Abdel Abdellaoui

Abdel Abdellaoui

Universiteit van Amsterdam

H-index: 60

Europe-Netherlands

About Abdel Abdellaoui

Abdel Abdellaoui, With an exceptional h-index of 60 and a recent h-index of 54 (since 2020), a distinguished researcher at Universiteit van Amsterdam, specializes in the field of Human Genetics, Behavioral Genetics, Population Genetics, Neuroscience.

His recent articles reflect a diverse array of research interests and contributions to the field:

Associations between common genetic variants and income provide insights about the socioeconomic health gradient

Genome-wide association study identifies 30 obsessive-compulsive disorder associated loci

Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis: Research Using the Autism Polygenic Score

Mental illness and cardiovascular health: observational and polygenic score analyses in a population-based cohort study

Gene expression has distinct associations with brain structure and function in major depressive disorder

Burt uses a fallacious motte-and-bailey argument to dispute the value of genetics for social science.

Genome-Wide Association Studies of Coffee Intake in UK/US Participants of European Ancestry Uncover Gene-Cohort Influences

Brain structure and function show distinct relations with genetic predispositions to mental health and cognition

Abdel Abdellaoui Information

University

Universiteit van Amsterdam

Position

AMC Medical Research BV

Citations(all)

18281

Citations(since 2020)

13935

Cited By

10079

hIndex(all)

60

hIndex(since 2020)

54

i10Index(all)

115

i10Index(since 2020)

109

Email

University Profile Page

Universiteit van Amsterdam

Abdel Abdellaoui Skills & Research Interests

Human Genetics

Behavioral Genetics

Population Genetics

Neuroscience

Top articles of Abdel Abdellaoui

Associations between common genetic variants and income provide insights about the socioeconomic health gradient

Authors

Philipp D Koellinger,Hyeokmoon Kweon,Casper Burik,Yuchen Ning,Rafael Ahlskog,Charley Xia,Erik Abner,Yanchun Bao,Laxmi Bhatta,Tariq Faquih,Maud de Feijter,Paul Fisher,Andrea Gelemanović,Alexandros Giannelis,Jouke-Jan Hottenga,Bita Khalili,Yunsung Lee,Ruifang Li-Gao,Jaan Masso,Ronny Myhre,Teemu Palviainen,Cornelius Rietveld,Alexander Teumer,Resnke Verweij,Emily Willoughby,Esben Agerbo,Sven Bergmann,D Boomsma,Anders Borglum,Ben Brumpton,Neil Davies,Tõnu Esko,Scott Gordon,Georg Homuth,M Arfan Ikram,Magnus Johannesson,Jaakko Kaprio,Michael Kidd,Zoltán Kutalik,Alex Kwong,James Lee,Annemarie Luik,Per Magnus,Pedro Marques-Vidal,Nicholas Martin,Dennis Mook-Kanamori,Preben Mortensen,Sven Oskarsson,Emil Pedersen,Ozren Polašek,Frits Rosendaal,Melissa Smart,Harold Snieder,Peter van der Most,Peter Vollenweider,Henry Völzke,Gonneke Willemsen,Jonathan Beauchamp,Thomas DiPrete,Richard Karlsson Linnér,Qiongshi Lu,Tim Morris,Aysu Okbay,K Harden,Abdel Abdellaoui,William Hill,Ronald de Vlaming,Daniel Benjamin

Published Date

2024/1/12

We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) on income among individuals of European descent and leveraged the results to investigate the socio-economic health gradient (N= 668,288). We found 162 genomic loci associated with a common genetic factor underlying various income measures, all with small effect sizes. Our GWAS-derived polygenic index captures 1-4% of income variance, with only one-fourth attributed to direct genetic effects. A phenome-wide association study using this polygenic index showed reduced risks for a broad spectrum of diseases, including hypertension, obesity, type 2 diabetes, coronary atherosclerosis, depression, asthma, and back pain. The income factor showed a substantial genetic correlation (0.92, se=. 006) with educational attainment (EA). Accounting for EA's genetic overlap with income revealed that the remaining genetic signal for higher income related to better mental health but reduced physical health benefits and increased participation in risky behaviours such as drinking and smoking.

Genome-wide association study identifies 30 obsessive-compulsive disorder associated loci

Authors

Nora I Strom,Zachary F Gerring,Marco Galimberti,Dongmei Yu,Matthew W Halvorsen,Abdel Abdellaoui,Cristina Rodriguez-Fontenla,Julia M Sealock,Tim Bigdeli,Jonathan RI Coleman,Behrang Mahjani,Jackson G Thorp,Katharina Bey,Christie L Burton,Jurjen J Luykx,Gwyneth Zai,Silvia Alemany,Christine Andre,Kathleen D Askland,Nerisa Banaj,Cristina Barlassina,Judith Becker Nissen,O Joseph Bienvenu,Donald Black,Michael H Bloch,Julia Boberg,Sigrid Borte,Rosa Bosch,Michael Breen,Brian P Brennan,Helena Brentani,Joseph D Buxbaum,Jonas Bybjerg-Grauholm,Enda M Byrne,Judit Cabana-Dominguez,Beatriz Camarena,Adrian Camarena,Carolina Cappi,Angel Carracedo,Miguel Casas,Maria Cristina Cavallini,Valentina Ciullo,Edwin H Cook,Jesse Crosby,Bernadette AM Cullen,Elles J De Schipper,Richard Delorme,Srdjan Djurovic,Jason A Elias,Xavier Estivill,Martha J Falkenstein,Bengt T Fundin,Lauryn Garner,Chris German,Christina Gironda,Fernando S Goes,Marco A Grados,Jakob Grove,Wei Guo,Jan Haavik,Kristen Hagen,Kelly Harrington,Alexandra Havdahl,Kira D Hoeffler,Ana G Hounie,Donald Hucks,Christina Hultman,Magdalena Janecka,Eric Jenike,Elinor K Karlsson,Kara Kelley,Julia Klawohn,Janice E Krasnow,Kristi Krebs,Christoph Lange,Nuria Lanzagorta,Daniel Levey,Kerstin Lindblad-Toh,Fabio Macciardi,Brion Maher,Brittany Mathes,Evonne McArthur,Nathaniel McGregor,Nicole C McLaughlin,Sandra Meier,Euripedes C Miguel,Maureen Mulhern,Paul S Nestadt,Erika L Nurmi,Kevin S O'Connell,Lisa Osiecki,Olga Therese Ousdal,Teemu Palviainen,Nancy L Pedersen,Fabrizio Piras,Federica Piras,Sriramya Potluri,Raquel Rabionet,Alfredo Ramirez,Scott Rauch,Abraham Reichenberg,Mark A Riddle,Stephan Ripke,Maria C Rosario,Aline S Sampaio,Miriam A Schiele,Anne Heidi Skogholt,Laura G Sloofman G Sloofman,Jan Smit,Maria Soler Artigas,Laurent F Thomas,Eric Tifft,Homero Vallada,Nathanial van Kirk,Jeremy Veenstra-VanderWeele,Nienke NCC Vulink,Christopher P Walker,Ying Wang,Jens R Wendland,Bendik S Winsvold,Yin Yao,Hang Zhou,23andMe Research Team,VA Million Veteran Program,Estonian Biobank,CoGa research team,iPSYCH,HUNT research team,NORDiC,Arpana Agrawal,Pino Alonso,Goetz Berberich,Kathleen K Bucholz,Cynthia M Bulik,Danielle Cath,Damiaan Denys,Valsamma Eapen,Howard Edenberg,Peter Falkai,Thomas V Fernandez,Abby J Fyer,JM Gaziano,Dan A Geller,Hans J Grabe,Benjamin D Greenberg,Gregory L Hanna,Ian B Hickie,David M Hougaard,Norbert Kathmann,James Kennedy

Journal

medRxiv

Published Date

2024

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) affects ~1% of the population and exhibits a high SNP-heritability, yet previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have provided limited information on the genetic etiology and underlying biological mechanisms of the disorder. We conducted a GWAS meta-analysis combining 53,660 OCD cases and 2,044,417 controls from 28 European-ancestry cohorts revealing 30 independent genome-wide significant SNPs and a SNP-based heritability of 6.7%. Separate GWAS for clinical, biobank, comorbid, and self-report sub-groups found no evidence of sample ascertainment impacting our results. Functional and positional QTL gene-based approaches identified 249 significant candidate risk genes for OCD, of which 25 were identified as putatively causal, highlighting WDR6, DALRD3, CTNND1 and genes in the MHC region. Tissue and single-cell enrichment analyses highlighted hippocampal and cortical excitatory neurons, along with D1- and D2-type dopamine receptor-containing medium spiny neurons, as playing a role in OCD risk. OCD displayed significant genetic correlations with 65 out of 112 examined phenotypes. Notably, it showed positive genetic correlations with all included psychiatric phenotypes, in particular anxiety, depression, anorexia nervosa, and Tourette syndrome, and negative correlations with a subset of the included autoimmune disorders, educational attainment, and body mass index.. This study marks a significant step toward unraveling its genetic landscape and advances understanding of OCD genetics, providing a foundation for future interventions to address this debilitating …

Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis: Research Using the Autism Polygenic Score

Authors

Melanie M de Wit,Morgan J Morgan,Ilan Libedinsky,Chloe Austerberry,Sander Begeer,Abdel Abdellaoui,Angelica Ronald,Tinca JC Polderman

Published Date

2024

Objective Genetic factors play a substantial role in the etiology of autism and its co-occurrence with other conditions and traits. The autism polygenic score, derived from the latest autism case-control meta-genome-wide association studies, captures some of the accumulated influence of common genetic variants on autism. We reviewed and meta-analyzed published studies that assessed the relationship between this autism polygenic score and autism diagnosis, and autistic, behavioral and neurobiological traits. Method Systematically searching public databases, we identified 72 studies and > 750 outcome measures. Included studies received a quality assessment. Results The majority of included studies were rated as good quality. The autism polygenic score was most strongly associated with autism diagnosis (meta-analytic r = .162, 95% CI .066 - .258). The autism polygenic score was also significantly associated with autistic traits but to a lesser degree than for autism (meta-analytic r = .042 (95% CI .004 - .081). Associations with other outcomes were inconsistent and meta-analytic effect sizes were generally small (median r = .03). Conclusion We conclude that the current autism polygenic score is consistently associated with autism diagnostic status and autistic traits, but overlap between autism and other traits and conditions is not, from publications to date, explained significantly by the autism polygenic score. When compared to other mental conditions, autism is phenotypically and etiologically heterogeneous, which might drive the relatively modest associations observed with the autism polygenic score to date.

Mental illness and cardiovascular health: observational and polygenic score analyses in a population-based cohort study

Authors

RR Veeneman,JM Vermeulen,Mara Bialas,AK Bhamidipati,A Abdellaoui,Marcus R Munafò,DAJP Denys,CR Bezzina,KJH Verweij,Rafik Tadros,JL Treur

Journal

Psychological Medicine

Published Date

2024/4

BackgroundIndividuals with serious mental illness have a markedly shorter life expectancy. A major contributor to premature death is cardiovascular disease (CVD). We investigated associations of (genetic liability for) depressive disorder, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia with a range of CVD traits and examined to what degree these were driven by important confounders.MethodsWe included participants of the Dutch Lifelines cohort (N = 147 337) with information on self-reported lifetime diagnosis of depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, or schizophrenia and CVD traits. Employing linear mixed-effects models, we examined associations between mental illness diagnoses and CVD, correcting for psychotropic medication, demographic and lifestyle factors. In a subsample (N = 73 965), we repeated these analyses using polygenic scores (PGSs) for the three mental illnesses.ResultsThere was strong evidence that …

Gene expression has distinct associations with brain structure and function in major depressive disorder

Authors

Shu Liu,Abdel Abdellaoui,Karin JH Verweij,Guido A van Wingen

Journal

Advanced Science

Published Date

2023/3

Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with structural and functional brain abnormalities. MDD as well as brain anatomy and function are influenced by genetic factors, but the role of gene expression remains unclear. Here, this work investigates how cortical gene expression contributes to structural and functional brain abnormalities in MDD. This work compares the gray matter volume and resting‐state functional measures in a Chinese sample of 848 MDD patients and 749 healthy controls, and these case‐control differences are then associated with cortical variation of gene expression. While whole gene expression is positively associated with structural abnormalities, it is negatively associated with functional abnormalities. This work observes the relationships of expression levels with brain abnormalities for individual genes, and found that transcriptional correlates of brain structure and function show …

Burt uses a fallacious motte-and-bailey argument to dispute the value of genetics for social science.

Authors

Brendan P Zietsch,Abdel Abdellaoui,Karin JH Verweij

Journal

Behavioral & Brain Sciences

Published Date

2023/1/1

Burt's argument relies on a motte-and-bailey fallacy. Burt aims to argue against the value of genetics for social science; instead she argues against certain interpretations of a specific kind of genetics tool, polygenic scores (PGSs). The limitations, previously identified by behavioural geneticists including ourselves, do not negate the value of PGSs, let alone genetics in general, for social science.

Genome-Wide Association Studies of Coffee Intake in UK/US Participants of European Ancestry Uncover Gene-Cohort Influences

Authors

Hayley HA Thorpe,Pierre Fontanillas,Benjamin K Pham,John J Meredith,Mariela V Jennings,Natasia S Courchesne-Krak,Laura Vilar-Ribo,Sevim B Bianchi,Julian Mutz,Sarah L Elson,Jibran Y Khokhar,Abdel Abdellaoui,Lea K Davis,Abraham A Palmer,Sandra Sanchez-Roige,23andMe Research Team

Journal

medRxiv

Published Date

2023/9/11

Coffee is one of the most widely consumed beverages. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of coffee intake in US-based 23andMe participants (N= 130,153) and identified 7 significant loci, with many replicating in three multi-ancestral cohorts. We examined genetic correlations and performed a phenome-wide association study across thousands of biomarkers and health and lifestyle traits, then compared our results to the largest available GWAS of coffee intake from UK Biobank (UKB; N= 334,659). The results of these two GWAS were highly discrepant. We observed positive genetic correlations between coffee intake and psychiatric illnesses, pain, and gastrointestinal traits in 23andMe that were absent or negative in UKB. Genetic correlations with cognition were negative in 23andMe but positive in UKB. The only consistent observations were positive genetic correlations with substance use …

Brain structure and function show distinct relations with genetic predispositions to mental health and cognition

Authors

Shu Liu,Dirk JA Smit,Abdel Abdellaoui,Guido A van Wingen,Karin JH Verweij

Journal

Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging

Published Date

2023/3/1

Background Mental health and cognitive achievement are partly heritable, highly polygenic, and associated with brain variations in structure and function. However, the underlying neural mechanisms remain unclear. Methods We investigated the association between genetic predispositions to various mental health and cognitive traits and a large set of structural and functional brain measures from the UK Biobank (N= 36,799). We also applied linkage disequilibrium score regression to estimate the genetic correlations between various traits and brain measures based on genome-wide data. To decompose the complex association patterns, we performed a multivariate partial least squares model of the genetic and imaging modalities. Results The univariate analyses showed that certain traits were related to brain structure (significant genetic correlations with total cortical surface area from r g=− 0.101 for smoking …

Partner-choice genetics in Japan

Authors

Karin JH Verweij,Abdel Abdellaoui

Journal

Nature Human Behaviour

Published Date

2023/1

Non-random mating affects the genetic makeup of populations and challenges the validity of popular genetics methods. A new study explores the unique patterns of non-random mating in the Japanese population and underscores the importance of large-scale genetic studies outside European-descended groups.

Replicable brain–phenotype associations require large-scale neuroimaging data

Authors

Shu Liu,Abdel Abdellaoui,Karin JH Verweij,Guido A van Wingen

Journal

Nature Human Behaviour

Published Date

2023/8

Numerous neuroimaging studies have investigated the neural basis of interindividual differences but the replicability of brain–phenotype associations remains largely unknown. We used the UK Biobank neuroimaging dataset (N = 37,447) to examine associations with six variables related to physical and mental health: age, body mass index, intelligence, memory, neuroticism and alcohol consumption, and assessed the improvement of replicability for brain–phenotype associations with increasing sampling sizes. Age may require only 300 individuals to provide highly replicable associations but other phenotypes required 1,500 to 3,900 individuals. The required sample size showed a negative power law relation with the estimated effect size. When only comparing the upper and lower quarters, the minimally required sample sizes for imaging decreased by 15–75%. Our findings demonstrate that large-scale …

15 years of GWAS discovery: realizing the promise

Authors

Abdel Abdellaoui,Loic Yengo,Karin JH Verweij,Peter M Visscher

Published Date

2023/2/2

It has been 15 years since the advent of the genome-wide association study (GWAS) era. Here, we review how this experimental design has realized its promise by facilitating an impressive range of discoveries with remarkable impact on multiple fields, including population genetics, complex trait genetics, epidemiology, social science, and medicine. We predict that the emergence of large-scale biobanks will continue to expand to more diverse populations and capture more of the allele frequency spectrum through whole-genome sequencing, which will further improve our ability to investigate the causes and consequences of human genetic variation for complex traits and diseases.

Trading social status for genetics in marriage markets: evidence from Great Britain and Norway

Authors

Abdel Abdellaoui,Oana Borcan,Pierre-André Chiappori,David Hugh-Jones,Fartein Ask Torvik,Eivind Ystrøm

Published Date

2023/7/12

Under social-genetic assortative mating (SGAM), socio-economic status (SES) and genetically inherited traits are both assets in marriage markets, become associated in spouse pairs, and are passed together to future generations. This gives a new explanation for persistent intergenerational inequality and observed genetic differences between rich and poor. We model SGAM and test for it in two large surveys from Great Britain and Norway. Spouses of earlierborn siblings have genetics predicting more education. This effect is mediated by individuals’ own education and income. Thus, shocks to SES are reflected in the DNA of subsequent generations. Under SGAM, the distribution of genetic variants in society is endogenous to economic institutions.

Interplay between genetic risk and the parent environment in adolescence and substance use in young adulthood: A TRAILS study

Authors

Joëlle A Pasman,Koen Smit,Wilma AM Vollebergh,Ilja M Nolte,Catharina A Hartman,Abdel Abdellaoui,Karin JH Verweij,Dominique Maciejewski,Jacqueline M Vink

Journal

Development and psychopathology

Published Date

2023/2

Many adolescents start using tobacco, alcohol, and cannabis. Genetic vulnerability, parent characteristics in young adolescence, and interaction (GxE) and correlation (rGE) between these factors could contribute to the development of substance use. Using prospective data from the TRacking Adolescent Individuals’ Lives Survey (TRAILS; N = 1,645), we model latent parent characteristics in young adolescence to predict young adult substance use. Polygenic scores (PGS) are created based on genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for smoking, alcohol use, and cannabis use. Using structural equation modeling we model the direct, GxE, and rGE effects of parent factors and PGS on young adult smoking, alcohol use, and cannabis initiation. The PGS, parental involvement, parental substance use, and parent–child relationship quality predicted smoking. There was GxE such that the PGS amplified the effect of …

Polygenic risk prediction: why and when out-of-sample prediction R2 can exceed SNP-based heritability

Authors

Xiaotong Wang,Alicia Walker,Joana A Revez,Guiyan Ni,Mark J Adams,Andrew M McIntosh,Naomi R Wray,Stephan Ripke,Manuel Mattheisen,Maciej Trzaskowski,Enda M Byrne,Abdel Abdellaoui,Esben Agerbo,Tracy M Air,Till FM Andlauer,Silviu-Alin Bacanu,Marie Bækvad-Hansen,Aartjan TF Beekman,Tim B Bigdeli,Elisabeth B Binder,Julien Bryois,Henriette N Buttenschøn,Jonas Bybjerg-Grauholm,Na Cai,Enrique Castelao,Jane Hvarregaard Christensen,Toni-Kim Clarke,Jonathan RI Coleman,Lucía Colodro-Conde,Baptiste Couvy-Duchesne,Nick Craddock,Gregory E Crawford,Gail Davies,Franziska Degenhardt,Eske M Derks,Nese Direk,Conor V Dolan,Erin C Dunn,Thalia C Eley,Valentina Escott-Price,Farnush Farhadi Hassan Kiadeh,Hilary K Finucane,Jerome C Foo,Andreas J Forstner,Josef Frank,Héléna A Gaspar,Michael Gill,Fernando S Goes,Scott D Gordon,Jakob Grove,Lynsey S Hall,Christine Søholm Hansen,Thomas F Hansen,Stefan Herms,Ian B Hickie,Per Hoffmann,Georg Homuth,Carsten Horn,Jouke-Jan Hottenga,David M Hougaard,David M Howard,Marcus Ising,Rick Jansen,Ian Jones,Lisa A Jones,Eric Jorgenson,James A Knowles,Isaac S Kohane,Julia Kraft,Warren W Kretzschmar,Zoltán Kutalik,Yihan Li,Penelope A Lind,Donald J MacIntyre,Dean F MacKinnon,Robert M Maier,Wolfgang Maier,Jonathan Marchini,Hamdi Mbarek,Patrick McGrath,Peter McGuffin,Sarah E Medland,Divya Mehta,Christel M Middeldorp,Evelin Mihailov,Yuri Milaneschi,Lili Milani,Francis M Mondimore,Grant W Montgomery,Sara Mostafavi,Niamh Mullins,Matthias Nauck,Bernard Ng,Michel G Nivard,Dale R Nyholt,Paul F O'Reilly,Hogni Oskarsson,Michael J Owen,Jodie N Painter,Carsten Bøcker Pedersen,Marianne Giørtz Pedersen,Roseann E Peterson,Wouter J Peyrot,Giorgio Pistis,Danielle Posthuma,Jorge A Quiroz,Per Qvist,John P Rice,Brien P Riley,Margarita Rivera,Saira Saeed Mirza,Robert Schoevers,Eva C Schulte,Ling Shen,Jianxin Shi,Stanley I Shyn,Engilbert Sigurdsson,Grant CB Sinnamon,Johannes H Smit,Daniel J Smith,Hreinn Stefansson,Stacy Steinberg,Fabian Streit,Jana Strohmaier,Katherine E Tansey,Henning Teismann,Alexander Teumer,Wesley Thompson,Pippa A Thomson,Thorgeir E Thorgeirsson,Matthew Traylor,Jens Treutlein,Vassily Trubetskoy,André G Uitterlinden,Daniel Umbricht,Sandra Van der Auwera,Albert M van Hemert,Alexander Viktorin,Peter M Visscher,Yunpeng Wang,Bradley T Webb,Shantel Marie Weinsheimer,Jürgen Wellmann,Gonneke Willemsen,Stephanie H Witt,Yang Wu,Hualin S Xi,Jian Yang,Futao Zhang,Volker Arolt

Journal

The American Journal of Human Genetics

Published Date

2023/7/6

In polygenic score (PGS) analysis, the coefficient of determination (R2) is a key statistic to evaluate efficacy. R2 is the proportion of phenotypic variance explained by the PGS, calculated in a cohort that is independent of the genome-wide association study (GWAS) that provided estimates of allelic effect sizes. The SNP-based heritability (, the proportion of total phenotypic variances attributable to all common SNPs) is the theoretical upper limit of the out-of-sample prediction R2. However, in real data analyses R2 has been reported to exceed , which occurs in parallel with the observation that estimates tend to decline as the number of cohorts being meta-analyzed increases. Here, we quantify why and when these observations are expected. Using theory and simulation, we show that if heterogeneities in cohort-specific exist, or if genetic correlations between cohorts are less than one,  …

Defining the genetic architecture of tobacco smoking and its overlap with SES and general addiction

Authors

Adrià Túnez,Jorien Treur,Abdel Abdellaoui,Karin Verweij

Published Date

2023/12/13

Out of the preventable risk factors for major health disorders, smoking is the most widespread and impactful, showing high comorbidity with several disorders1, 2. As much as we know the potential health detriment of smoking, studying the phenomenon is not easy. Despite the undeniable advance of genomics, with measured DNA we have only been able to explain about 25% of individual differences in smoking3, yet we know from twin studies that 40 to 80% of its variance can be explained by genetics4, 5. As the size of the samples used in genetic studies increases, these numbers slowly increase as well. However, it also introduces correlates and confounders that impoverish the genetic signal. Therefore, sheer size is not enough to conceptualize smoking better. Big databases like the UK Biobank include several variables that are related to smoking such as cigarettes smoked per day, lifetime smoking and age of initiation. In the literature, different definitions or combinations of smoking related variables have been used to represent the essence of nicotine consumption6. Studying the effects of the number of cigarettes smoked per day on lung cancer is not the same as looking at the effects of age of onset. To our best knowledge, even the most complex definitions of smoking used so far are not accurate enough. Current GWAS approaches are crude and do not correct for confounders, therefore containing potential bias, in this case genetically associated with smoking; like alcohol consumption, cannabis use or socio-economic factors7–9. For instance, there might exist a strong genetic correlation between early age of smoking initiation and …

A genome-wide association study of a rage-related misophonia symptom and the genetic link with audiological traits, psychiatric disorders, and personality

Authors

Dirk JA Smit,Melissa Bakker,Abdel Abdellaoui,Alexander E Hoetink,Nienke Vulink,Damiaan Denys

Journal

Frontiers in neuroscience

Published Date

2023/1/24

IntroductionPeople with misophonia experience strong negative emotional responses to sounds and associated stimuli—mostly human produced—to an extent that it may cause impairment in social functioning. The exact nature of the disorder remains a matter of ongoing research and debate. Here, we investigated the genetic etiology of misophonia to understand contributing genetic factors and shed light on individual differences in characteristics that are related to the disorder.MethodsFor misophonia, we used an unpublished genome-wide association study (GWAS) from genetic service provider 23andMe, Inc., on a self-report item probing a single common misophonic symptom: the occurrence of rage when others produce eating sounds. First, we used gene-based and functional annotation analyses to explore neurobiological determinants of the rage-related misophonia symptom. Next, we calculated genetic correlations (rG) of this rage-related misophonia symptom GWAS with a wide range of traits and disorders from audiology (tinnitus, hearing performance, and hearing trauma), psychiatry, neurology, and personality traits.ResultsThe rage-related misophonia symptom was significantly correlated with tinnitus, major depression disorder (MDD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD; 0.12 < rG < 0.22). Stronger genetic correlations (0.21 < rG < 0.42) were observed for two clusters of personality traits: a guilt/neuroticism and an irritability/sensitivity cluster. Our results showed no genetic correlation with attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and psychotic disorders. A …

Majestic tigers: personality structure in the great Amur cat

Authors

Rosalind Arden,Abdel Abdellaoui,Qian Li,Yao Zheng,Dengfeng Wang,Yanjie Su

Journal

Royal Society open science

Published Date

2023/4/5

We explore individual differences in tiger personality. We first asked—is there evidence of personality dimensions (analogous to the Big Five in human personality research) in the Amur tiger? We then asked, are any discoverable personality dimensions associated with measured outcomes, including group status, health and mating frequency? 152 of our participating tigers live in the world's largest semi-wild tiger sanctuary in North Eastern China. Our second sample of 96 tigers also lives in a sanctuary. Having two samples allowed us to assess the replicability of the personality dimensions or factors reported in our first sample. We found that two factors (explaining 21% and 17% of the variance among items) which we call, for descriptive ease, Majesty and Steadiness, provide the best fit to the data. Tigers that score higher on Majesty are healthier, eat more live prey, have higher group status (among other tigers as …

10. FROM GENES TO BEANS: GENETIC CORRELATIONS WITH HABITUAL COFFEE INTAKE REVEAL GENE-CULTURE INTERACTIONS ACROSS UK-AND US-BASED COHORTS

Authors

Hayley Thorpe,Pierre Fontanillas,Benjamin K Pham,John J Meredith,Mariela V Jennings,Natasia S Courchesne-Krak,Laura Vilar-Ribó,Sevim B Bianchi,Julian Mutz,Sarah L Elson,Jibran Y Khokhar,Abdel Abdellaoui,Lea K Davis,Abraham A Palmer,Sandra Sanchez-Roige,Me Research Team

Journal

European Neuropsychopharmacology

Published Date

2023/10/1

BackgroundCaffeinated coffee is one of the most consumed beverages; its habitual consumption is heritable but is also influenced by environmental factors such as cultural norms surrounding the consumption of caffeinated beverages. While some epidemiological studies suggest that habitual coffee intake may have health benefits, others indicate that it increases the risk of certain cancers, metabolic disorders, and substance use. Previous genetic studies have investigated the biological basis of habitual coffee intake and its relationship with select health outcomes, but no studies have examined if these associations are subject to cultural or cohort influences.MethodsWe conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of coffee intake in 23 and Me research participants of European ancestry (N=130,135). Secondary analyses were performed using Multimarker Analysis of Genomic Annotation (MAGMA), Hi-C …

The CADM2 Gene and Behavior: A Phenome-Wide Scan in UK-Biobank

Authors

Joëlle A Pasman,Zeli Chen,Dirk JA Smit,Jacqueline M Vink,Michel C Van Den Oever,Tommy Pattij,Taco J De Vries,Abdel Abdellaoui,Karin JH Verweij

Journal

Behavior genetics

Published Date

2022/9

The cell adhesion molecule 2 (CADM2) gene has appeared among the top associations in a wide range of genome-wide association studies (GWASs). This study aims to: (1) examine how widespread the role of CADM2 is in behavioural traits, and (2) investigate trait-specific effects on CADM2 expression levels across tissues. We conducted a phenome-wide association study in UK Biobank (N = 12,211–453,349) on 242 psycho-behavioral traits, both at the SNP and the gene-level. For comparison, we repeated the analyses for other large (and high LD) genes. We found significant associations between CADM2 and 50 traits (including cognitive, risk taking, and dietary traits), many more than for the comparison genes. We show that many trait associations are reduced when taking geographical stratification into account. S-Predixcan revealed that CADM2 expression in brain tissues was significantly associated …

DISTINCT ASSOCIATION PATTERNS OF ABNORMAL BRAIN STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION WITH GENE EXPRESSION IN DEPRESSION

Authors

Shu Liu,Abdel Abdellaoui,Guido van Wingen,Karin Verweij

Journal

European Neuropsychopharmacology

Published Date

2022/10/1

Background: Depression is associated with structural and functional brain abnormalities. Depression as well as brain anatomy and function are influenced by genetic factors, but the role of gene expression remains unclear.Methods: We used the two-sample t test to identify the differences in cortical thickness (CT) and amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) in a sample of 1,040 depressed individuals and 1,040 matched controls from the UK biobank. Then, we applied partial least squares (PLS) regression to associate these brain-wide differences with cortical variation of gene expression based on Allen Human Brain Atlas.Results: PLS regression showed that weighted gene expression levels across genome (the first PLS component) were positively associated with CT abnormalities in depression, while they were negatively associated with ALFF abnormalities.Discussion: These findings provide evidence for …

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Abdel Abdellaoui FAQs

What is Abdel Abdellaoui's h-index at Universiteit van Amsterdam?

The h-index of Abdel Abdellaoui has been 54 since 2020 and 60 in total.

What are Abdel Abdellaoui's top articles?

The articles with the titles of

Associations between common genetic variants and income provide insights about the socioeconomic health gradient

Genome-wide association study identifies 30 obsessive-compulsive disorder associated loci

Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis: Research Using the Autism Polygenic Score

Mental illness and cardiovascular health: observational and polygenic score analyses in a population-based cohort study

Gene expression has distinct associations with brain structure and function in major depressive disorder

Burt uses a fallacious motte-and-bailey argument to dispute the value of genetics for social science.

Genome-Wide Association Studies of Coffee Intake in UK/US Participants of European Ancestry Uncover Gene-Cohort Influences

Brain structure and function show distinct relations with genetic predispositions to mental health and cognition

...

are the top articles of Abdel Abdellaoui at Universiteit van Amsterdam.

What are Abdel Abdellaoui's research interests?

The research interests of Abdel Abdellaoui are: Human Genetics, Behavioral Genetics, Population Genetics, Neuroscience

What is Abdel Abdellaoui's total number of citations?

Abdel Abdellaoui has 18,281 citations in total.

What are the co-authors of Abdel Abdellaoui?

The co-authors of Abdel Abdellaoui are John T. Cacioppo, Michel Nivard, Philipp Koellinger, Laura W. Wesseldijk.

    Co-Authors

    H-index: 192
    John T. Cacioppo

    John T. Cacioppo

    University of Chicago

    H-index: 57
    Michel Nivard

    Michel Nivard

    Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam

    H-index: 46
    Philipp Koellinger

    Philipp Koellinger

    University of Wisconsin-Madison

    H-index: 14
    Laura W. Wesseldijk

    Laura W. Wesseldijk

    Karolinska Institutet

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