Abdelghafar Alkishe

Abdelghafar Alkishe

University of Kansas

H-index: 8

North America-United States

Professor Information

University

University of Kansas

Position

PhD student Ecology and Evolutionary Biology department

Citations(all)

399

Citations(since 2020)

389

Cited By

87

hIndex(all)

8

hIndex(since 2020)

7

i10Index(all)

6

i10Index(since 2020)

6

Email

University Profile Page

University of Kansas

Research & Interests List

Disease Ecology

Infectious diseases

Vector-borne disease

Ecological Niche Modeling.

Top articles of Abdelghafar Alkishe

Effects of occurrence data density on conservation prioritization strategies

Place-prioritization analyses are a means by which researchers can translate information on the geographic distributions of species into quantitative prioritizations of areas for biodiversity conservation action. Although several robust algorithms are now available to support this sort of analysis, their vulnerability to biases deriving from incomplete and imbalanced distributional information is not well understood. In this contribution, we took a well-sampled group (i.e., Icteridae or New World blackbirds) in an intensively sampled region (the contiguous continental United States), and developed a set of pseudo-experimental manipulations of occurrence data density—in effect, we created situations in which data density was reduced 10- or 100-fold, and situations in which data density varied 100-fold from region to region. The effects were marked: priority areas for conservation shifted, appeared, and disappeared as a …

Authors

Marlon E Cobos,Claudia Nunez-Penichet,Peter D Campbell,Jacob C Cooper,Fernando Machado-Stredel,Narayani Barve,Uzma Ashraf,Abdelghafar A Alkishe,Eric Ng'eno,Rahul Raveendran Nair,P Joser Atauchi,Adeola Adeboje,A Townsend Peterson

Journal

Biological Conservation

Published Date

2023/8/1

Ecological niche and potential geographic distributions of Dermacentor marginatus and Dermacentor reticulatus (Acari: Ixodidae) under current and future …

Dermacentor marginatus is a vector disease of both humans and animals and transmits the causative agents of Q fever (Coxiella burnetii) and the spotted fever group (Rickettsia raoultii and R. slovaca), as well as of Crimean–Congo hemorrhagic fever. Dermacentor reticulatus can transmit various pathogens such as Francisella tularensis, Babesia spp., tick encephalitis virus, Coxiella burnetii, Omsk hemorrhagic fever virus, and Rickettsia spp. and can cause serious skin lesions. Herein, ecological niche modeling (ENM) is used to characterize the niches of these two ticks and describe their potential distributional patterns under both current and future climate conditions, as a means of highlighting geographic distributional shifts that may be of public health importance. We assessed distributional implications of five general circulation models (GCMs), under two shared socio-economic pathways (SSP245 and SSP585) for the period 2041–2060. Predictions for D. marginatus showed broad suitable areas across western, central, and southern Europe, with potential for expansion in northern and eastern Europe. Dermacentor reticulatus has suitable areas across western, central, and northern Europe. Under future scenarios, new expansions were observed in parts of northern and eastern Europe and highland areas in central Europe. Despite broad overlap between the niches of the ticks, D. marginatus has a broader niche, which allows it to show greater stability in the face of the changing climate conditions. Areas of potential geographic distributional expansion for these species should be monitored for actual distributional shifts, which may have …

Authors

Abdelghafar Alkishe,Marlon E Cobos,Luis Osorio-Olvera,A Townsend Peterson

Journal

Web Ecology

Published Date

2022/7/5

Climate change influences on the geographic distributional potential of the spotted fever vectors Amblyomma maculatum and Dermacentor andersoni

Amblyomma maculatum (Gulf Coast tick), and Dermacentor andersoni (Rocky Mountain wood tick) are two North American ticks that transmit spotted fevers associated Rickettsia. Amblyomma maculatum transmits Rickettsia parkeri and Francisella tularensis, while D. andersoni transmits R. rickettsii, Anaplasma marginale, Coltivirus (Colorado tick fever virus), and F. tularensis. Increases in temperature causes mild winters and more extreme dry periods during summers, which will affect tick populations in unknown ways. Here, we used ecological niche modeling (ENM) to assess the potential geographic distributions of these two medically important vector species in North America under current condition and then transfer those models to the future under different future climate scenarios with special interest in highlighting new potential expansion areas. Current model predictions for A. maculatum showed suitable areas across the southern and Midwest United States, and east coast, western and southern Mexico. For D. andersoni, our models showed broad suitable areas across northwestern United States. New potential for range expansions was anticipated for both tick species northward in response to climate change, extending across the Midwest and New England for A. maculatum, and still farther north into Canada for D. andersoni.

Authors

Abdelghafar Alkishe,A Townsend Peterson

Journal

PeerJ

Published Date

2022/5/3

Chapter I: Recognizing sources of uncertainty in disease vector ecological niche models: an example with the tick Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato

Epidemiology is one of many fields that use ecological niche modeling to assess potential distributions or potential range expansions of species, in this case, of disease vectors and pathogens. When such models are transferred in space and time, it is important to understand sources and location of uncertainty in their predictions. Here, we used the tick species

Authors

Abdelghafar Alkishe,Marlon E Cobos,A Townsend Peterson,Abdallah M Samy

Journal

Geographic distributions of medically important ticks and tick-borne diseases in North America in changing climates

Published Date

2022/11/29

Low risk of acquiring melioidosis from the environment in the continental United States

Melioidosis is an underreported human disease of tropical and sub-tropical regions caused by the saprophyte Burkholderia pseudomallei. Although most global melioidosis cases are reported from tropical regions in Southeast Asia and northern Australia, there are multiple occurrences from sub-tropical regions, including the United States (U.S.). Most melioidosis cases reported from the continental U.S. are the result of acquiring the disease during travel to endemic regions or from contaminated imported materials. Only two human melioidosis cases from the continental U.S. have likely acquired B. pseudomallei directly from local environments and these cases lived only ~7 km from each other in rural Texas. In this study, we assessed the risk of acquiring melioidosis from the environment within the continental U.S. by surveying for B. pseudomallei in the environment in Texas where these two human melioidosis cases likely acquired their infections. We sampled the environment near the homes of the two cases and at additional sampling locations in surrounding counties in Texas that were selected based on ecological niche modeling. B. pseudomallei was not detected at the residences of these two cases or in the surrounding region. These negative data are important to demonstrate that B. pseudomallei is rare in the environment in the U.S. even at locations where locally acquired human cases likely have occurred, documenting the low risk of acquiring B. pseudomallei infection from the environment in the continental U.S.

Authors

Carina M Hall,Daniel Romero-Alvarez,Madison Martz,Ella Santana-Propper,Lora Versluis,Laura Jiménez,Abdelghafar Alkishe,Joseph D Busch,Trevor Maness,Jonathan Stewart,Tom Sidwa,Jay E Gee,Mindy G Elrod,Zachary Weiner,Alex R Hoffmaster,Jason W Sahl,Johanna S Salzer,A Townsend Peterson,Amanda Kieffer,David M Wagner

Journal

Plos one

Published Date

2022/7/29

Potential geographic distribution of Ixodes cookei, the vector of Powassan virus

Ixodes cookei Packard, the groundhog tick or woodchuck tick, is the main known vector of Powassan virus (POWV) disease in North America and an ectoparasite that infests diverse small- and mid-size mammals for blood meals to complete its life stages. Since I. cookei spends much of its life cycle off the host and needs hosts for a blood meal in order to pass to the next life stage, it is susceptible to changes in environmental conditions. We used a maximum-entropy approach to ecological niche modeling that incorporates detailed model-selection routes to link occurrence data to climatic variables to assess the potential geographic distribution of I. cookei under current and likely future climate conditions. Our models identified suitable areas in the eastern United States, from Tennessee and North Carolina north to southern Canada, including Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, eastern Newfoundland and Labrador …

Authors

Abdelghafar Alkishe,A Townsend Peterson

Journal

Journal of Vector Ecology

Published Date

2021/11

Likely geographic distributional shifts among medically important tick species and tick-associated diseases under climate change in North America: a review

Simple Summary North America is considered as an area likely to be significantly affected by global warming, with climate change causing markedly warmer winter temperatures in the United States in recent decades. Ticks are sensitive to changes in ambient abiotic conditions and, therefore, climate: they are poikilothermic, with the life stages of each species requiring specific sets of environmental conditions for successful development and survival. Our review focuses on (1) identifying and exploring suitable areas for the eight medically important vector tick species in North America; (2) exploring whether and how species’ distributions are likely to shift in coming decades in response to climate change, and in what ways; (3) and providing a picture on the status of the tick-associated diseases in North America from the present to the future. Abstract Ticks rank high among arthropod vectors in terms of numbers of infectious agents that they transmit to humans, including Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Colorado tick fever, human monocytic ehrlichiosis, tularemia, and human granulocytic anaplasmosis. Increasing temperature is suspected to affect tick biting rates and pathogen developmental rates, thereby potentially increasing risk for disease incidence. Tick distributions respond to climate change, but how their geographic ranges will shift in future decades and how those shifts may translate into changes in disease incidence remain unclear. In this study, we have assembled correlative ecological niche models for eight tick species of medical or veterinary importance in North America (Ixodes scapularis …

Authors

Abdelghafar Alkishe,Ram K Raghavan,Andrew T Peterson

Published Date

2021/3/5

Tick vectors, tick-borne diseases and climate change.

This expert opinion focuses on the impact of global warming and climate change on the distributional potential and population abundance of tick vectors and the occurrence and spread of tick-borne diseases.

Authors

Abdallah Samy,Abdelghafar Alkishe,Tatjana Pustahija,Townsend Peterson

Published Date

2021/12/3

Professor FAQs

What is Abdelghafar Alkishe's h-index at University of Kansas?

The h-index of Abdelghafar Alkishe has been 7 since 2020 and 8 in total.

What are Abdelghafar Alkishe's research interests?

The research interests of Abdelghafar Alkishe are: Disease Ecology, Infectious diseases, Vector-borne disease, Ecological Niche Modeling.

What is Abdelghafar Alkishe's total number of citations?

Abdelghafar Alkishe has 399 citations in total.

What are the co-authors of Abdelghafar Alkishe?

The co-authors of Abdelghafar Alkishe are Abdallah Samy, PhD (honors), Jorge Soberon, Ram Raghavan, Luis Osorio-Olvera, Marlon E. Cobos, Claudia Nuñez-Penichet.

Co-Authors

H-index: 77
Abdallah Samy, PhD (honors)

Abdallah Samy, PhD (honors)

University of Kansas

H-index: 62
Jorge Soberon

Jorge Soberon

University of Kansas

H-index: 21
Ram Raghavan

Ram Raghavan

University of Missouri

H-index: 17
Luis Osorio-Olvera

Luis Osorio-Olvera

Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México

H-index: 14
Marlon E. Cobos

Marlon E. Cobos

University of Kansas

H-index: 8
Claudia Nuñez-Penichet

Claudia Nuñez-Penichet

University of Kansas

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