Aashna Sunderrajan

Aashna Sunderrajan

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

H-index: 6

North America-United States

About Aashna Sunderrajan

Aashna Sunderrajan, With an exceptional h-index of 6 and a recent h-index of 6 (since 2020), a distinguished researcher at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, specializes in the field of Social Psychology, Health Research, Medical Education.

His recent articles reflect a diverse array of research interests and contributions to the field:

Restoring trust in science and medicine: Empowering and educating future physicians in science communication with the public

Equipping Health Professions Educators to Better Address Medical Misinformation

Testing a digitally distributed method to recruit a network of community organizations to fight the consequences of the drug epidemic: A study in 13 American states

Complex solutions for a complex problem: A meta-analysis of the efficacy of multiple-behavior interventions on change in outcomes related to HIV.

Are actions better than inactions? Positivity, outcome, and intentionality biases in judgments of action and inaction

Naïve definitions of action and inaction: A study of free associations using natural language processing and top-down coding

The Associations of Religious Affiliation, Religious Service Attendance, and Religious Leader Norm With Support for Protective Versus Punitive Drug Policies: A Look at the …

More behavioral recommendations produce more change: A meta-analysis of efficacy of multibehavior recommendations to reduce nonmedical substance use.

Aashna Sunderrajan Information

University

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Position

___

Citations(all)

148

Citations(since 2020)

139

Cited By

55

hIndex(all)

6

hIndex(since 2020)

6

i10Index(all)

4

i10Index(since 2020)

4

Email

University Profile Page

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Aashna Sunderrajan Skills & Research Interests

Social Psychology

Health Research

Medical Education

Top articles of Aashna Sunderrajan

Restoring trust in science and medicine: Empowering and educating future physicians in science communication with the public

Authors

Vineet M Arora,V Ram Krishnamoorthi,Eve Bloomgarden,Shikha Jain,Aashna Sunderrajan,Naomi Tesema,Maeson Zietowski,Jeanne Farnan,Sara Serritella

Journal

Academic Medicine

Published Date

2023/6/1

While the traditional medical school curriculum specializes in teaching doctor–patient communication at the individual patient level, the need to train physicians to communicate science and medicine effectively to the public at large is, for the most part, ignored. With the unchecked proliferation of misinformation and disinformation during the COVID-19 pandemic, it is critical that current and future medical professionals learn to engage in the public arena using multiple methods (written, oral, social media) across multimedia platforms to dispel misinformation and accurately educate the public. This article describes the authors’ interdisciplinary approach at the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine to teaching science communication to medical students, early experiences, and future directions in this vein. The authors’ experiences show that medical students are viewed as trusted sources of health-related …

Equipping Health Professions Educators to Better Address Medical Misinformation

Authors

Brian G Southwell,Andrea Anderson,Anne Berry,Kamilah Weems,Lisa Howley

Published Date

2023/3/13

As part of a cooperative agreement with the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Federal Award Identification Number [FAIN]: NU50CK000586), the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) began a strategic initiative in 2022 both to increase confidence in COVID-19 vaccines and to address medical misinformation and mistrust through education in health professions contexts. Specifically, the AAMC solicited proposals for integrating competency-based, interprofessional strategies to mitigate health misinformation into new or existing curricula. Five Health Professions Education Curricular Innovations subgrantees received support from the AAMC in 2022 and reflected on the implementation of their ideas in a series of meetings over several months. Subgrantees included the Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, Florida International University Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at the University at Buffalo, the Maine Medical Center/Tufts University School of Medicine, and the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine. This paper comprises insights from each of the teams and overarching observations regarding the challenges and opportunities involved with leveraging health professions education to address medical misinformation and improve patient health.

Testing a digitally distributed method to recruit a network of community organizations to fight the consequences of the drug epidemic: A study in 13 American states

Authors

Haesung Jung,Aashna Sunderrajan,Marta Durantini,Edgardo Sanchez,Liliane Windsor,Man‐Pui Sally Chan,Thomas O'Brien,Bita Fayaz Farkhad,Alex Karan,Carol A Lee,Soonhyung Kwon,Dolores Albarracín

Journal

Journal of community psychology

Published Date

2022/9

To mitigate the opioid epidemic, a concerted effort to educate, prevent, diagnose, treat, and engage residents is required. In this study, a digitally distributed method to form a large network of organizations was tested with 99 counties in regions with high vulnerability to hepatitis C virus (HCV). The method involved a cascade of contacts going from email to phone calls, to videoconferencing and measuring the number of contacts required, amount of time taken, and the proportion of success at recruiting at least one community organization per county. A recruitment period of 5 months and 2118 contact attempts led to the recruitment of organizations from 73 out of our 99 target counties. Organizations belonging to health departments required more attempts and time to recruit but ultimately enrolled at higher rates than did other organizations such as coalitions and agencies. Organizations from counties more (vs. less …

Complex solutions for a complex problem: A meta-analysis of the efficacy of multiple-behavior interventions on change in outcomes related to HIV.

Authors

Aashna Sunderrajan,Benjamin White,Marta Durantini,Flor Sanchez,Laura Glasman,Dolores Albarracín

Journal

Health Psychology

Published Date

2021/9

Objective The purpose of this meta-analysis was to examine the success of multiple-behavior interventions and to identify whether the efficacy of such programs depends on the number of recommendations prescribed and the type of outcomes measured. Method We conducted a synthesis of 136 research reports (N= 59,330) using a robust variance estimate model (Tanner-Smith et al., 2016) to study change between baseline and the first follow-up across multiple-behavior interventions, single-behavior interventions, and passive controls. Results Multiple-behavior interventions were more efficacious than their single-behavior counterparts (multiple-behaviors: d=. 44 [95% confidence interval, CI [. 27,. 60]); single-behavior: d=. 21 [95% CI [. 00,. 43]), with efficacy varying based on the type of outcomes measured. Publication bias analysis revealed a small asymmetry but controlling for it did not eliminate these effects …

Are actions better than inactions? Positivity, outcome, and intentionality biases in judgments of action and inaction

Authors

Aashna Sunderrajan,Dolores Albarracín

Journal

Journal of Experimental Social Psychology

Published Date

2021/5/1

Behavior varies along a continuum of activity, with effortful behaviors characterizing actions and restful states characterizing inactions. Despite the adaptive value of both action and inaction, we propose three biases that, in the absence of other information, increase the probability that people like, and want to pursue, action more than inaction: An action positivity bias, an action outcome bias, and an action intentionality bias. Across four experiments, participants not only evaluated actions more favorably than inactions (Experiment 1–3) but also chose to engage in actions more than inactions (Experiment 4). This action positivity bias was driven by the two interrelated biases of outcome positivity and intentionality (Experiments 1–3), such that actions (versus inactions) were spontaneously thought of as having more positive outcomes and as being more intentional. Moreover, these outcome differences played a …

Naïve definitions of action and inaction: A study of free associations using natural language processing and top-down coding

Authors

Aashna Sunderrajan,Dolores Albarracín

Journal

Psicothema

Published Date

2021/2/1

Abstract ResumenBackground: Even though the terms “action” and “inaction” have been used to describe objects of attitudes, behaviors, and goals, the meaning of action and inaction for lay people has not been investigated. Method: In Study 1, participants were asked to spontaneously generate words and behaviors associated with action or inaction. In Studies 2 and 3, participants were presented with behaviors and asked to report whether each behavior involved agency, effort, and change. Results: Natural language processing of the responses from Study 1 revealed lay conceptualizations included topics related to occurrence, agency, effort, and change. In Studies 2 and 3, simple regressions showed agency, effort, and change correlated with judgments of action and inaction. However, once these predictors were simultaneously entered into a multiple regression, effort captured most of the variance. Conclusions: These findings suggest that, even though agency and change are important to the definition of action and inaction, effort is paramount.

The Associations of Religious Affiliation, Religious Service Attendance, and Religious Leader Norm With Support for Protective Versus Punitive Drug Policies: A Look at the …

Authors

Laura Conner Ghering,Lawson Koeppel,Lisa Moore,Lori Bumba,Lori Moore,Madeleine Furlow,Mandy Watson,Max Mohr,Megan Sills,Melissa Swisher,Michael Lovell,Michael Martin,Michael Railing,Michelle Matern,Sean Furlow Shrewsberry,Shawn Thorn,Sherrie Booker,Tina Ramirez Mackie,Tracy Aaron,Travis Rickford,Trish Burchette,Tyra Barrett,Vanessa Davis,Sally M-P Chan,Annie Jung,Bita Fayaz Farkhad,Liliane Windsor,Thomas O’Brien,Aashna Sunderrajan

Published Date

2021

Although anecdotal reports suggest that many religious communities in the United States oppose public health policies such as medication-assisted treatment and syringe services, the relation between religiosity and drug policy attitudes is currently unclear. A survey of support for protective and punitive drug policies was conducted with 3,096 residents from 14 Appalachian and midwestern states currently affected by the rural opioid epidemic. Despite the high prevalence of drug use in the sample, only 59% and 36% of the respondents, respectively, supported medication-assisted treatment and syringe exchange services, and 52% and 50%, respectively, supported punishment and incarceration for people who use drugs. Furthermore, although religious affiliation had no association with personal support for either protective or punitive drug policies, the frequency of religious service attendance was positively …

More behavioral recommendations produce more change: A meta-analysis of efficacy of multibehavior recommendations to reduce nonmedical substance use.

Authors

Wenhao Dai,Ryan Palmer,Aashna Sunderrajan,Marta Durantini,Flor Sánchez,Laura R Glasman,Fan Xuan Chen,Dolores Albarracín

Journal

Psychology of Addictive Behaviors

Published Date

2020/11

Death and morbidity associated with substance use have risen continuously over the last few decades, increasing the need for rigorous examination of promising programs. Interventions attempting to change multiple behaviors have been designed to address interconnected problems such as use of both alcohol and drugs. This meta-analysis aimed to examine the efficacy of multibehavior interventions to curb nonmedical substance use in relation to the theoretical relation among different substance use behaviors. Specifically, our synthesis aimed to estimate the optimal number of recommendations for intervention efficacy and evaluate the impact of different combinations of recommendations on intervention efficacy. A synthesis of multibehavior interventions addressing nonmedical substance use was conducted to measure behavioral changes between the pretest and the follow-up. These changes were then …

Mistaking an intention for a behavior: The case of enacting behavioral decisions versus simply intending to enact them

Authors

Dolores Albarracin,Aashna Sunderrajan,Kathleen C McCulloch,Christopher Jones

Journal

Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin

Published Date

2020/7/16

Five experiments investigated a previously unrecognized phenomenon—remembering that one enacted a mundane behavioral decision when one only intended to do so—and its psychological mechanisms. The theoretical conceptualization advanced in this research proposes that this error stems from a misattribution when an intention and a behavior are similar. Intentions and behaviors are similar when the physical aspects of the behavior resemble the intention (e.g., both require similar keystrokes) and when the behavior and the intention share mental contents (e.g., both rely on the same criterion). Experiments 1 and 2 introduced a paradigm with similar intentions and enactments and showed misreports and subsequent performance errors even when controlling for guessing. Experiments 3 and 4 demonstrated greater confusion when the physical involvement and mental criteria for intention and behavior were …

See List of Professors in Aashna Sunderrajan University(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

Aashna Sunderrajan FAQs

What is Aashna Sunderrajan's h-index at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign?

The h-index of Aashna Sunderrajan has been 6 since 2020 and 6 in total.

What are Aashna Sunderrajan's top articles?

The articles with the titles of

Restoring trust in science and medicine: Empowering and educating future physicians in science communication with the public

Equipping Health Professions Educators to Better Address Medical Misinformation

Testing a digitally distributed method to recruit a network of community organizations to fight the consequences of the drug epidemic: A study in 13 American states

Complex solutions for a complex problem: A meta-analysis of the efficacy of multiple-behavior interventions on change in outcomes related to HIV.

Are actions better than inactions? Positivity, outcome, and intentionality biases in judgments of action and inaction

Naïve definitions of action and inaction: A study of free associations using natural language processing and top-down coding

The Associations of Religious Affiliation, Religious Service Attendance, and Religious Leader Norm With Support for Protective Versus Punitive Drug Policies: A Look at the …

More behavioral recommendations produce more change: A meta-analysis of efficacy of multibehavior recommendations to reduce nonmedical substance use.

...

are the top articles of Aashna Sunderrajan at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

What are Aashna Sunderrajan's research interests?

The research interests of Aashna Sunderrajan are: Social Psychology, Health Research, Medical Education

What is Aashna Sunderrajan's total number of citations?

Aashna Sunderrajan has 148 citations in total.

What are the co-authors of Aashna Sunderrajan?

The co-authors of Aashna Sunderrajan are Norbert Schwarz, Dolores Albarracin, FLOR SANCHEZ, Liliane Windsor, Kathleen Cameron McCulloch, David J Hauser.

    Co-Authors

    H-index: 152
    Norbert Schwarz

    Norbert Schwarz

    University of Southern California

    H-index: 61
    Dolores Albarracin

    Dolores Albarracin

    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    H-index: 25
    FLOR SANCHEZ

    FLOR SANCHEZ

    Universidad Autónoma de Madrid

    H-index: 21
    Liliane Windsor

    Liliane Windsor

    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    H-index: 18
    Kathleen Cameron McCulloch

    Kathleen Cameron McCulloch

    Portland State University

    H-index: 15
    David J Hauser

    David J Hauser

    Queen's University

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