Abantika Sengupta

Abantika Sengupta

Katholieke Universiteit Leuven

H-index: 4

Europe-Belgium

About Abantika Sengupta

Abantika Sengupta, With an exceptional h-index of 4 and a recent h-index of 4 (since 2020), a distinguished researcher at Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, specializes in the field of Building Physics, Building Energy Modelling, Facade design, Advanced Building Components, Sustainable Design.

His recent articles reflect a diverse array of research interests and contributions to the field:

Typical and extreme weather datasets for studying the resilience of buildings to climate change and heatwaves

Impact of heatwaves and system shocks on a nearly zero energy educational building: Is it resilient to overheating?

Resilient cooling in office buildings: case study in Belgium

Evaluation of thermal resilience to overheating for an educational building in future heatwave scenarios

Performance comparison of different ventilation strategies in elderly care homes in Belgium

A novel quantitative assessment framework of the IAQ resilience performance of buildings: The resilience score metric

Which design parameters impact the resilience to overheating in a typical apartment building?

International Energy Agency-Resilient Cooling of Buildings-State of the Art Review

Abantika Sengupta Information

University

Katholieke Universiteit Leuven

Position

PhD student

Citations(all)

132

Citations(since 2020)

132

Cited By

0

hIndex(all)

4

hIndex(since 2020)

4

i10Index(all)

2

i10Index(since 2020)

2

Email

University Profile Page

Katholieke Universiteit Leuven

Abantika Sengupta Skills & Research Interests

Building Physics

Building Energy Modelling

Facade design

Advanced Building Components

Sustainable Design

Top articles of Abantika Sengupta

Typical and extreme weather datasets for studying the resilience of buildings to climate change and heatwaves

Authors

Anaïs Machard,Agnese Salvati,Mamak Tootkaboni,Abhishek Gaur,Jiwei Zou,Liangzhu Wang,Fuad Baba,Hua Ge,Facundo Bre,Emmanuel Bozonnet,Vincenzo Corrado,Xuan Luo,Ronnen Levinson,Sang Hoon Lee,Tianzhen Hong,Marcello Salles Olinger,Rayner Maurício,Silva Machado,Emeli Lalesca Aparecida da Guarda,Rodolfo Kirch Veiga,Roberto Lambert,Afshin Afshari,Delphine Ramon,Hoang Ngoc Dung Ngo,Abantika Sengupta,Hilde Breesch,Nicolas Heijmans,Jade Deltour,Xavier Kuborn,Sana Sayadi,Bin Qian,Chen Zhang,Ramin Rahif,Shady Attia,Philipp Stern,Peter Holzer

Journal

Scientific Data

Published Date

2024/7/15

We present unprecedented datasets of current and future projected weather files for building simulations in 15 major cities distributed across ten climate zones worldwide. The datasets include ambient air temperature, relative humidity, atmospheric pressure, direct and diffuse solar irradiance, and wind speed at hourly resolution, which are essential climate elements needed to undertake building simulations. The datasets contain typical and extreme weather years in the EnergyPlus weather file (EPW) format and multiyear projections in comma-separated value (CSV) format for three periods: historical (2001-2020), future mid-term (2041-2060), and future long-term (2081-2100). The datasets were generated from projections of one regional climate model, which were bias-corrected using multiyear observational data for each city. The methodology used makes the datasets among the first to incorporate complex changes in the future climate for the frequency, duration, and magnitude of extreme temperatures. These datasets, created within the IEA EBC Annex 80 “Resilient Cooling for Buildings”, are ready to be used for different types of building adaptation and resilience studies to climate change and heatwaves.

Impact of heatwaves and system shocks on a nearly zero energy educational building: Is it resilient to overheating?

Authors

Abantika Sengupta,Douaa Al Assaad,Josué Borrajo Bastero,Marijke Steeman,Hilde Breesch

Journal

Building and Environment

Published Date

2023/4/15

The characteristic that describes the extent to which buildings and their systems maintain their performance during shocks is called resilience. Building policies in the EU have already addressed the resilience of buildings against possible hazards (ie, natural disasters, extreme weathers, fires). However, with increasing overheating risks (eg, climate change) accompanied by their detrimental health and economic impacts, the thermal performance of nearly zero energy buildings (nZEB) is not guaranteed. This study aims to assess the impact of shocks and combinations on the thermal resilience of educational nZEB against heatwaves (HW) and system shocks (SS) including failure of indirect evaporative cooling (IEC), natural night ventilation (NNV) and solar shading failure (SF). A Modelica model of the building was developed and experimentally validated. Shocks were classified and quantified using the novel …

Resilient cooling in office buildings: case study in Belgium

Authors

Joost Declercq,Shiva Khosravi,Abantika Sengupta,Hilde Breesch

Published Date

2023/3/7

To achieve future-proof buildings, it is crucial to design buildings and systems that can withstand to shocks (like heat waves and power outages) and reduce the impact of shocks on thermal comfort in a building. This is known as resilience to overheating.However, shocks are not included in daily building design practice. Practitioners still have the question:“how to design a building that is resilient to overheating?”. To answer this question, IEA EBC Annex 80: Resilient Cooling of Buildings translated its results into Resilient Cooling Guidelines (Corrado et al., 2023). The case study from these guidelines is the subject of this summary/presentation.

Evaluation of thermal resilience to overheating for an educational building in future heatwave scenarios

Authors

Abantika Sengupta,Hilde Breesch,Douaa Al Assaad,Marijke Steeman

Journal

International Journal of Ventilation

Published Date

2023/10/2

Airtight and highly insulated buildings are subjected to overheating risks, even in moderate climates, due to unforeseeable events like frequent heatwaves and power outages. Educational buildings share a major portion of building stocks and a large percentage of the energy is expended in maintaining thermal comfort in these buildings. Overheating risks in educational buildings can lead to heat-stress and negatively impact the health conditions and also cognitive performance of the occupants. In the light of increasing severity and longevity of heat waves in future climate scenarios, and associated power outages occurring during the heatwaves, measures to reduce overheating risk while limiting the cooling energy is gaining importance. Since the performance of existing buildings are not guaranteed during events like heatwaves, power outages, it is crucial for these buildings to be resilient to overheating. (Building …

Performance comparison of different ventilation strategies in elderly care homes in Belgium

Authors

Douaa Al Assaad,Quinten Carton,Abantika Sengupta,Hilde Breesch

Published Date

2023/3/6

Elderly people residing in nursing homes spend a vast majority of their times indoors and often in common recreation areas, to allow for socialization and interaction. Elderly people are a vulnerable age group. Hence, it is essential to provide them with good breathable air quality during these common activities and reduce cross contamination through ventilation. Prolonged exposures of elderly to contaminants may adversely affect their health, quality of life and increase medical expenditures due to frequent hospitalizations. In Belgian elderly care homes, 3 typical ventilation strategies are commonly found (natural ventilation, extract and balanced mechanical ventilation). The aim of this work is to determine the windows opening strategies and duration for the ventilation strategies to deliver good indoor air quality. The impact of window opening on thermal comfort and energy use during heating and cooling season will be assessed. To conduct this work, models of the common room and equipped systems were developed in Modelica. The performance was assessed using two indicators: ppm. hours (for CO2), degree. hours, and days where RH (%) went outside the acceptable [30-70]% range.

A novel quantitative assessment framework of the IAQ resilience performance of buildings: The resilience score metric

Authors

Douaa Al Assaad,Abantika Sengupta,Hilde Breesch

Journal

Building and Environment

Published Date

2023/9/1

Resilience performance in building design has emerged as a critical consideration in the face of increasing uncertainties or ‘shocks’ posed by natural disasters, climate change & excessive pollution. To evaluate and optimize building design decisions, holistic performance metrics are needed. This work defines a novel quantitative assessment framework of indoor air quality (IAQ) resilience which output is the resilience score (RS) metric that integrates all resilience aspects and building-relevant pollutants. The framework was demonstrated via simulations on a validated model of a case study educational building in Belgium for 3 ventilations systems: constant air volume (CAV), demand-controlled ventilation (DCV), DCV without filters, and 3 shock types (mechanical MS, internal IS, outdoor shocks OS). Results showed that OS was the least critical shock type, followed by IS and MS. With increasing degree of shock …

Which design parameters impact the resilience to overheating in a typical apartment building?

Authors

Abantika Sengupta,Jef Kerckaert,Marijke Steeman,Hilde Breesch

Published Date

2023/3/5

Airtight, highly insulated, and passively cooled buildings in the EU are designed under typical outdoor and indoor thermal conditions. With increasing risk and uncertainty with regards to climate change and associated heatwaves (HW), the design thermal performance of these buildings is not guaranteed. It is crucial to focus on improving thermal resilience to overheating and futureproof these buildings.“Thermal resilience to overheating” is the characteristic that describes the extent to which buildings and their cooling strategies can maintain habitable conditions during or post shocks. Thus, a new design approach to improve the thermal resilience to overheating of existing and newly built buildings is a growing need in the building sector. Within the framework of IEA EBC Annex 80-Resilient Cooling of Buildings, the aim of this study is to determine the most influential building and system design parameters that impact the thermal resilience to overheating. To achieve this aim, building energy simulation (BES), is conducted on a reference typical apartment building in Belgium. A 2 bedroom apartment for 3 occupants is simulated in Open Studio and EnergyPlus during summer (April-September) of typical meteorological year (TMY). The apartment is evaluated with its default design (very heavy thermal mass, window to wall ratio (WWR) 10% and with no shading and no passive cooling strategy (in this case natural night ventilation-NNV). Apart from the default design, design parameters were altered such as thermal mass (very heavy-mediumlight), WWR (10-30%), implementation of solar shading and NNV. The impact of the worst, improved and the …

International Energy Agency-Resilient Cooling of Buildings-State of the Art Review

Authors

Zhengtao Ai,Jan Akander,Edward Arens,Taha Arghand,Shady Attia,Dragos-Ioan Bogatu,Hilde Breesch,Mathias Cehlin,Giacomo Chiesa,Feryal Chtioui,Essam El Nagar,Abolfazl Hayati,Per Heiselberg,Peter Holzer,Saqib Javed,Ongun B Kacanzi,Maria Kolokotroni,Vincent Lemort,Ronnen Levinson,Ardeshir Mahdavi,Bjarne W Olesen,Patrick Salagnac,Agnese Salvati,Sana Sayadi,Stephen Selkowitz,Abantika Sengupta,Behzad Sodagar,Philipp Stern,Helene Teufl,Nari Yoon,Chen Zhang,Guoqiang Zhang,Hui Zhang,Michele Zinzi,Ramin Rahif,Sadegh Forghani

Published Date

2023

The world is facing a rapid increase of air conditioning of buildings. It is the motivation of Annex 80 to develop, assess and communicate solutions of resilient cooling and overheating protection. Resilient Cooling is used to denote low energy and low carbon cooling solutions that strengthen the ability of individuals and our community to withstand, and prevent, thermal and other impacts of changes in global and local climates. It encompasses the assessment and Research & Development of both active and passive cooling technologies of the following four groups: - Reduce heat loads to people and indoor environments. - Remove sensible heat from indoor environments. - Enhance personal comfort apart from space cooling. - Remove latent heat from indoor environments. The present review sums up the state of the art in cooling solutions which may be regarded as resilient. Its main objective is to systematically describe the available cooling solutions, their physical basis, their benefits and limitations, their technology readiness level, their practical availability, and applicability. Doing so, the State-of-the-Art Review forms the basis for the work of EBC Annex 80.

Thermal resilience to overheating assessment in a Belgian educational building with passive cooling strategies during heatwaves and power outages

Authors

Abantika Sengupta,Douaa Al Assaad,Marijke Steeman,Hilde Breesch

Journal

E3S Web of Conferences

Published Date

2023

Airtight and highly insulated educational buildings are subjected to overheating risks, even in moderate climates, due to unforeseeable events like frequent heatwaves (HWs) and power outages (POs) leading to heat-stress and negative impact on the health conditions and cognitive performance of the students. The focus of this paper is to evaluate thermal resilience for two lecture rooms equipped with the low-energy cooling strategies natural night ventilation (NNV) and indirect evaporative cooling (IEC). To assess the thermal resilience to overheating, the lecture rooms were tested with and without passive cooling strategies for 3 Typical meteorological years (TMYs), 3 severe HWs and those 3 HWs + POs. Results evaluating the existing indicators unmet degree hours, indoor overheating degree (IOD), ambient warmness degree (AWD), and overheating escalation factor (αIOD) demonstrated that with passive …

Demand-controlled ventilation in educational buildings: Energy efficient but is it resilient?

Authors

Douaa Al Assaad,Abantika Sengupta,Hilde Breesch

Journal

Building and Environment

Published Date

2022/12/1

Educational buildings with smart ventilation are designed under known indoor and outdoor conditions. However, buildings can face sudden shocks that compromise IAQ. The characteristic that describes the extent to which buildings and their ventilation systems can maintain habitable conditions during shocks is “ventilation resilience”. This study aims to assess the ventilation resilience of demand-controlled ventilation (DCV) in an existing educational building. To reach those aims, a Modelica model of the building was developed and experimentally validated. Shocks were classified into mechanical (MS), internal (IS), and outdoor (OS) and quantified using the degree of shock (d o S). Results showed that DCV had similar resilience to a constant air volume (CAV) regarding CO 2, driving the DCV operation but 53–62% worse for VOCs. For CO 2, for DCV and CAV, until d o S< 0.045, IS was 29.5% and 56.1% more …

Impact of future climate on the performances of ground-source cooling system

Authors

Abantika Sengupta,Tom Trioen,Hilde Breesch,Marijke Steeman

Journal

2022: CLIMA 2022 The 14th REHVA HVAC World Congress

Published Date

2022

Newly constructed and renovated dwellings in Belgium are designed for the current climate context. However, due to the effects of global warming, extreme weather conditions like warmer summers and frequent heatwaves are expected in future climate scenarios. Future climate scenarios are nowadays mostly not taken into consideration during the building design process. This paper studies a case study dwelling equipped with a ground-water heat pump coupled with a heat exchanger to provide passive floor cooling, derived from two vertical boreholes with a depth of 100 meters. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of future climate scenario on the thermal comfort and the performance of radiant floor cooling system in a Belgian dwelling. Monitoring of the case study building (April-October 2020) and BuildingEnergy Simulations (BES) in Open studio and EnergyPlus were conducted. Future weather files (future mid-term-2050s and future long-term-2090s according to the RCP8. 5-scenario) were developed in the framework of IEA EBC Annex 80 Resilient Cooling of Buildings. The performance of the floor cooling system was analysed for four different climate scenarios for Melle, Belgium: typical historical-2010s, 2020 including a heatwave (observational data obtained

International Energy Agency EBC Annex 80-Resilient Cooling of Buildings-State of the Art Review

Authors

Peter Holzer,Philipp Stern,Ai Zhengtao,Jan Akander,Edward Arens,Taha Arghand,Shady Attia,Dragos-Ioan Bogatu,Emmanuel Bozonnet,Hilde Breesch,Mathias Cehlin,Giacomo Chiesa,Feryal Chtioui,Essam Elnagar,Abolfazl Hayati,Per Heiselberg,Saqib Javed,Ongun Kazanci,Maria Kolokotroni,Vincent Lemort,Ronnen Levinson,Ardeshir Mahdavi,Bjarne Olesen,Ramin Rahif,Patrick Salagnac,Agnese Salvati,Sana Sayadi,Stephen Selkowitz,Abantika Sengupta,Behzad Sodagar,Helene Teufl,Nari Yoon,Chen Zhang,Guoqiang Zhang,Hui Zhang,Michele Zinzi

Published Date

2022/4/30

The world is facing a rapid increase of air conditioning of buildings. It is the motivation of Annex 80 to develop, assess and communicate solutions of resilient cooling and overheating protection. Resilient Cooling is used to denote low energy and low carbon cooling solutions that strengthen the ability of individuals and our community to withstand, and prevent, thermal and other impacts of changes in global and local climates. It encompasses the assessment and Research & Development of both active and passive cooling technologies of the following four groups: a) Reduce heat loads to people and indoor environments. b) Remove sensible heat from indoor environments. c) Enhance personal comfort apart from space cooling. c) Remove latent heat from indoor environments. The present review sums up the state of the art in cooling solutions which may be regarded as resilient. Its main objective is to systematically describe the available cooling solutions, their physical basis, their benefits and limitations, their technology readiness level, their practical availability, and applicability. Doing so, the State-of-the-Art Review forms the basis for the work of EBC Annex 80.

Development in Sustainable Infrastructure—Influence of Sustainable Development Goals on the Redevelopment Planning for Industrial Townships in India

Authors

Abantika Sengupta,Parthiba Chakraborty

Published Date

2022/4/25

Envision 2030, the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) sets a plethora of agendas, which on being implemented envisions for a healthier, sustainable and more inclusive space for all. Redevelopment of Indian Industrial townships holds a great potential in implementing the SDGs into planning principle. Sustainable Development goal 3-Good Health and Well-being should be implemented as key objective while drafting the re-development plan of these townships. Health, well-being, infrastructure, access to clean energy, transport and safety of the residents along with providing them with state-of-the-art facilities should be the target. The first step for planning a redevelopment of an industrial township is to evaluate the existing scenario and plan the pivot  areas for redevelopment. Thus, focus of this study is data collection, data analysis and finally planning proposals in line with the SDGs. Additionally, Indian …

Evaluating thermal resilience to overheating in a Belgian apartment in shock scenarios

Authors

Hanne Vanwynsberghe,Abantika Sengupta,Hilde Breesch,Marijke Steeman

Published Date

2022/3/3

Building designs to be in line with energy efficient and carbon reduction goals, often focus on energy efficient techniques like high insulation, airtightness. However, these buildings are often subjected to overheating risks due to unforeseeable events like frequent heatwaves and power outages even in moderate climate zones like Belgium. Overheating risks in residential buildings have negative impact on the health of the building occupants (especially on the vulnerable occupants like elderly, infants and sick persons), causing sleep deprivation, heat stress and even mortality. In future climate scenarios, measures to reduce overheating risk in buildings while limiting the energy use of space cooling are gaining importance. This calls for a new design approach where thermal resilience (ability of the building and system to withstand shocks, adapt and maintain its normal function) is taken into account. The focus of this research is to evaluate existing resilience indicators (thermal autonomy, passive survivability, absorptive capacity, recovery capacities, etc.) for a typical Belgian apartment, by dynamic Building Energy Simulations (BES). A parametric study was conducted by implementing passive (night cooling) and active cooling technologies (air conditioning) and by changing building parameters (glazing ratio and shading) to check which building parameters and passive cooling strategies have the biggest impact on the overheating risk. Thermal resilience will be evaluated by subjecting the case study building to different shocks like heat waves (varying intensity, duration and severity) and power outages (varying duration and time of occurrence …

Evaluation of the spatial aspect of building resilience in classrooms equipped with displacement ventilation

Authors

Douaa Al-Assaad,Abantika Sengupta,Hilde Breesch

Journal

E3S Web of Conferences

Published Date

2022

Throughout their lifetime, buildings might face unpredictable shocks leading to fast deterioration of comfort levels. The ability of buildings and systems to absorb the shock and bring back the indoor conditions to their designed state is termed as “resilience”. Ventilation and thermal resilience have been studied under homogeneous conditions. However, the established airflow indoors and hence resilience is non-homogeneous. In this work, the spatial aspect of ventilation and thermal resilience will be assessed in a classroom equipped with displacement ventilation using 3D CFD modeling. Two sources of pollution were considered in the space: CO2 and VOCs. To study resilience, the numerical model was simulated until steady state. Subsequently, a power outage shock of 60 min was induced. The temporal and spatial mappings of temperature, and pollutants’ concentration were recorded in the occupied zone at …

Resilient cooling strategies–A critical review and qualitative assessment

Authors

Chen Zhang,Ongun Berk Kazanci,Ronnen Levinson,Per Heiselberg,Bjarne W Olesen,Giacomo Chiesa,Behzad Sodagar,Zhengtao Ai,Stephen Selkowitz,Michele Zinzi,Ardeshir Mahdavi,Helene Teufl,Maria Kolokotroni,Agnese Salvati,Emmanuel Bozonnet,Feryal Chtioui,Patrick Salagnac,Ramin Rahif,Shady Attia,Vincent Lemort,Essam Elnagar,Hilde Breesch,Abantika Sengupta,Liangzhu Leon Wang,Dahai Qi,Philipp Stern,Nari Yoon,Dragos-Ioan Bogatu,Ricardo Forgiarini Rupp,Taha Arghand,Saqib Javed,Jan Akander,Abolfazl Hayati,Mathias Cehlin,Sana Sayadi,Sadegh Forghani,Hui Zhang,Edward Arens,Guoqiang Zhang

Published Date

2021/11/15

The global effects of climate change will increase the frequency and intensity of extreme events such as heatwaves and power outages, which have consequences for buildings and their cooling systems. Buildings and their cooling systems should be designed and operated to be resilient under such events to protect occupants from potentially dangerous indoor thermal conditions.This study performed a critical review on the state-of-the-art of cooling strategies, with special attention to their performance under heatwaves and power outages. We proposed a definition of resilient cooling and described four criteria for resilience—absorptive capacity, adaptive capacity, restorative capacity, and recovery speed —and used them to qualitatively evaluate the resilience of each strategy.The literature review and qualitative analyses show that to attain resilient cooling, the four resilience criteria should be considered in the …

Conceptualising a resilient cooling system: A socio-technical approach

Authors

Wendy Miller,Anaïs Machard,Emmanuel Bozonnet,Nari Yoon,Dahai Qi,Chen Zhang,Aaron Liu,Abantika Sengupta,Jan Akander,Abolfazl Hayati,Mathias Cehlin,Ongun Berk Kazanci,Ronnen Levinson

Journal

City and Environment Interactions

Published Date

2021

Prolonged and/or extreme heat has become a natural hazard that presents a significant risk to humans and the buildings, technologies, and infrastructure on which they have previously relied on to provide cooling. This paper presents a conceptual model of a resilient cooling system centred on people, the socio-cultural-technical contexts they inhabit, and the risks posed by the temperature hazard. An integrative literature review process was used to undertake a critical and comprehensive evaluation of published research and grey literature with the objective of adding clarity and detail to the model. Two databases were used to identify risk management and natural hazard literature in multiple disciplines that represent subcomponents of community resilience (social, economic, institutional, infrastructure and environment systems). This review enabled us to characterise in more detail the nature of the temperature …

Assessment of thermal resilience of an office building in Belgium

Authors

Abantika Sengupta,Hilde Breesch,Marijke Steeman,Jonas Deleu,Lucidarme Brecht

Journal

Topical Issue (Part 1) IAQ 2020 conference

Published Date

2021/2/19

Overheating has become a recurring problem in airtight and highly insulated buildings even in moderate climates. This study aims to analyze thermal resilience in a case study office building by means of dynamic simulations. The goal is to assess the thermal comfort and thermal resilience during summer and mid-seasons. This office building without improvements has a ‘good’indoor climate for 79.6% of occupied hours. However, the dynamic simulations confirm the office building will suffer from overheating during summer with full occupancy, primarily in the afternoon of summer days (Temp> 16 C). In winter and midseason (Temp

Analysis and Mitigation Methods for Urban Heat Island Effect in an Urban Pocket in Delhi-NCR to generate Urban Resilience

Authors

Abantika Sengupta,Tiyasa Ray,Parthiba Chakrabarty,Unmesa Ray

Journal

Conference Proceeding of Second ASCE (American Society of Civil Engineers) India Conference

Published Date

2021

Infrastructures associated with built environment are constantly replacing the open spaces and green landscape. This is leading to Urban heat islands effects in the urban city centers, caused due to hardscapes and exhausted hot air from air conditioning systems, resulting in a higher temperature in the city centers than the surrounding suburb areas. The Delhi-NCR region in India is experiencing urban heat island, past the 1.5 degrees above the global average due to global warming and increased pollution. The adverse effects of global warming can be mitigated by utilization of resources aiming for a cooler and greener sustainable environment. This paper deals with the assessment of outdoor thermal comfort conditions in a residential dense urban fabric in Delhi, India. The results are obtained using analytical modelling and the effect of the outdoor thermal comfort influenced by the building façade, roof reflectivity and the generation of urban green pockets. It is imperative for a city to become resilient against climate change and foster urban sustainability. In this research, pockets of urban zones are investigated using IES-Virtual Environment and ENVI-met analytical tool to conduct a comparative study and analysis on the existing surface cover, building envelope and green coverage to identify the change in the surface operative temperature. Parameters such as surface reflectance index, the transmittance of solar gains and inclusion of urban vegetative zones investigate the change of the surface temperature influencing the thermal comfort and cooling energy needs in Delhi. The aim is to reduce the temperature by 1 to 2 degrees to create …

Analysis of resilience of ventilative cooling technologies in a case study building

Authors

Abantika Sengupta,Marijke Steeman,Hilde Breesch

Published Date

2020

Buildings globally are subjected to climate change and heatwaves, causing a risk of overheating and increasing energy use for cooling. Low- energy cooling solutions such as night cooling are promising to realize energy reduction and climate goals. Apart from energy performances, resilience is gaining importance in assessing the performance of the building and its systems. Resilience is defined as “an ability to withstand disruptions caused by extreme weather events, man-made disasters, power failure, change in use and atypical conditions; and to maintain capacity to adapt, learn and transform.” However, there is a clear lack of Resilience indicators specific for low energy cooling technologies. In this paper, the resilience of the night cooling in a residential building in Belgium is assessed for two external events: heat wave and shading failure. This paper shows the first attempt of a resilience indicator for night cooling as the effect on the shock of solar shading failure, heat wave or combination of both. It take 3.4 days to bring down the temperature below 25?, in case of shading failure and heatwaves compared to 9 hours in the reference case. Further research is needed to determine resilience indicators as a performance criteria of low-energy cooling systems.

See List of Professors in Abantika Sengupta University(Katholieke Universiteit Leuven)

Abantika Sengupta FAQs

What is Abantika Sengupta's h-index at Katholieke Universiteit Leuven?

The h-index of Abantika Sengupta has been 4 since 2020 and 4 in total.

What are Abantika Sengupta's top articles?

The articles with the titles of

Typical and extreme weather datasets for studying the resilience of buildings to climate change and heatwaves

Impact of heatwaves and system shocks on a nearly zero energy educational building: Is it resilient to overheating?

Resilient cooling in office buildings: case study in Belgium

Evaluation of thermal resilience to overheating for an educational building in future heatwave scenarios

Performance comparison of different ventilation strategies in elderly care homes in Belgium

A novel quantitative assessment framework of the IAQ resilience performance of buildings: The resilience score metric

Which design parameters impact the resilience to overheating in a typical apartment building?

International Energy Agency-Resilient Cooling of Buildings-State of the Art Review

...

are the top articles of Abantika Sengupta at Katholieke Universiteit Leuven.

What are Abantika Sengupta's research interests?

The research interests of Abantika Sengupta are: Building Physics, Building Energy Modelling, Facade design, Advanced Building Components, Sustainable Design

What is Abantika Sengupta's total number of citations?

Abantika Sengupta has 132 citations in total.

What are the co-authors of Abantika Sengupta?

The co-authors of Abantika Sengupta are Wendy Miller, Chen Zhang, Dahai Qi, Mathias Cehlin, Ongun Berk Kazanci, Jan Akander.

    Co-Authors

    H-index: 21
    Wendy Miller

    Wendy Miller

    Queensland University of Technology

    H-index: 19
    Chen Zhang

    Chen Zhang

    Aalborg Universitet

    H-index: 18
    Dahai Qi

    Dahai Qi

    Université de Sherbrooke

    H-index: 18
    Mathias Cehlin

    Mathias Cehlin

    Högskolan i Gävle

    H-index: 18
    Ongun Berk Kazanci

    Ongun Berk Kazanci

    Danmarks Tekniske Universitet

    H-index: 15
    Jan Akander

    Jan Akander

    Högskolan i Gävle

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