Abby Grace Drake

Abby Grace Drake

Cornell University

H-index: 11

North America-United States

About Abby Grace Drake

Abby Grace Drake, With an exceptional h-index of 11 and a recent h-index of 11 (since 2020), a distinguished researcher at Cornell University, specializes in the field of Geometric morphometrics, modularity, heterochrony.

His recent articles reflect a diverse array of research interests and contributions to the field:

Equitable Instructor Assessment Changes Amid COVID-19 Pandemic

“Out of my control”: science undergraduates report mental health concerns and inconsistent conditions when using remote proctoring software

Dogs and wolves on the northern plains: A look from beyond the site in Alberta

Eight recommendations to promote effective study habits for biology students enrolled in online courses

Context matters: social psychological factors that underlie academic performance across seven institutions

Meta-analysis of gender performance gaps in undergraduate natural science courses

Forensic Phylogenetics: Implementing Tree-thinking in a Court of Law

What questions are on the minds of STEM undergraduate students and how can they be addressed?

Abby Grace Drake Information

University

Cornell University

Position

EEB Dept.

Citations(all)

1512

Citations(since 2020)

803

Cited By

989

hIndex(all)

11

hIndex(since 2020)

11

i10Index(all)

11

i10Index(since 2020)

11

Email

University Profile Page

Cornell University

Abby Grace Drake Skills & Research Interests

Geometric morphometrics

modularity

heterochrony

Top articles of Abby Grace Drake

Equitable Instructor Assessment Changes Amid COVID-19 Pandemic

Authors

Todd Lamb,Emily P Driessen,Abby E Beatty,Rachel Youngblood,Abby Esco,Sehoya Cotner,Catherine Creech,Abby Grace Drake,Sheritta Fagbodun,Kristen S Hobbs,A Kelly Lane,Erin Larson,Sophie J McCoy,Seth Thompson,Cissy J Ballen

Journal

Journal of College Science Teaching

Published Date

2024/3/3

The coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak mandated a rapid transition to online classes with little warning. Previous literature studying the effects of this sudden shift demonstrated enormous impacts on instructors and students. However, the details concerning science instructor assessment choices during this time are less clear. We asked biology instructors to reflect on the changes they made to their assessments of student learning during the emergency transition to remote instruction in spring 2020 and whether the potential changes were motivated by equity concerns. We also asked instructors to describe the assessment changes they intended to keep in future semesters. Through quantitative and qualitative analyses, we found that instructors removed forms of assessment more often than they added them, and the most common changes included how instructors administered exams and engaged students through …

“Out of my control”: science undergraduates report mental health concerns and inconsistent conditions when using remote proctoring software

Authors

Annika Pokorny,Cissy J Ballen,Abby Grace Drake,Emily P Driessen,Sheritta Fagbodun,Brian Gibbens,Jeremiah A Henning,Sophie J McCoy,Seth K Thompson,Charles G Willis,A Kelly Lane

Journal

International Journal for Educational Integrity

Published Date

2023/11/15

Efforts to discourage academic misconduct in online learning environments frequently include the use of remote proctoring services. While these services are relatively commonplace in undergraduate science courses, there are open questions about students’ remote assessment environments and their concerns related to remote proctoring services. Using a survey distributed to 11 undergraduate science courses engaging in remote instruction at three American, public, research-focused institutions during the spring of 2021, we found that the majority of undergraduate students reported testing in suboptimal environments. Students’ concerns about remote proctoring services were closely tied to technological difficulties, fear of being wrongfully accused of cheating, and negative impacts on mental health. Our results suggest that remote proctoring services can create and perpetuate inequitable assessment …

Dogs and wolves on the northern plains: A look from beyond the site in Alberta

Authors

Robert J Losey,Abby G Drake,Patricia E Ralrick,Christopher N Jass,Angela R Lieverse,Megan Bieraugle,Rebecca Christenson,Karin Steuber

Journal

Journal of Archaeological Science

Published Date

2022/12/1

Indigenous communities on the Northern Great Plains of North America commonly kept dogs as domestic animals. Historical records and previous archaeological research indicate that many of these dogs were large-bodied animals. Both data sources also suggest that wolf-dog interbreeding was common and in part occurred as a means of producing large dogs for use in transport. However, nearly all previous studies of large canid remains on the Great Plains rely on traditional morphometrics, a method that can conflate shape differences with size differences due to isometry. Geometric morphometrics, a method that can factor out such scaling effects, is applied in this study to Late Holocene large canid remains from two non-archaeological locations on the plains of Alberta, Canada. Our results indicate the presence of both dogs and wolves, with many of the wolves experiencing extreme tooth wear and loss and …

Eight recommendations to promote effective study habits for biology students enrolled in online courses

Authors

Sharday N Ewell,Sehoya Cotner,Abby Grace Drake,Sheritta Fagbodun,Angela Google,Lecia Robinson,Paula Soneral,Cissy J Ballen

Published Date

2022/4/29

To achieve meaningful learning experiences in online classrooms, students must become self-regulated learners through the development of effective study habits. Currently, there is no set of recommendations to promote study habits in online biology learning environments. To fill gaps in our understanding, a working group associated with a research coordination network (Equity and Diversity in Undergraduate STEM, EDU-STEM) convened virtually in June 2021. We identify student barriers to self-regulated learning in online environments and present eight practical recommendations to help biology educators and biology education researchers apply and advance evidence-based study habits in online courses. As higher education institutions continue to offer online learning opportunities, we hope this essay equips instructors with the knowledge and tools to promote student success in online biology coursework.

Context matters: social psychological factors that underlie academic performance across seven institutions

Authors

S Salehi,SA Berk,R Brunelli,S Cotner,C Creech,AG Drake,S Fagbodun,C Hall,S Hebert,J Hewlett,AC James,M Shuster,JR St. Juliana,DB Stovall,R Whittington,M Zhong,CJ Ballen

Journal

CBE—Life Sciences Education

Published Date

2021

To enhance equity and diversity in undergraduate biology, recent research in biology education focuses on best practices that reduce learning barriers for all students and improve academic performance. However, the majority of current research into student experiences in introductory biology takes place at large, predominantly White institutions. To foster contextual knowledge in biology education research, we harnessed data from a large research coordination network to examine the extent of academic performance gaps based on demographic status across institutional contexts and how two psychological factors, test anxiety and ethnicity stigma consciousness, may mediate performance in introductory biology. We used data from seven institutions across three institution types: 2-year community colleges, 4-year inclusive institutions (based on admissions selectivity; hereafter, inclusive), and 4-year selective …

Meta-analysis of gender performance gaps in undergraduate natural science courses

Authors

Sara Odom,Halle Boso,Scott Bowling,Sara Brownell,Sehoya Cotner,Catherine Creech,Abby Grace Drake,Sarah Eddy,Sheritta Fagbodun,Sadie Hebert,Avis C James,Jan Just,Justin R St. Juliana,Michele Shuster,Seth K Thompson,Richard Whittington,Bill D Wills,Alan E Wilson,Kelly R Zamudio,Min Zhong,Cissy J Ballen

Journal

CBE—Life Sciences Education

Published Date

2021

To investigate patterns of gender-based performance gaps, we conducted a meta-analysis of published studies and unpublished data collected across 169 undergraduate biology and chemistry courses. While we did not detect an overall gender gap in performance, heterogeneity analyses suggested further analysis was warranted, so we investigated whether attributes of the learning environment impacted performance disparities on the basis of gender. Several factors moderated performance differences, including class size, assessment type, and pedagogy. Specifically, we found evidence that larger classes, reliance on exams, and undisrupted, traditional lecture were associated with lower grades for women. We discuss our results in the context of natural science courses and conclude by making recommendations for instructional practices and future research to promote gender equity.

Forensic Phylogenetics: Implementing Tree-thinking in a Court of Law

Authors

Cissy J Ballen,Abby Grace Drake,Kelly R Zamudio

Published Date

2021/8/28

Here we describe an in-class activity developed for Evolutionary Biology and Biodiversity (BioEE1780) at Cornell University, an introductory course required of all biology majors. This activity offers instructors an engaging and real-life framework for teaching challenging concepts in phylogenetics and tree interpretation. The activity is adapted from a study in forensic phylogenetics reported in Scaduto et al.(2010) that showcased the use of gene genealogies in a court of law to infer willful transmission of a deadly disease to multiple victims.

What questions are on the minds of STEM undergraduate students and how can they be addressed?

Authors

Clara L Meaders,Michelle K Smith,Timothy Boester,Anne Bracy,Brian A Couch,Abby G Drake,Saima Farooq,Bashir Khoda,Cynthia Kinsland,A Kelly Lane,Sarah E Lindahl,William H Livingston,Ayesha Maliwal Bundy,Amber McCormick,Anya I Morozov,Jennifer L Newell-Caito,Katharine J Ruskin,Mark A Sarvary,Marilyne Stains,Justin R St. Juliana,Stephanie R Thomas,Cindy van Es,Erin L Vinson,Maren N Vitousek,Mackenzie R Stetzer

Journal

Frontiers in Education

Published Date

2021/2/22

Addressing common student questions in introductory STEM courses early in the term is one way that instructors can ensure that their students have all been presented with information about how to succeed in their courses. However, categorizing student questions and identifying evidence-based resources to address student questions takes time, and instructors may not be able to easily collect and respond to student questions at the beginning of every course. To help faculty effectively anticipate and respond to student questions, we 1) administered surveys in multiple STEM courses to identify common student questions, 2) conducted a qualitative analysis to determine categories of student questions (e.g., what are best practices for studying, how can in- and out-of- course time be effectively used), and 3) collaboratively identified advice on how course instructors can answer these questions. Here, we share tips, evidence-based strategies, and resources from faculty that instructors can use to develop their own responses for students. We hope that educators can use these common student questions as a starting point to proactively address questions throughout the course and that the compiled resources will allow instructors to easily find materials that can be considered for their own courses.

A call for data-driven networks to address equity in the context of undergraduate biology

Authors

Seth K Thompson,Sadie Hebert,Sara Berk,Rebecca Brunelli,Catherine Creech,Abby Grace Drake,Sheritta Fagbodun,Marcos E Garcia-Ojeda,Carrie Hall,Jordan Harshman,Todd Lamb,Rachael Robnett,Michèle Shuster,Sehoya Cotner,Cissy J Ballen

Journal

CBE—Life Sciences Education

Published Date

2020

National efforts to improve equitable teaching practices in biology education have led to an increase in research on the barriers to student participation and performance, as well as solutions for overcoming these barriers. Fewer studies have examined the extent to which the resulting data trends and effective strategies are generalizable across multiple contexts or are specific to individual classrooms, institutions, or geographic regions. To address gaps in our understanding, as well as to establish baseline information about students across contexts, a working group associated with a research coordination network (Equity and Diversity in Undergraduate STEM, EDU-STEM) convened in Las Vegas, Nevada, in November of 2019. We addressed the following objectives: 1) characterize the present state of equity and diversity in undergraduate biology education research; 2) address the value of a network of educators …

Gender differences in student participation in an active-learning classroom

Authors

Stepfanie M Aguillon,Gregor-Fausto Siegmund,Renee H Petipas,Abby Grace Drake,Sehoya Cotner,Cissy J Ballen

Journal

CBE—Life Sciences Education

Published Date

2020

Overwhelming evidence demonstrating the benefits of active-learning pedagogy has led to a shift in teaching that requires students to interact more in the classroom. To date, few studies have assessed whether there are gender-specific differences in participation in active-learning science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) courses, and fewer have looked across different types of classroom participation. Over two semesters, we observed an introductory biology course at a large research-intensive university and categorized student participation into seven distinct categories to identify gender gaps in participation. Additionally, we collected student grades and administered a postcourse survey that gauged student scientific self-efficacy and salience of gender identity. We found that men participated more than expected based on the class composition in most participation categories. In particular …

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Abby Grace Drake FAQs

What is Abby Grace Drake's h-index at Cornell University?

The h-index of Abby Grace Drake has been 11 since 2020 and 11 in total.

What are Abby Grace Drake's top articles?

The articles with the titles of

Equitable Instructor Assessment Changes Amid COVID-19 Pandemic

“Out of my control”: science undergraduates report mental health concerns and inconsistent conditions when using remote proctoring software

Dogs and wolves on the northern plains: A look from beyond the site in Alberta

Eight recommendations to promote effective study habits for biology students enrolled in online courses

Context matters: social psychological factors that underlie academic performance across seven institutions

Meta-analysis of gender performance gaps in undergraduate natural science courses

Forensic Phylogenetics: Implementing Tree-thinking in a Court of Law

What questions are on the minds of STEM undergraduate students and how can they be addressed?

...

are the top articles of Abby Grace Drake at Cornell University.

What are Abby Grace Drake's research interests?

The research interests of Abby Grace Drake are: Geometric morphometrics, modularity, heterochrony

What is Abby Grace Drake's total number of citations?

Abby Grace Drake has 1,512 citations in total.