Abdelaziz Alsharawy

Abdelaziz Alsharawy

Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

H-index: 4

North America-United States

About Abdelaziz Alsharawy

Abdelaziz Alsharawy, With an exceptional h-index of 4 and a recent h-index of 4 (since 2020), a distinguished researcher at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, specializes in the field of Behavioral Economics, Health Economics, Neuroeconomics.

Abdelaziz Alsharawy Information

University

Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

Position

___

Citations(all)

199

Citations(since 2020)

192

Cited By

16

hIndex(all)

4

hIndex(since 2020)

4

i10Index(all)

3

i10Index(since 2020)

3

Email

University Profile Page

Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

Abdelaziz Alsharawy Skills & Research Interests

Behavioral Economics

Health Economics

Neuroeconomics

Top articles of Abdelaziz Alsharawy

Public health messages encouraging emotion reappraisal reduces vaccine hesitancy and betrayal aversion

While public health organizations have historically used messaging as a strategy for controlling disease, vaccine immunization rates still far short of target levels. In this pre-registered vignette experiment, we explore the impact of an emotion reappraisal messaging strategy on both vaccine hesitancy and betrayal aversion. While vaccine hesitancy is a well-known cause of vaccine avoidance, betrayal aversion, a preference for avoiding exposing oneself to the risk of being betrayed in situations involving trust, is an additional factor linked to vaccine avoidance in recent research. We conducted our experiment on 1189 United States residents through Amazon Mechanical Turk in September 2021. We find that both ambiguous and positive emotion reappraisal messaging targeted at the betrayal aversion channel of vaccine avoidance leads to a significant decrease in vaccine-related betrayal aversion. Our results suggest that emotion reappraisal messaging would be an effective communications policy tool to increase vaccine uptake.

Authors

Esha Dwibedi,Abdelaziz Alsharawy,Jason Aimone,Sheryl Ball

Published Date

2024

The effects of task difficulty and presentation format on eye movements in risky choice

This study investigates the process of risky choice using eye tracking. We manipulate the complexity and presentation of lottery choices while measuring eye movements. In particular, we measure the frequencies of information collection procedures associated with established theories of risky choice, namely, expected utility theory and component comparison theory. These choice process patterns are sensitive to the difficulty of calculations and the presentation format of lotteries. Participants appear to transition between decision-making procedures depending on how lottery choices are presented and their complexity. They also attend to payoffs as the primary feature considered during component comparisons. Our findings emphasize the influence of information presentation on decision-making processes and decisions.

Authors

Xiaomeng Zhang,Jason A Aimone,Abdelaziz Alsharawy,Flora Li,Sheryl Ball,Alec Smith

Journal

Frontiers in Behavioral Economics

Published Date

2024/3/15

People are less myopic about future than past collective outcomes

Myopia involves giving disproportionate weight to outcomes that occur close to the present. Myopia in people’s evaluations of political outcomes and proposals threatens effective policymaking. It can lead to inefficient spending just before elections, cause inaction on important future policy challenges, and create incentives for government interventions aimed at boosting short-term performance at the expense of long-term welfare. But, are people generally myopic? Existing evidence comes mostly from studies that disregard either the future or collective outcomes. Political science characterizes people as myopic based on how they retrospectively evaluate collective outcomes, such as the state of the economy. Behavioral economics and psychology find that people make myopic choices involving future individual outcomes, such as money or personal health. To characterize myopia more generally, we offer two …

Authors

Markus Prior,Abdelaziz Alsharawy,Talbot M Andrews

Journal

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Published Date

2023/12/26

Vaccine hesitancy and betrayal aversion

The determinants of vaccine hesitancy remain complex and context specific. Betrayal aversion occurs when an individual is hesitant to risk being betrayed in an environment involving trust. In this pre-registered vignette experiment, we show that betrayal aversion is not captured by current vaccine hesitancy measures despite representing a significant source of unwillingness to be vaccinated. Our survey instrument was administered to 888 United States residents via Amazon Mechanical Turk in March 2021. We find that over a third of participants have betrayal averse preferences, resulting in an 8–26% decline in vaccine acceptance, depending on the betrayal source. Interestingly, attributing betrayal risk to scientists or government results in the greatest declines in vaccine acceptance. We explore an exogenous message intervention and show that an otherwise effective message acts narrowly and fails to reduce …

Authors

Abdelaziz Alsharawy,Esha Dwibedi,Jason Aimone,Sheryl Ball

Journal

Annals of Biomedical Engineering

Published Date

2022/7

Fear of COVID-19 changes economic preferences: evidence from a repeated cross-sectional Mturk survey

The personal experience of events such as financial crises and natural disasters can alter economic preferences. We administered a repeated cross-sectional preference survey during the early stages of the COVID-19 outbreak, collecting three bi-weekly samples from participants recruited through Amazon Mechanical Turk. The survey elicits economic preferences, self-reported fear of the pandemic, and beliefs about economic and health consequences. Preferences varied over time and across regions, and self-reported fear of the pandemic explains this variation. These findings suggest caution about the generalizability of some types of experimental work during times of heightened fear.

Authors

Abdelaziz Alsharawy,Sheryl Ball,Alec Smith,Ross Spoon

Journal

Journal of the Economic Science Association

Published Date

2021/12

Incentives affect the process of risky choice

We investigated the effect of large changes in financial incentives on the process of decision-making by measuring autonomic arousal and visual attention during an incentivized lottery-choice task. High real stakes were accompanied by increased risk aversion and physiological arousal, and by shifts in attention toward safer alternatives. These effects were manifested both within and between individuals. We find no evidence that heightened risk aversion is a mistake. To capture the interactions of arousal and attention with subjective value during evidence accumulation, we developed and fit a new arousal-modulated Attentional Drift Diffusion model (aADDM). Our computational model demonstrates that arousal amplifies discounting of high-valued outcomes (multiplicative gaze bias) when participants attended to low-valued outcomes. Arousal and attention, and their interaction, are integral to the process of decision-making under risk.

Authors

Abdelaziz Alsharawy,Xiaomeng Zhang,Sheryl B Ball,Alec Smith

Journal

Available at SSRN 3943681

Published Date

2021/10/15

Gender differences in fear and risk perception during the COVID-19 pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic has led many people to suffer from emotional distress. Previous studies suggest that women process and express affective experiences, such as fear, with a greater intensity compared to men. We administered an online survey to a sample of participants in the United States that measures fear of COVID-19, perceptions about health and financial risks, and preventative measures taken. Despite the empirical fact that men are more likely to experience adverse health consequences from COVID-19, women report greater fear and more negative expectations about health-related consequences of COVID-19 than men. However, women are more optimistic than men regarding the financial consequences of the pandemic. Women also report more negative emotional experiences generally during the pandemic, particularly in situations where other people or the government take actions that make matters worse. Though women report taking more preventative measures than men in response to the pandemic, gender differences in behavior are reduced after controlling for fear. These results shed light on how differences in emotional experiences of the pandemic may inform policy interventions.

Authors

Abdelaziz Alsharawy,Ross Spoon,Alec Smith,Sheryl Ball

Journal

Frontiers in psychology

Published Date

2021/8/5

Abdelaziz Alsharawy FAQs

What is Abdelaziz Alsharawy's h-index at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University?

The h-index of Abdelaziz Alsharawy has been 4 since 2020 and 4 in total.

What are Abdelaziz Alsharawy's top articles?

The articles with the titles of

Public health messages encouraging emotion reappraisal reduces vaccine hesitancy and betrayal aversion

The effects of task difficulty and presentation format on eye movements in risky choice

People are less myopic about future than past collective outcomes

Vaccine hesitancy and betrayal aversion

Fear of COVID-19 changes economic preferences: evidence from a repeated cross-sectional Mturk survey

Incentives affect the process of risky choice

Gender differences in fear and risk perception during the COVID-19 pandemic

are the top articles of Abdelaziz Alsharawy at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.

What are Abdelaziz Alsharawy's research interests?

The research interests of Abdelaziz Alsharawy are: Behavioral Economics, Health Economics, Neuroeconomics

What is Abdelaziz Alsharawy's total number of citations?

Abdelaziz Alsharawy has 199 citations in total.

What are the co-authors of Abdelaziz Alsharawy?

The co-authors of Abdelaziz Alsharawy are Ragui Assaad, Sheryl Ball, Alec Smith, Esha Dwibedi.

    Co-Authors

    H-index: 49
    Ragui Assaad

    Ragui Assaad

    University of Minnesota-Twin Cities

    H-index: 19
    Sheryl Ball

    Sheryl Ball

    Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

    H-index: 12
    Alec Smith

    Alec Smith

    Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

    H-index: 2
    Esha Dwibedi

    Esha Dwibedi

    Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

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