abdelhak El Amrani

abdelhak El Amrani

Université de Rennes 1

H-index: 26

Europe-France

Professor Information

University

Université de Rennes 1

Position

___

Citations(all)

3707

Citations(since 2020)

1522

Cited By

2844

hIndex(all)

26

hIndex(since 2020)

17

i10Index(all)

37

i10Index(since 2020)

26

Email

University Profile Page

Université de Rennes 1

Research & Interests List

MicroRNAs

Microbiome

Ecological Engineering

Stress Tolerance

Functional Genomics.

Top articles of abdelhak El Amrani

Recent allopolyploidy alters Spartina microRNA expression in response to xenobiotic-induced stress

Environmental contamination by xenobiotics represents a major threat for natural ecosystems and public health. In response, xenobiotic detoxification is a fundamental trait of organisms for developmental plasticity and stress tolerance, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood in plants. To decipher this process, we explored the consequences of allopolyploidy on xenobiotic tolerance in the genus Spartina Schreb. Specifically, we focused on microRNAs (miRNAs) owing to their central function in the regulation of gene expression patterns, including responses to stress. Small RNA-Seq was conducted on the parents S. alterniflora and S. maritima, their F1 hybrid S. x townsendii and the allopolyploid S. anglica under phenanthrene-induced stress (phe), a model Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) compound. Differentially expressed miRNAs in response to phe were specifically identified …

Authors

Armand Cavé-Radet,Armel Salmon,Loup Tran Van Canh,Richard L Moyle,Lara-Simone Pretorius,Oscar Lima,Malika L Ainouche,Abdelhak El Amrani

Journal

Plant Molecular Biology

Published Date

2023/2

Plant miRNAs in the rhizosphere target microbial genes

Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that control target gene expression, through sequence complementarity. Their roles in plants vary from regulating developmental processes to responding to abiotic and biotic stresses. Recently, small RNAs have been shown to play important roles in cross-kingdom communication, notably in plant-pathogen relationships. Plant miRNAs were even shown to regulate gene expression in the gut microbiota. Thus, we hypothesised that the same process happens in the rhizosphere which contributes to shaping plant-associated microbial communities.Results To explore these questions, we performed small RNA sequencing in search of miRNAs in the rhizosphere of two evolutionarily distant plants, Arabidopsis thaliana and Brachypodium distachyon. This revealed the presence of specific and shared rhizospheric plant miRNAs, which were all absent in unplanted soils. A subset of these miRNAs were also detected inside rhizospheric bacteria, but were missing in bacteria from unplanted soils, suggesting bacterial uptake of surrounding plant miRNAs. Furthermore, an in silicoanalysis indicated potential targets of these rhizospheric miRNAs in plant-associated bacterial genomes. To examine the function of these miRNAs, A. thaliana mutants, affected in their miRNA and/or siRNA (small interfering RNA) biosynthesis, were grown. Their rhizospheric microbial communities were significantly disrupted in comparison with wild-type plants. Additionally, confronting synthetic rhizospheric miRNAs with bacterial cultures resulted in modulation of gene expression, suggesting a functional role of plant …

Authors

Harriet Middleton,Cécile Monard,Virginie Daburon,Emmanuel Clostres,Jessica Dozois,Julien Tremblay,Étienne Yergeau,Abdelhak El Amrani

Published Date

2023/9/28

Are nanoplastics potentially toxic for plants and rhizobiota? Current knowledge and recommendations

Soil is now becoming a reservoir of plastics in response to global production, use/disposal patterns and low recovery rates. Their degradation is caused by numerous processes, and this degradation leads to the formation and release of plastic nanoparticles, i.e., nanoplastics. The occurrence of nanoplastics in the soil is expected to both directly and indirectly impact its properties and functioning. Nanoplastics may directly impact the physiology and development of living organisms, especially plants, e.g., by modifying their production yield. Nanoplastics can also indirectly modify the physicochemical properties of the soil and, as a result, favour the release of related contaminants (organic or inorganic) and have an impact on soil biota, and therefore have a negative effect on the functioning of rhizospheres. However all these results have to be taken carefully since performed with polymer nano-bead not representative …

Authors

Delphine Masson,Mathieu Pédrot,Mélanie Davranche,Francisco Cabello-Hurtado,Nataliia Ryzhenko,Abdelhak El Amrani,Aurélie Wahl,Julien Gigault

Published Date

2023/6/29

Analysis of Small Non-coding RNAs as Signaling Intermediates of Environmentally Integrated Responses to Abiotic Stress

Research to date on abiotic stress responses in plants has been largely focused on the plant itself, but current knowledge indicates that microorganisms can interact with and help plants during periods of abiotic stress. In our research, we aim to investigate the interkingdom communication between the plant root and the rhizo-microbiota. Our investigation showed that miRNA plays a pivotal role in this interkingdom communication. Here, we describe a protocol for the analysis of miRNA secreted by the plant root, which includes all of the steps from the isolation of the miRNA to the bioinformatics analysis. Because of their short nucleotide length, Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) library preparation from miRNAs can be challenging due to the presence of dimer adapter contaminants. Therefore, we highlight some strategies we adopt to inhibit the generation of dimer adapters during library preparation. Current …

Authors

Christophe Penno,Julien Tremblay,Mary O’Connell Motherway,Virginie Daburon,Abdelhak El Amrani

Published Date

2023/3/22

Plants release miRNAs in the rhizosphere, targeting microbial genes

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that control target gene expression, through sequence complementarity. Their roles in plants vary from regulating developmental processes to responding to abiotic and biotic stresses. Recently, small RNAs have been shown to play important roles in cross-kingdom communication, notably in plant-pathogen relationships. Plant miRNAs were even shown to regulate gene expression in the gut microbiota. Thus, we hypothesised that the same process happens in the rhizosphere which contributes to shaping plant microbial communities. To explore these questions, we performed small RNA sequencing in search of miRNAs in the rhizosphere of evolutionarily distant plants, Arabidopsis thaliana and Brachypodium distachyon. This revealed the presence of specific and shared rhizospheric plant miRNAs, which were all absent in unplanted soils. A subset of these miRNAs were also detected inside rhizospheric bacteria, but were missing in bacteria from unplanted soils, suggesting bacterial uptake of surrounding plant miRNAs. Furthermore, an in silico analysis indicated potential targets of these rhizospheric miRNAs in plant-associated bacterial genomes. To examine the function of these miRNAs, A. thaliana mutants, affected in their miRNA and/or siRNA (small interfering RNA) biosynthesis, were grown. Their rhizospheric microbial communities were significantly disrupted in comparison with wild-type plants. This work makes an important contribution to the field of rhizospheric plant-microbe interactions and offers some significant insights into the potential of plant miRNAs for microbiota engineering.

Authors

Harriet Middleton,Cécile Monard,Virginie Daburon,Emmanuel Clostres,Julien Tremblay,Étienne Yergeau,Abdelhak El Amrani

Journal

bioRxiv

Published Date

2022/7/28

Wide genome transcription and metabolome profiles reprogrammed by sucrose under xenobiotic constraints

Plants have developed strategies to adapt quickly to environmental changes. However, the regulation of these adaptive responses and coordination of signals network remains poorly understood for many environmental constraints. Indeed, signalling molecules play a central role in environmental stimuli and may coordinate plants development under environmental cues. Sucrose is the major transport carbohydrate in higher plants, in addition to its metabolic role; recent investigations suggested that sucrose impact the plasticity of plant development by controlling gene expression. Sucrose was also suggested as a ROS scavenger and as a signalling molecule. In this paper we showed that sucrose mitigated phenanthrene induced stress. Since, exogenous sucrose allowed growth and chlorophyll accumulation in the presence of high phenanthrene concentrations, whereas Arabidopsis development was blocked and seedlings were unable to accumulate chlorophyll in the presence of phenanthrene solely. To decipher the earlier molecular changes involved in sucrose tolerance to phenanthrene, wide transcriptional genes analysis and targeted metabolic profiling were carried out. We showed that sucrose driving plant response was associated with a deep reconfiguration of both genes expression and metabolites accumulation during the first hours of treatment, suggesting that sucrose, allowed plants to sustain the primary metabolism and to overcome the phenanthrene induced injuries.

Authors

Richard Berthomé,Anne-Sophie Dumas,Emilie Jarde,Nataliia Ryzhenko,Evangelos Barbas,Abdelhak El Amrani

Journal

bioRxiv

Published Date

2022

Rhizospheric Plant–Microbe Interactions: miRNAs as a Key Mediator

The importance of microorganisms in plant development, nutrition, and stress resistance is unquestioned and has led to a more holistic approach of plant–microbe interactions, under the holobiont concept. The structure of the plant microbiota is often described as host driven, especially in the rhizosphere, where microbial communities are shaped by diverse rhizodeposits. Gradually, this anthropogenic vision is fading and being replaced by the idea that plants and microorganisms co-shape the plant microbiota. Through coevolution, plants and microbes have developed cross-kingdom communication channels. Here, we propose that miRNAs are crucial mediators of plant–microbe interactions and microbiota shaping in the rhizosphere. Moreover, we suggest, as an alternative to generally unsuccessful strategies based on microbial inoculants, miRNAs as a promising tool for novel holobiont engineering.

Authors

Harriet Middleton,Étienne Yergeau,Cécile Monard,Jean-Philippe Combier,Abdelhak El Amrani

Published Date

2021/2/1

Do specialized cells play a major role in organic xenobiotic detoxification in higher plants?

In the present work, we used a double cell screening approach based on phenanthrene (phe) epifluorescence histochemical localization and oxygen radical detection to generate new data about how some specialized cells are involved in tolerance to organic xenobiotics. Thereby, we bring new insights about phe [a common Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH)] cell specific detoxification, in two contrasting plant lineages thriving in different ecosystems. Our data suggest that in higher plants, detoxification may occur in specialized cells such as trichomes and pavement cells in Arabidopsis, and in the basal cells of salt glands in Spartina species. Such features were supported by a survey from the literature, and complementary data correlating the size of basal salt gland cells and tolerance abilities to PAHs previously reported between Spartina species. Furthermore, we conducted functional validation in two independent Arabidopsis trichomeless glabrous T-DNA mutant lines (GLABRA1 mutants). These mutants showed a sensitive phenotype under phe-induced stress in comparison with their background ecotypes without the mutation, indicating that trichomes are key structures involved in the detoxification of organic xenobiotics. Interestingly, trichomes and pavement cells are known to endoreduplicate, and we discussed the putative advantages given by endopolyploidy in xenobiotic detoxification abilities. The same feature concerning basal salt gland cells in Spartina has been raised. This similarity with detoxification in the endopolyploid liver cells of the animal system is included.

Authors

Armand Cave-Radet,Mokded Rabhi,Francis Gouttefangeas,Abdelhak El Amrani

Journal

Frontiers in Plant Science

Published Date

2020/7/9

Professor FAQs

What is abdelhak El Amrani's h-index at Université de Rennes 1?

The h-index of abdelhak El Amrani has been 17 since 2020 and 26 in total.

What are abdelhak El Amrani's research interests?

The research interests of abdelhak El Amrani are: MicroRNAs, Microbiome, Ecological Engineering, Stress Tolerance, Functional Genomics.

What is abdelhak El Amrani's total number of citations?

abdelhak El Amrani has 3,707 citations in total.

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