Abby K. Wood

Abby K. Wood

University of Southern California

H-index: 12

North America-United States

About Abby K. Wood

Abby K. Wood, With an exceptional h-index of 12 and a recent h-index of 12 (since 2020), a distinguished researcher at University of Southern California, specializes in the field of administrative law, campaign finance, empirical legal research, corruption, election law.

His recent articles reflect a diverse array of research interests and contributions to the field:

Disclosing Campaign Financing

Decentralized legislative oversight of bureaucratic policy making

Mind the (Participation) Gap: Vouchers, Voting, and Visibility

The Political Economy of COVID-19 Policy Choices

Voters Use Campaign Finance Transparency and Compliance Information

Financial Inclusion in Politics

Campaign Finance Transparency Affects Legislators’ Election Outcomes and Behavior

Learning from Campaign Finance Information

Abby K. Wood Information

University

University of Southern California

Position

Associate Professor of Law Political Science and Public Policy

Citations(all)

593

Citations(since 2020)

479

Cited By

275

hIndex(all)

12

hIndex(since 2020)

12

i10Index(all)

15

i10Index(since 2020)

13

Email

University Profile Page

University of Southern California

Abby K. Wood Skills & Research Interests

administrative law

campaign finance

empirical legal research

corruption

election law

Top articles of Abby K. Wood

Disclosing Campaign Financing

Authors

Abby K Wood

Published Date

2024

Political committees must report the sources of their contributions and the recipients of their expenditures. Government agencies then make some of that information publicly available. Through intermediaries, voters can the use the campaign financing information to inform their votes. The Supreme Court has usually upheld campaign finance disclosure laws, but in doing so, it has carved out exceptions for certain groups. The jurisprudence has not evolved since Buckley v. Valeo. The court acknowledges that while disclosure might chill speech, its benefits tend to justify disclosure laws. Those benefits are listed as informational, anti-corruption, and enforcement benefits.

Decentralized legislative oversight of bureaucratic policy making

Authors

Janna King,Sean Gailmard,Abby Wood

Journal

Journal of Theoretical Politics

Published Date

2023/10

Congressional oversight is a potentially potent tool to affect policy making and implementation by executive agencies. However, oversight of any agency is dispersed among several committees across the House and Senate. How does this decentralization affect the strategic incentives for oversight by each committee? And how do the strategic incentives of oversight committees align with the collective interest of Congress as a whole? We develop a formal, spatial model of decentralized oversight to investigate these questions. The model shows that when committees have similar interests in affecting agency policy, committees attempt to free ride on each other, and oversight levels are inefficiently low. But if committees have competing interests in affecting agency policy, they engage in “dueling oversight” with little overall effect, and oversight levels are inefficiently high. Overall, we contend that committee oversight …

Mind the (Participation) Gap: Vouchers, Voting, and Visibility

Authors

Abby K Wood,Christopher S Elmendorf,Douglas M Spencer,Nicholas G Napolio

Journal

American Politics Research

Published Date

2022/9

This study exploits the introduction of a new type of public financing of elections—campaign finance vouchers—to estimate the effects of neighborhood-level political cross-pressure on citizens’ decisions to participate in low-cost political activities which vary in their publicness: voting (private) and vouchering (public). Does proximity to ideologically divergent neighbors affect one’s use of publicly disclosed campaign finance vouchers? We find that cross-pressured individuals are slightly more likely to use a campaign finance voucher than similarly situated individuals who are ideologically typical for their precinct. We also find evidence that precinct-level cross-pressure does not drive voucher users to shade their voucher donations toward candidates who are ideologically closer the precinct mean. While our study is limited to a relatively liberal city (Seattle), our results replicated across two election cycles in that city …

The Political Economy of COVID-19 Policy Choices

Authors

Pamela J Clouser McCann,Abby K Wood

Published Date

2022/7/22

The first two years of the COVID-19 pandemic presented many challenges for state governors. States hold the police power, and governors regulated pursuant to that power, via gubernatorial executive orders. Statewide mandates regarding private and public sector closures typically involved exceptions for workers deemed critical to public health and the safety of the community, including those individuals providing basic essential services such as healthcare, power, water, and sanitation services. However, the timing of these orders varied across states, as did the orders’ content, as governors amended and replaced prior orders. In this study, we argue that the political-economic environment of states was associated with specific COVID-policy choices. We marshal several evidentiary domains to conduct the analysis, including text analysis of governors’ pandemic-related executive orders, and analysis of state political-economy types (revealing “open publics” and “private enclaves”). We leverage timing of the orders to analyze state governments’ pandemic responsebetween states that are “open publics” and “private enclaves” as well as between states whose executive orders emphasize health or the economy. We find that the state’s political economy is associated with the governors’ responses to the COVID epidemic in predictable ways. 1

Voters Use Campaign Finance Transparency and Compliance Information

Authors

Abby K Wood

Journal

Political Behavior, DOI: 10.1007/s11109-022-09776-4

Published Date

2022

Campaign finance compliance and transparency reveal important non-policy attributes that voters care about. Using vignette and conjoint survey experiments, I show that voters in primary elections incorporate transparency and compliance considerations into candidate selection. This effect persists even where the candidate shares the respondents’ preferred policy positions. The findings bring campaign finance transparency and compliance into the scholarly conversation about candidate valence. They also have implications for our campaign finance jurisprudence and suggest that courts should expand their understanding of the informational benefits of campaign finance disclosures and compliance information.

Financial Inclusion in Politics

Authors

Abhay P Aneja,Jacob M Grumbach,Abby K Wood

Journal

NYUL Rev.

Published Date

2022

It is time for the courts to take seriously the connection between racial inequality and campaign finance in America. In the United States, political contributions are largely unregulated. Indeed, the Supreme Court has often struck down campaign finance regulations on the theory that political spending is political speech, and restrictions on such spending violate the First Amendment.'Much scholarly attention has been paid to one result of this deregulated environment: Rich people are able to spend massively in campaigns. 2 But as our Article demonstrates, there is another implication that is equally troubling: Non-Latino whites are severely overrepresented in political contributions. We should not be surprised by this result. The legacies of slavery and racial exclusion have generated stark racial inequalities in wealth. By striking down laws limiting political contributions and spending, the Court has elevated the speech …

Campaign Finance Transparency Affects Legislators’ Election Outcomes and Behavior

Authors

Abby K Wood,Christian R Grose

Journal

American Journal of Political Science

Published Date

2021/11/18

Do audits by executive agencies impact the behavior of those audited? Does revealing negative information about legislators affect electoral results and behavior? Institutions that encourage transparency, such as campaign finance disclosure, influence mass and elite behavior. Campaign finance transparency provides information to voters during legislative campaigns about the character of candidates, and this information affects voter and legislator behavior. The US Federal Election Commission conducted random audits of 10% of US House members in the 1970s. This FEC program is the only randomized experiment a US agency has conducted on federal legislators and their electorates. We find that audited legislators were more likely to retire and faced more competitive reelections relative to the control group, an effect that is amplified among incumbents whose audits revealed campaign finance violations …

Learning from Campaign Finance Information

Authors

Abby K Wood

Journal

Emory Law Journal

Published Date

2021/6/6

In an age of dark money the anonymous political spending facilitated by gaps in our campaign finance disclosure laws after Citizens United the Supreme Court's campaign finance disclosure jurisprudence may be on a collision course with campaign finance disclosure laws. It is urgent for the Court to understand the informational benefits of campaign finance disclosure, so it may avoid this collision.Campaign finance transparency teaches us more than one-dimensional information about the candidate's left-or right-leaning policy preferences. It also helps us learn about candidate type. Social scientists, including myself have run several studies examining voter learning from campaign finance information. As I explain in this Article, when voters learn about a candidate's position with regard to dark money, they learn and vote differently than if they did not have that information. Experimental and observational research …

Divided agencies

Authors

Brian D Feinstein,Abby K Wood

Journal

S. Cal. L. Rev.

Published Date

2021

Clashes between presidential appointees and civil servants are frontpage news. Whether styled as a" deep state" hostile to its democratically selected political principals or as bold" resisters" countering those principals' ultra vires proposals, accounts of civil servant opposition are legion. Move beyond headlines, however, and little is known about the impact of political divisions within agencies on their workaday functioning.This Article presents the first comprehensive, empirical examination of the effects of intra-agency political dynamics on policymaking. Leveraging data on political preferences based on campaign donations, we identify" ideological scores" for both appointees and civil servants in dozens of agencies over thirty-four years-the first measure of the political gap between these two groups across agencies and time. We use these scores to examine how ideological divergence between appointees and …

Measuring state capture

Authors

Pamela J Clouser McCann,Douglas M Spencer,Abby K Wood

Journal

Wis. L. REv.

Published Date

2021

In the early weeks of the COVID-19 pandemic, California Governor Gavin Newsom issued Executive Order N-33-20 ordering residents of California to stay home" except as needed to maintain continuity of operations of essential critical infrastructure sectors." Item 15 in the section titled" Industrial, Commercial, Residential, and Sheltering Facilities and Services" declared the following category of workers to be essential:"[w] orkers supporting the entertainment industries, studios, and other related establishments, provided they follow COVID-19 public health guidance around physical distancing." 2 The entertainment industry was not considered a critical infrastructure sector in the initial shutdown order in March 2020.3 Between the first and second executive orders, what made the governor decide that the show must go on? Of course, the entertainment industry is a major player in the political economy of California …

Facebook Political Ads And Accountability: Outside Groups Are Most Negative, Especially When Hiding Donors

Authors

Shomik Jain,Abby K Wood

Journal

arXiv preprint arXiv:2010.01730

Published Date

2020/10/5

The emergence of online political advertising has come with little regulation, allowing political advertisers on social media to avoid accountability. We analyze how transparency and accountability deficits caused by dark money and disappearing groups relate to the sentiment of political ads on Facebook. We obtained 430,044 ads with FEC-registered advertisers from Facebook's ad library that ran between August-November 2018. We compare ads run by candidates, parties, and outside groups, which we classify by (1) their donor transparency (dark money or disclosed) and (2) the group's permanence (only FEC-registered in 2018 or persistent across cycles). The most negative advertising came from dark money and disappearing outside groups, which were mostly corporations or 501(c) organizations. However, only dark money was associated with a significant decrease in ad sentiment. These results suggest that accountability for political speech matters for advertising tone, especially in the context of affective polarization on social media.

Waiting to vote in the 2016 presidential election: Evidence from a multi-county study

Authors

Robert M Stein,Christopher Mann,Charles Stewart III,Zachary Birenbaum,Anson Fung,Jed Greenberg,Farhan Kawsar,Gayle Alberda,R Michael Alvarez,Lonna Atkeson,Emily Beaulieu,Nathaniel A Birkhead,Frederick J Boehmke,Joshua Boston,Barry C Burden,Francisco Cantu,Rachael Cobb,David Darmofal,Thomas C Ellington,Terri Susan Fine,Charles J Finocchiaro,Michael D Gilbert,Victor Haynes,Brian Janssen,David Kimball,Charles Kromkowski,Elena Llaudet,Kenneth R Mayer,Matthew R Miles,David Miller,Lindsay Nielson,Yu Ouyang,Costas Panagopoulos,Andrew Reeves,Min Hee Seo,Haley Simmons,Corwin Smidt,Farrah M Stone,Rachel VanSickle-Ward,Jennifer Nicoll Victor,Abby Wood,Julie Wronski

Journal

Political Research Quarterly

Published Date

2020/6

This paper is the result of a nationwide study of polling place dynamics in the 2016 presidential election. Research teams, recruited from local colleges and universities and located in twenty-eight election jurisdictions across the United States, observed and timed voters as they entered the queue at their respective polling places and then voted. We report results about four specific polling place operations and practices: the length of the check-in line, the number of voters leaving the check-in line once they have joined it, the time for a voter to check in to vote (i.e., verify voter’s identification and obtain a ballot), and the time to complete a ballot. Long lines, waiting times, and times to vote are closely related to time of day (mornings are busiest for polling places). We found the recent adoption of photographic voter identification (ID) requirements to have a disparate effect on the time to check in among white and nonwhite …

Facilitating accountability for online political advertisements

Authors

Abby K Wood

Journal

Ohio St. Tech. LJ

Published Date

2020

The 2016 elections were plagued by online disinformation campaigns and foreign meddling. In their wake, Internet platforms, like Facebook and Google, came under scrutiny to self-regulate or be regulated by the government. Over the past four years, these platforms have taken steps-some significant, some more smoke-and-mirrors-to reduce the threat of foreign meddling and disinformation in our political campaigns. They have done so voluntarily, but in the shadow of threats of regulation.Meanwhile, political messaging continues on social media. Online political speech is particularly useful to small campaigns, such as those at the state and local level, who are unable to afford to run television advertisements. These small campaigns can place ads online for mere pennies per view-or even for free. Foreclosing social media political advertising as an option for candidates and campaigns, as Twitter recently did, is …

See List of Professors in Abby K. Wood University(University of Southern California)

Abby K. Wood FAQs

What is Abby K. Wood's h-index at University of Southern California?

The h-index of Abby K. Wood has been 12 since 2020 and 12 in total.

What are Abby K. Wood's top articles?

The articles with the titles of

Disclosing Campaign Financing

Decentralized legislative oversight of bureaucratic policy making

Mind the (Participation) Gap: Vouchers, Voting, and Visibility

The Political Economy of COVID-19 Policy Choices

Voters Use Campaign Finance Transparency and Compliance Information

Financial Inclusion in Politics

Campaign Finance Transparency Affects Legislators’ Election Outcomes and Behavior

Learning from Campaign Finance Information

...

are the top articles of Abby K. Wood at University of Southern California.

What are Abby K. Wood's research interests?

The research interests of Abby K. Wood are: administrative law, campaign finance, empirical legal research, corruption, election law

What is Abby K. Wood's total number of citations?

Abby K. Wood has 593 citations in total.

What are the co-authors of Abby K. Wood?

The co-authors of Abby K. Wood are David E. Lewis, Sean Gailmard, Francesca R. Jensenius, Jacob M. Grumbach, Pamela Clouser McCann, Nicholas G. Napolio.

    Co-Authors

    H-index: 37
    David E. Lewis

    David E. Lewis

    Vanderbilt University

    H-index: 26
    Sean Gailmard

    Sean Gailmard

    University of California, Berkeley

    H-index: 19
    Francesca R. Jensenius

    Francesca R. Jensenius

    Universitetet i Oslo

    H-index: 15
    Jacob M. Grumbach

    Jacob M. Grumbach

    University of California, Berkeley

    H-index: 7
    Pamela Clouser McCann

    Pamela Clouser McCann

    University of Southern California

    H-index: 4
    Nicholas G. Napolio

    Nicholas G. Napolio

    University of Southern California

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