothee Cambou

Journal

Education Sciences

Published Date

2021/8/1

Role of Cyclooxygenase-2 in Head and Neck Cancers

The cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is a potent enzyme that converts arachidonic acid to prostaglandins (PG), including PGE2, a key mediator of inflammation and angiogenesis. Importantly, COX-2 is activated in response to inflammatory stimuli, where it is also believed to promote the development and progression of head and neck cancers (HNC). COX-2 can mediate its protumorigenic effect through various mechanisms such as inducing cell proliferation, inhibition of apoptosis, and suppressing the host’s immune response. Furthermore, COX-2 can induce the production of vascular endothelial growth factors, hence promoting angiogenesis. Indeed, the ability of COX-2 inhibitors to selectively restrict the proliferation of tumor cells and mediating apoptosis provides promising therapeutic targets for cancer patients. Thus, in this comprehensive review, we summarized the reported differential expression patterns of COX-2 in different stages of head and neck carcinogenesis—from potentially premalignant lesions to invasive carcinomas. Furthermore, we examined the available meta-analysis evidence for COX-2 role in the carcinogenesis of HNC. Finally, further understanding of the biological processes of COX-2 and its role in orchestrating cell proliferation, apoptosis and angiogenesis may give therapeutically beneficial insight to develop the management plan of HNC patients and improve their clinical outcomes.

Authors

Ellen Frejborg,Tuula Salo,Abdelhakim Salem

Published Date

2020/11/3

The prognostic value of toll-like receptors in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a group of tumours which exhibit low 5 year survival rates. Thus, there is an urgent need to identify biomarkers that may improve the clinical utility of patients with HNSCC. Emerging studies support a role of toll-like receptors (TLRs) in carcinogenesis. Therefore, this systematic review and meta-analysis was performed to assess the prognostic value of TLR immunoexpression in HNSCC patients. We compiled the results of thirteen studies comprising 1825 patients, of which six studies were deemed qualified for quantitative synthesis. The higher immunoexpression of TLR-1 to 5 and 9 was associated with a worsening of the clinical parameters of patients with HNSCC. Furthermore, induced levels of TLR-3, 4, 5, 7 and 9 were found to predict the patients’ survival time. The meta-analysis revealed that TLR-7 overexpression is associated with a decreased mortality risk in HNSCC patients (HR 0.51; 95%CI 0.13–0.89; I2 34.6%), while a higher expression of TLR-5 predicted shorter, but non-significant, survival outcome. In conclusion, this review suggests that TLRs may represent some prognostic value for patients with HNSCC. However, due to small sample sizes and other inherent methodological limitations, more well designed studies across different populations are still needed before TLRs can be recommended as a reliable clinical risk-stratification tool.

Authors

Shrabon Hasnat,Roosa Hujanen,Bright I Nwaru,Tuula Salo,Abdelhakim Salem

Published Date

2020/9/30

No detection of TSH or TSHR in oral lichen planus lesions in patients with or without hypothyroidism

Objective: An association between hypothyroidism (HT) and oral lichen planus (OLP) has been reported. However, the mechanisms that could explain this association remain unresolved. This study aimed to evaluate the expression of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) in healthy oral mucosa and in OLP lesions of individuals with and without HT.Material and methods: Immunohistochemical expression of TSH and TSHR was studied in oral mucosal biopsies obtained from 14 OLP patients with HT, 14 OLP patients without HT and 10 healthy controls without oral mucosal lesions. Gene expression of TSHR was investigated by using three different PCR techniques in oral mucosal samples from 7 OLP patients with HT, 3 OLP patients without HT, 9 healthy controls and in cultured human oral epithelial cells. Gene expression of TSH was examined by employing 2 PCR …

Authors

Mari Vehviläinen,Abdelhakim Salem,Muhammad Yasir Asghar,Tuula Salo,Maria Siponen

Journal

Acta Odontologica Scandinavica

Published Date

2020/7/3

Commentary: Pathophysiological Role of Histamine H4 Receptor in Cancer: Therapeutic Implications

The past two decades have witnessed a substantial increase in our understanding of histamine interaction and functions. The main factor propelling pharmacological interests in histamine research is its pleiotropic pathophysiological actions, which have led to the development and marketing of many successful medications for immune and gastrointestinal disorders (Tiligada and Ennis, 2020). A large body of research evidence has recently revealed a crucial role of histamine in cancer-related processes such as cell cycle and proliferation, apoptosis and invasion (Massari et al., 2020). Moreover, the discovery of the latest G protein-coupled receptor of histamine, histamine H4 receptor (H4R), and its potent immunomodulatory effect, has opened up new perspectives in cancer research (Massari et al., 2020). Besides its distribution on immune cells, H4R was also differentially expressed in a wide variety of cancers, cancer models, and tumor cell lines. In this regard, we read with great interest the elegant work of Nicoud et al., which comprehensively reviewed the recent research on the pathophysiological role of H4R in cancer (Nicoud et al., 2019). The authors summarized the current knowledge on H4R pharmacology, clinical applications, and differential expression in many in vitro and in vivo experimental models of cancer as well as in cancer patient cohorts. Importantly, authors concluded that numerous preclinical data indicated with no doubt the participation of H4R in tumor progression and signify the potential of exploiting this receptor for cancer treatment. In this respect, we would like to briefly highlight the involvement of H4R in oral (or mobile …

Authors

Abdelhakim Salem,Tuula Salo

Published Date

2020/6/5

Role of cyclooxygenase-2 in head and neck tumorigenesis

The cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is a potent enzyme that converts arachidonic acid to prostaglandins (PG), including PGE2, a key mediator of inflammation and angiogenesis. Importantly, COX-2 is activated in response to inflammatory stimuli, where it is also believed to promote the development and progression of head and neck cancers (HNC). COX-2 can mediate its protumorigenic effect through various mechanisms, such as inducing cell proliferation, inhibition of apoptosis, and suppressing the host’s immune response. Furthermore, COX-2 can induce the production of vascular endothelial growth factors, hence, promoting angiogenesis. Indeed, the ability of COX-2 inhibitors to selectively restrict the proliferation of tumor cells and mediating apoptosis provides promising therapeutic targets for cancer patients. Thus, in this comprehensive review, we summarized the reported differential expression patterns of COX-2 in different stages of head and neck carcinogenesis—from potentially premalignant lesions to invasive carcinomas. Furthermore, we examined the available meta-analysis evidence for COX-2 role in the carcinogenesis of HNC. Finally, further understanding of the biological processes of COX-2 and its role in orchestrating cell proliferation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis may give therapeutically beneficial insight to develop the management plan of HNC patients and improve their clinical outcomes.

Authors

Ellen Frejborg,Tuula Salo,Abdelhakim Salem

Published Date

2020/12/3

Vasculogenic mimicry: a promising prognosticator in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and esophageal cancer? A systematic review and meta-analysis

Vasculogenic mimicry (VM) is an intratumoral microcirculation pattern formed by aggressive cancer cells, which mediates tumor growth. In this study, we compiled the evidence from studies evaluating whether positive VM status can serve as a prognostic factor to patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) or esophagus (ESCC). Comprehensive systematic searches were conducted using Cochrane Library, Ovid Medline, PubMed, and Scopus databases. We appraised the quality of studies and the potential for bias, and performed random-effect meta-analysis to assess the prognostic impact of VM on the overall survival (OS). Seven studies with 990 patients were eligible, where VM was detected in 34.24% of patients. Positive-VM was strongly associated with poor OS (hazard ratio = 0.50; 95% confidence interval: 0.38–0.64), which remained consistent following the subgroup analysis of the studies. Furthermore, VM was associated with more metastasis to local lymph nodes and more advanced stages of HNSCC and ESCC. In conclusion, this study provides clear evidence showing that VM could serve as a promising prognosticator for patients with either HNSCC or ESCC. Further studies are warranted to assess how VM can be implemented as a reliable staging element in clinical practice and whether it could provide a new target for therapeutic intervention.

Authors

Roosa Hujanen,Rabeia Almahmoudi,Sini Karinen,Bright I Nwaru,Tuula Salo,Abdelhakim Salem

Published Date

2020/2/24

Abdelhakim Salem FAQs

What is Abdelhakim Salem's h-index at Helsingin yliopisto?

The h-index of Abdelhakim Salem has been 16 since 2020 and 18 in total.

What are Abdelhakim Salem's top articles?

The articles with the titles of

Ex vivo evaluation of antiangiogenic drugs in oral cancer: Potential implications for targeting vasculogenic mimicry

Zebrafish larvae as a model for studying the impact of oral bacterial vesicles on tumor growth and metastasis

Extracellular vesicles from Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans exhibit potential antitumorigenic effects in oral cancer: A comparative ex vivo study

Identity matters: cancer stem cells and tumour plasticity in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

The prognostic influence of lymphatic endothelium–specific hyaluronan receptor 1 in cancer: A systematic review

Nothing to sneeze at: Histamine and histamine receptors in oral carcinogenesis

Oral microbiota—A new frontier in the pathogenesis and management of head and neck cancers

The effect of interleukin‐17F on vasculogenic mimicry in oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma

...

are the top articles of Abdelhakim Salem at Helsingin yliopisto.

What are Abdelhakim Salem's research interests?

The research interests of Abdelhakim Salem are: oncology, immunotherapy, vasculogenic mimicry, histamine H4 receptor, personalized medicine

What is Abdelhakim Salem's total number of citations?

Abdelhakim Salem has 912 citations in total.

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