Abby Elizabeth Beatty

Abby Elizabeth Beatty

Auburn University

H-index: 7

North America-United States

About Abby Elizabeth Beatty

Abby Elizabeth Beatty, With an exceptional h-index of 7 and a recent h-index of 7 (since 2020), a distinguished researcher at Auburn University, specializes in the field of Biology Education, Physiology, Genetics, Life-History Evolution.

His recent articles reflect a diverse array of research interests and contributions to the field:

Re-envisioning biology curricula to include ideological awareness

Equitable Instructor Assessment Changes Amid COVID-19 Pandemic

Teaching at the intersection of science and society: An activity on healthcare disparities

Suicide risk communication and intervention preferences for veterans and service members

Department of Biology, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849

Evaluating representation in science through a peer-reviewed research study

Biology instructors see value in discussing controversial topics but fear personal and professional consequences

Embracing the inclusion of societal concepts in biology improves student understanding

Abby Elizabeth Beatty Information

University

Auburn University

Position

___

Citations(all)

163

Citations(since 2020)

162

Cited By

6

hIndex(all)

7

hIndex(since 2020)

7

i10Index(all)

4

i10Index(since 2020)

4

Email

University Profile Page

Auburn University

Abby Elizabeth Beatty Skills & Research Interests

Biology Education

Physiology

Genetics

Life-History Evolution

Top articles of Abby Elizabeth Beatty

Re-envisioning biology curricula to include ideological awareness

Authors

Robin A Costello,Abby E Beatty,Ryan DP Dunk,Sharday N Ewell,Jenna E Pruett,Cissy J Ballen

Journal

Research in Science Education

Published Date

2024/2

Addressing the challenges facing society and the world will require an understanding of the biases and limitations of science. To combat these challenges, here, we advocate for the incorporation of ideologically aware (IA) material into postsecondary biology curricula. IA materials communicate to students how biases, assumptions, and stereotypes inform approaches to and outcomes of science. By engaging with IA materials, student awareness of the impact of science on social problems is expected to increase. In this paper, we situate this IA approach with two other pedagogical approaches that incorporate societally relevant content: culturally relevant pedagogy and socioscientific issues. We then call for research to test ways of supporting instructor implementation of IA material, to evaluate the impact of IA topics on student academic and sociopsychological outcomes, and to explore how to implement IA material …

Equitable Instructor Assessment Changes Amid COVID-19 Pandemic

Authors

Todd Lamb,Emily P Driessen,Abby E Beatty,Rachel Youngblood,Abby Esco,Sehoya Cotner,Catherine Creech,Abby Grace Drake,Sheritta Fagbodun,Kristen S Hobbs,A Kelly Lane,Erin Larson,Sophie J McCoy,Seth Thompson,Cissy J Ballen

Journal

Journal of College Science Teaching

Published Date

2024/3/3

The coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak mandated a rapid transition to online classes with little warning. Previous literature studying the effects of this sudden shift demonstrated enormous impacts on instructors and students. However, the details concerning science instructor assessment choices during this time are less clear. We asked biology instructors to reflect on the changes they made to their assessments of student learning during the emergency transition to remote instruction in spring 2020 and whether the potential changes were motivated by equity concerns. We also asked instructors to describe the assessment changes they intended to keep in future semesters. Through quantitative and qualitative analyses, we found that instructors removed forms of assessment more often than they added them, and the most common changes included how instructors administered exams and engaged students through …

Teaching at the intersection of science and society: An activity on healthcare disparities

Authors

Paula E Adams,Enya Granados,Abby E Beatty,Cissy J Ballen

Journal

Biology Methods and Protocols

Published Date

2024/1/1

Understanding the relationship between science and society is an objective of science education and is included as a core competency in the AAAS Vision and Change guidelines for biology education. However, traditional undergraduate biology instruction emphasizes scientific practice and generally avoids potentially controversial issues at the intersection of biology and society. By including these topics in biology coursework, instructors can challenge damaging ideologies and systemic inequalities that have influenced science, such as biological essentialism and health disparities. Specifically, an ideologically aware curriculum highlights how ideologies and paradigms shape our biological knowledge base and the application of that knowledge. Ideologically aware lessons emphasize the relationship between science and society with an aim to create more transparent, scientifically accurate, and inclusive …

Suicide risk communication and intervention preferences for veterans and service members

Authors

Abby E Beatty,John S Richardson,Sonja V Batten,Steven Weintraub,Karen Hogan,Keith Hotle

Journal

Frontiers in public health

Published Date

2023/11/21

Despite the investment of public resources to fight staggering suicide rates among veterans, we know little about how veterans and service members in crisis communicate suicidal ideations, and what interventions they are willing to receive. We aim to identify communication and suicide intervention preferences of veterans and service members in times of crisis. Descriptive statistics were used to explore veterans communication of suicidal ideations. While 89.9% of participants indicated they were willing to speak to someone when having thoughts of suicide, less than 26% of participants indicated they were willing to bring up their thoughts with a crisis line or veterans organization. Rather, they indicate that family members (62.2%) and military friends (51.1%) would be their primary outreach. Logistic regression was used to determine whether or not preferred interventions varied by participant demographic characteristics. While the majority of participants indicated they were willing to allow intervention (88.6%), no one method was accepted by the majority of the population. The most accepted means of communication was to proactively contact a friend or family member about general life struggles (32.6%) or suicide-specific concerns (27.5%). Many participants were open to receiving resources (42.0%), suicide-specific mental health treatment (36.3%), and some sort of lethal means safety intervention (19.1%–26.4%). The age, marital status, and veterans status of participants significantly impacted what interventions they were willing to allow. We discuss the implications of these findings and the need for evidence-based, multimodal interventions …

Department of Biology, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849

Authors

Emily Driessen,Abby Beatty,Alexis Stokes,Sara Wood,Cissy Ballen

Journal

Characterizing and Changing Course Elements in Undergraduate Biology Education

Published Date

2023/5/6

The Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak forced an emergency transition to online classes across the world with little warning or instruction for faculty and students. The goal of this research was to document how this response impacted undergraduate students studying the principles of evolution in an introductory organismal biology class over time; specifically, how their study habits for exams differed (1) one week and (2) one month after a university’s decision to transition to emergency remote instruction. We asked students about the extent to which

Evaluating representation in science through a peer-reviewed research study

Authors

CJ Ballen,AE Beatty,E Granados

Journal

CourseSource

Published Date

2023/1

The demographic representation of scientists featured in biology curricular materials do not match that of the undergraduate biology student population or of the US population. In this lesson, we promote awareness of inequity in science through an exercise that encourages students to think about who is depicted as scientists in science curricular materials—specifically, biology textbooks. After a brief lecture on the scientific method, students read an excerpt from the introduction of a peer-reviewed publication that provides background information on the importance of representation in science. Next, students collect data from their own biology textbook about the representation of scientists who possess different identities and make a table depicting their results. Then, students fill in predictive graphs about demographic representation over time with respect to scientist identities including perceived gender and race/ethnicity. Students compare their predictions with the results from the peer-reviewed article and discuss the implications of the results. Finally, students apply their new knowledge by designing an experiment that would examine representation of an alternative scientist identity, such as age. Students conclude by answering questions that gauge their knowledge of the scientific method. This activity uses a peer-reviewed publication as well as authentic data generated by the student to increase ideological awareness and teach societal influences on the process of science.

Biology instructors see value in discussing controversial topics but fear personal and professional consequences

Authors

Abby E Beatty,Emily P Driessen,Amanda D Clark,Robin A Costello,Sharday Ewell,Sheritta Fagbodun,Randy L Klabacka,Todd Lamb,Kimberly Mulligan,Jeremiah A Henning,Cissy J Ballen

Journal

CBE—Life Sciences Education

Published Date

2023

Traditional biology curricula depict science as an objective field, overlooking the important influence that human values and biases have on what is studied and who can be a scientist. We can work to address this shortcoming by incorporating ideological awareness into the curriculum, which is an understanding of biases, stereotypes, and assumptions that shape contemporary and historical science. We surveyed a national sample of lower-level biology instructors to determine 1) why it is important for students to learn science, 2) the perceived educational value of ideological awareness in the classroom, and 3) hesitancies associated with ideological awareness implementation. We found that most instructors reported “understanding the world” as the main goal of science education. Despite the perceived value of ideological awareness, such as increasing student engagement and dispelling misconceptions …

Embracing the inclusion of societal concepts in biology improves student understanding

Authors

Paula E Adams,Emily P Driessen,Enya Granados,Penny Ragland,Jeremiah A Henning,Abby E Beatty,Cissy J Ballen

Journal

Frontiers in Education

Published Date

2023/7

Understanding the relationship between science and society is included as a core competency for biology students in the United States. However, traditional undergraduate biology instruction emphasizes scientific practice and generally avoids potentially controversial issues at the intersection of science and society, such as representation in STEM, historical unethical research experiments, biology of sex and gender, and environmental justice. As calls grow to highlight this core competency, it is critical we investigate the impact of including these topics in undergraduate biology education. Here, we implemented a semester-long ideological awareness curriculum that emphasized biases, stereotypes, and assumptions that have shaped historical and contemporary science. We taught this curriculum to one section of a non-majors introductory biology course and compared the outcomes to a section of the same course taught using traditional biology content (hereafter the ‘traditional’ section) that did not emphasize societal topics. Both sections of students created concept maps for their final exam, which we coded for ‘society’ and ‘biology’ content. We then assessed (1) the amount of societal content included in the concept maps, and (2) which societal topics were mentioned in each section. We found that students in the ideologically aware section included more societal content in their concept maps than the students in the traditional section. Students exposed to the ideological awareness modules often mentioned the topics covered in those modules, whereas students in the traditional section most commonly mentioned faulty scientific information …

Why students struggle in undergraduate Biology: Sources and solutions

Authors

Claire B Tracy,Emily P Driessen,Abby E Beatty,Todd Lamb,Jenna E Pruett,Jake D Botello,Cara Brittain,Ísada Claudio Ford,Chloe C Josefson,Randy L Klabacka,Tyler Smith,Ariel Steele,Min Zhong,Scott Bowling,Lucinda Dixon,Cissy J Ballen

Journal

CBE—Life Sciences Education

Published Date

2022

Students’ perceptions of challenges in biology influence performance outcomes, experiences, and persistence in science. Identifying sources of student struggle can assist efforts to support students as they overcome challenges in their undergraduate educations. In this study, we characterized student experiences of struggle by 1) quantifying which external factors relate to perceptions of encountering and overcoming struggle in introductory biology and 2) identifying factors to which students attribute their struggle in biology. We found a significant effect of Course, Instructor, and Incoming Preparation on student struggle, in which students with lower Incoming Preparation were more likely to report struggle and the inability to overcome struggle. We also observed significant differences in performance outcomes between students who did and did not encounter struggle and between students who did and did not …

Postnatal expression of IGF2 is the norm in amniote vertebrates

Authors

Abby Beatty,Alexander M Rubin,Haruka Wada,Britt Heidinger,Wendy R Hood,Tonia S Schwartz

Journal

Proceedings of the Royal Society B

Published Date

2022/2/23

The insulin and insulin-like signalling (IIS) network plays an important role in mediating several life-history traits, including growth, reproduction and senescence. Although insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) 1 and 2 are both key hormones in the vertebrate IIS network, research on IGF2 in juveniles and adults has been largely neglected because early biomedical research on rodents found negligible IGF2 postnatal expression. Here, we challenge this assumption and ask to what degree IGF2 is expressed during postnatal life across amniotes by quantifying the relative gene expression of IGF1 and IGF2 using publicly available RNAseq data for 82 amniote species and quantitative polymerase chain reaction on liver cDNA at embryonic, juvenile and adult stages for two lizard, bird and mouse species. We found that (i) IGF2 is expressed postnatally across amniote species and life stages—often at a higher relative …

Sprint training interacts with body mass to affect hepatic insulin-like growth factor expression in female green anoles (Anolis carolinensis)

Authors

Jamie R Marks,Abby E Beatty,Jerry F Husak,Tonia S Schwartz,Simon P Lailvaux

Journal

General and Comparative Endocrinology

Published Date

2022/5/28

Locomotor performance is a key predictor of fitness in many animal species. As such, locomotion integrates the output of a number of morphological, physiological, and molecular levels of organization, yet relatively little is known regarding the major molecular pathways that bolster locomotor performance. One potentially relevant pathway is the insulin and insulin-like signaling (IIS) network, a significant regulator of physiological processes such as reproduction, growth, and metabolism. Two primary hormones of this network, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) and insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) are important mediators of these processes and, consequently, of life-history strategies. We sprint-trained green anole (Anolis carolinensis) females to test the responsiveness of IGF1 and IGF2 hepatic gene expression to exercise training. We also tested how sprint training would affect glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate …

Oral presentation: Evaluating open-note examinations: student perceptions and preparation methods in an undergraduate biology course

Authors

Emily Driessen,Abby Beatty,Cissy Ballen

Journal

16th Annual Tennessee STEM Education Research Conference January 13-14, 2022

Published Date

2022/1/13

Vision and Change: A Call to Action, outlined six core competencies intended to guide undergraduate biology education, including the application of science and critical thinking (1). However, the common way we evaluate student competencies (ie, via closed-note multiplechoice testing) rewards and emphasizes the memorization of details rather than the development of critical-thinking abilities (2-4). Open-note testing has the potential to shift this emphasis (5), as other disciplines have demonstrated (6). Proponents of open-note testing applaud the ability to focus students on gathering and critically analyzing material from multiple sources rather than storing information for quick retrieval (7, 8) and its ability to decrease student testing anxiety (9-11). Opponents of open-note testing criticize their inability to increase student performance (12, 13), however, these claims are contested (14, 15). As we know exam …

Students who prefer face-to-face tests outperform their online peers in organic chemistry

Authors

Abby E Beatty,Abby Esco,Ashley BC Curtiss,Cissy J Ballen

Journal

Chemistry Education Research and Practice

Published Date

2022

To test the hypothesis that students who complete remote online tests experience an ‘online grade penalty’, we compared performance outcomes of second-year students who elected to complete exams online to those who completed face-to-face, paper-based tests in an organic chemistry course. We pursued the following research questions: (RQ1) Are there performance gaps between students who elect to take online tests and those who take face-to-face tests? (RQ2) Do these two groups differ with respect to other affective or incoming performance attributes? How do these attributes relate to performance overall? (RQ3) How does performance differ between students who reported equal in-class engagement but selected different testing modes? (RQ4) Why do students prefer one testing mode over the other? We found that students who elected to take online tests consistently underperformed relative to those …

Evaluating open-note exams: Student perceptions and preparation methods in an undergraduate biology class

Authors

Emily P Driessen,Abby E Beatty,Cissy J Ballen

Journal

Plos one

Published Date

2022/8/18

Although closed-note exams have traditionally been used to evaluate students in undergraduate biology classes, open-note exams are becoming increasingly common, though little is known about how students prepare for these types of exams. We investigated student perceptions of and their preparation habits for online open-note exams in an undergraduate biology class, as compared to their previous experiences with closed-note exams in other classes. Specifically, we explored the following research questions: (1a) How do students perceive open-note exams impact their exam scores, their anxiety, the amount they studied, and the amount their peers studied? (1b) How do these perceptions impact performance outcomes? (2a) How do students prepare for open-note exams? (2b) How do these preparation methods impact performance outcomes? Results demonstrate students perceived increased exam scores, decreased exam-anxiety, decreased study time spent personally, and decreased study time spent by their peers for open-note exams, as compared to past experiences with closed-note exams. Open-ended survey responses analyzed through first- and second-cycle analyses showed students adapted their study habits by focusing on note preparation and broad conceptual understanding rather than rote memorization. Using linear mixed effects models to assess student performance, we found students who focused on understanding, note preparation and using external resources outperformed students who did not report those study habits. As institutions shift towards flexible and scalable assessments that can be used in face-to …

Preparing student study guides through peer collaboration in the technological era

Authors

Abby E Beatty

Published Date

2021/8/30

BACKGROUNDStudy guides are often used as learning directors in undergraduate courses, and are known to assist in learning, increase student involvement, provide students with an understanding of expectations, and improve material comprehension and metacognition (1). Study guides are supportive of active learning goals, as they encourage effective study skills and independent learning (2). However, both the method of production and the method of review can highly alter the effectiveness of such materials.

Teaching between the lines: Representation in science textbooks

Authors

Dasia Y Simpson,Abby E Beatty,Cissy J Ballen

Published Date

2021/1

Science textbooks communicate fundamental discoveries and serve as platforms showcasing role models for students. However, the scientists represented across undergraduate textbooks do not reflect the demographic makeup of the student population reading those materials. We recommend a series of changes within curricula to challenge the stereotypical identity of science.

Tails of reproduction: Regeneration leads to increased reproductive investment

Authors

Abby E Beatty,David M Mote,Tonia S Schwartz

Journal

Journal of Experimental Zoology Part A: Ecological and Integrative Physiology

Published Date

2021/6/1

Trade‐offs between life‐history traits are due to limited resources or constraints in the regulation of genetic and physiological networks. Tail autotomy, with subsequent regeneration, is a common anti‐predation mechanism in lizards and is predicted to trade‐off with life‐history traits, such as reproduction. We utilize the brown anole lizard with its unusual reproductive pattern of single‐egg clutches every 7–10 days to test for a trade‐off in reproductive investment over 8 weeks of tail regeneration on a limited diet. In contrast to predictions, we found that investing in tissue regeneration had a positive effect on reproduction in terms of egg size (11.7% relative to controls) and hatchling size (11.5% relative to controls), and no effect on egg number or survival, with the increase in reproduction starting at peak regeneration. We discuss mechanistic hypotheses that the process of regeneration may cause increased energetic …

Teaching the tough topics: fostering ideological awareness through the inclusion of societally impactful topics in introductory biology

Authors

Abby E Beatty,Emily P Driessen,Taylor Gusler,Sharday Ewell,Amy Grilliot,Cissy J Ballen

Journal

CBE—Life Sciences Education

Published Date

2021

While science has profound social impacts, we often teach biology as removed from societally debated issues. Here, we address this gap in biology education through the implementation of novel materials that promote ideological awareness (IA). Using mixed-method analyses, we explore students’ perceptions of the relationship between science and society, as well as their attitudes toward and knowledge of IA in biology. We found students that received the IA curriculum reported relationships between science and society that aligned with the IA activities, such as providing solutions to societal problems and combating misinformation. Additionally, we discovered a preference for IA materials over a traditional curriculum, with persons excluded because of their ethnicity and race (PEERs) reporting greater approval than non-PEERs. Although we found that the IA curriculum did not result in significant gains in science …

Addressing the unique qualities of upper-level biology course-based undergraduate research experiences through the integration of skill-building

Authors

Abby E Beatty,Cissy J Ballen,Emily P Driessen,Tonia S Schwartz,Rita M Graze

Journal

Integrative and Comparative Biology

Published Date

2021/5/3

Early exposure to course-based undergraduate research experiences (CUREs) in introductory biology courses can promote positive student outcomes such as increased confidence, critical thinking, and views of applicability in lower-level courses, but it is unknown if these same impacts are achieved by upper-level courses. Upper-level courses differ from introductory courses in several ways, and one difference that could impact these positive student outcomes is the importance of balancing structure with independence in upper-level CUREs where students typically have more autonomy and greater complexity in their research projects. Here we compare and discuss two formats of upper-level biology CUREs (Guided and Autonomous) that vary along a continuum between structure and independence. We share our experiences teaching an upper-level CURE in two different formats and contrast those formats …

Expression of insulin-like growth factors depends on both mass and resource availability in female green anoles (Anolis carolinensis)

Authors

Jamie R Marks,Abby E Beatty,Tonia S Schwartz,Mahaut Sorlin,Simon P Lailvaux

Journal

Journal of Experimental Biology

Published Date

2021/8/1

The insulin and insulin-like signaling (IIS) network is an important mediator of cellular growth and metabolism in animals, and is sensitive to environmental conditions such as temperature and resource availability. The two main hormones of the IIS network, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) and insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2), are present in all vertebrates, yet little is known regarding the responsiveness of IGF2 in particular to external stimuli in non-mammalian animals. We manipulated diet (low or high quantity of food: low and high diet group, respectively) in adult green anole (Anolis carolinensis) females to test the effect of energetic state on hepatic gene expression of IGF1 and IGF2. The absolute expression of IGF2 in female green anoles was 100 times higher than that of IGF1 regardless of diet treatment, and IGF1 and IGF2 expression interacted with post-treatment body mass and treatment, as did the …

See List of Professors in Abby Elizabeth Beatty University(Auburn University)

Abby Elizabeth Beatty FAQs

What is Abby Elizabeth Beatty's h-index at Auburn University?

The h-index of Abby Elizabeth Beatty has been 7 since 2020 and 7 in total.

What are Abby Elizabeth Beatty's top articles?

The articles with the titles of

Re-envisioning biology curricula to include ideological awareness

Equitable Instructor Assessment Changes Amid COVID-19 Pandemic

Teaching at the intersection of science and society: An activity on healthcare disparities

Suicide risk communication and intervention preferences for veterans and service members

Department of Biology, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849

Evaluating representation in science through a peer-reviewed research study

Biology instructors see value in discussing controversial topics but fear personal and professional consequences

Embracing the inclusion of societal concepts in biology improves student understanding

...

are the top articles of Abby Elizabeth Beatty at Auburn University.

What are Abby Elizabeth Beatty's research interests?

The research interests of Abby Elizabeth Beatty are: Biology Education, Physiology, Genetics, Life-History Evolution

What is Abby Elizabeth Beatty's total number of citations?

Abby Elizabeth Beatty has 163 citations in total.

What are the co-authors of Abby Elizabeth Beatty?

The co-authors of Abby Elizabeth Beatty are Simon P. Lailvaux, Tonia Schwartz, Britt Heidinger, Wendy R Hood, Cissy Ballen, Jeremiah A Henning.

    Co-Authors

    H-index: 27
    Simon P. Lailvaux

    Simon P. Lailvaux

    University of New Orleans

    H-index: 26
    Tonia Schwartz

    Tonia Schwartz

    Auburn University

    H-index: 24
    Britt Heidinger

    Britt Heidinger

    North Dakota State University

    H-index: 24
    Wendy R Hood

    Wendy R Hood

    Auburn University

    H-index: 22
    Cissy Ballen

    Cissy Ballen

    Auburn University

    H-index: 16
    Jeremiah A Henning

    Jeremiah A Henning

    University of South Alabama

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