Aaron Yelowitz

Aaron Yelowitz

University of Kentucky

H-index: 29

North America-United States

About Aaron Yelowitz

Aaron Yelowitz, With an exceptional h-index of 29 and a recent h-index of 21 (since 2020), a distinguished researcher at University of Kentucky, specializes in the field of COVID19, Medicaid, Racial Disparities, Real Estate Economics, Bitcoin.

His recent articles reflect a diverse array of research interests and contributions to the field:

Adverse selection in the group life insurance market

Should We Trust Consumers or Bureaucrats with Health Insurance Choices?

Predictive scheduling laws do not promote full-time work

Aaron Yelowitz testifies at the hearing,“Improper Payments and Government Waste,” hosted by the Pennsylvania House of Representatives

The impact of real estate agent specialization and activity level on market outcomes

School reopenings, mobility, and COVID-19 spread: evidence from Texas

Did COVID‐19 change life insurance offerings?

The Affordable Care Act’s coverage impacts in the Trump era

Aaron Yelowitz Information

University

University of Kentucky

Position

Department of Economics

Citations(all)

5012

Citations(since 2020)

2868

Cited By

3320

hIndex(all)

29

hIndex(since 2020)

21

i10Index(all)

49

i10Index(since 2020)

35

Email

University Profile Page

University of Kentucky

Aaron Yelowitz Skills & Research Interests

COVID19

Medicaid

Racial Disparities

Real Estate Economics

Bitcoin

Top articles of Aaron Yelowitz

Adverse selection in the group life insurance market

Authors

Timothy F Harris,Aaron Yelowitz,Jeffery Talbert,Alison Davis

Journal

Economic Inquiry

Published Date

2023/10

The employer‐sponsored life insurance (ESLI) market is susceptible to adverse selection due to community‐rated premiums, guaranteed issue coverage, and the existence of an individual market. Using payroll and healthcare claims data from a large university, we find that employees with worse health are more likely to elect coverage causing adverse selection in supplemental ESLI. Nonetheless, we find employees typically do not increase coverage following a severe illness even when they can without providing evidence of insurability. Furthermore, demand estimation shows employees are not price‐sensitive and estimated increases in premiums from adverse selection are unlikely to cause significant welfare loss.

Should We Trust Consumers or Bureaucrats with Health Insurance Choices?

Authors

Aaron Yelowitz

Published Date

2023/8/9

Health insurance is a complicated financial product and there is convincing evidence that some consumers make mistakes in their insurance choices, both in public programs like Medicare and Medicaid and in private settings like employer-provided health insurance. Proposals to nudge consumers—especially by changing default enrollment choices—has real potential to do harm, in part because those doing the nudging may have their own agendas or lack the competence or the relevant information to give good advice. Although some proposals may guide consumers toward better choices, allowing consumers to learn from mistakes and quickly correct them—through more frequent open enrollment periods—would provide a more durable and less invasive solution.

Predictive scheduling laws do not promote full-time work

Authors

Aaron Yelowitz

Journal

Institute for the Study of Free Enterprise Working Paper

Published Date

2022/1

To date, most of the analysis of scheduling laws has been prospective or experimental. Yelowitz and Corder (2016) find that there were few part-time workers in San Francisco who were working that schedule involuntarily (just one in seven) and most were working part time voluntarily. A key premise in San Francisco’s law is that part-time workers were plagued by insufficient hours, and a critical, untested assumption is that work scheduling laws would fix that problem. The same study–surveying 52 employers–found that one key response to such laws would be scheduling fewer employees per shift. The same motivations were found in Washington, DC’s attempted legislation where advocates argued the law was necessary to promote full time work, stating that workers “struggle with low wages, too few hours, and fluctuating hours.”(Corder and Yelowitz, 2016). In Washington, DC, half of the 100 employers surveyed stated that they would schedule fewer employees per shift. In a recent field experiment, Mas and Pallais (2017) find that workers are willing to give up 20 percent of wages

Aaron Yelowitz testifies at the hearing,“Improper Payments and Government Waste,” hosted by the Pennsylvania House of Representatives

Authors

Aaron Yelowitz

Published Date

2022/10/26

This is a report published by Cato Institute in October 2022. It was written by Aaron Yelowitz.

The impact of real estate agent specialization and activity level on market outcomes

Authors

Jason Beck,Frank Scott,Aaron Yelowitz

Journal

Journal of Housing Research

Published Date

2022/10/4

Real estate agents play a critical role in reducing transaction costs in home sales. The incentives they face and the effect they have on selling price and time on market have been shown to differ depending on the legal setting governing the contractual relationship between principal (home owner) and agent. Using 8 years of Multiple Listing Service (MLS) data from a large Midwestern city, we study a market where the large majority of transactions involve a listing agent working directly with the seller and a cooperating agent working directly with the buyer. We find that more active agents sell homes more quickly, but at a lower price. Important differences emerge when we separate agents’ roles into listing agents and selling agents. We find that recent market activity by listing agents leads to significantly lower sales prices and a quicker sale. An additional listing in the previous 60 days is associated with a 0.3 …

School reopenings, mobility, and COVID-19 spread: evidence from Texas

Authors

Charles J Courtemanche,Anh H Le,Aaron Yelowitz,Ron Zimmer

Published Date

2021/5/10

This paper examines the effect of fall 2020 school reopenings in Texas on county-level COVID-19 cases and fatalities. Previous evidence suggests that schools can be reopened safely if community spread is low and public health guidelines are followed. However, in Texas, reopenings often occurred alongside high community spread and at near capacity, making it difficult to meet social distancing recommendations. Using event-study models and handcollected instruction modality and start dates for all school districts, we find robust evidence that reopening Texas schools gradually but substantially accelerated the community spread of COVID-19. Results from our preferred specification imply that school reopenings led to at least 43,000 additional COVID-19 cases and 800 additional fatalities within the first two months. We then use SafeGraph mobility data to provide evidence that spillovers to adults’ behaviors contributed to these large effects. Median time spent outside the home on a typical weekday increased substantially in neighborhoods with large numbers of school-age children, suggesting a return to in-person work or increased outside-of-home leisure activities among parents.

Did COVID‐19 change life insurance offerings?

Authors

Timothy F Harris,Aaron Yelowitz,Charles Courtemanche

Journal

Journal of Risk and Insurance

Published Date

2021/12

The profitability of life insurance offerings is contingent on accurate projections and pricing of mortality risk. The COVID‐19 pandemic created significant uncertainty, with dire mortality predictions from early forecasts resulting in widespread government intervention and greater individual precaution that reduced the projected death toll. We analyze how life insurance companies changed pricing and offerings in response to COVID‐19 using monthly data on term life insurance policies from Compulife. We estimate event‐study models that exploit well‐established variation in the COVID‐19 mortality rate based on age and underlying health status. Despite the increase in mortality risk and significant uncertainty, the results generally indicate that life insurance companies did not increase premiums or decrease policy offerings due to COVID‐19. Nonetheless, we find some evidence that premiums differentially increased …

The Affordable Care Act’s coverage impacts in the Trump era

Authors

Charles Courtemanche,Ishtiaque Fazlul,James Marton,Benjamin Ukert,Aaron Yelowitz,Daniela Zapata

Journal

INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing

Published Date

2021/10/7

The 2016 US presidential election created uncertainty about the future of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and led to postponed implementation of certain provisions, reduced funding for outreach, and the removal of the individual mandate tax penalty. In this article, we estimate how the causal impact of the ACA on insurance coverage changed during 2017 through 2019, the first 3 years of the Trump administration, compared to 2016. Data come from the 2011–2019 waves of the American Community Survey (ACS), with the sample restricted to non-elderly adults. Our model leverages variation in treatment intensity from state Medicaid expansion decisions and pre-ACA uninsured rates. We find that the coverage gains from the components of the law that took effect nationally—such as the individual mandate and regulations and subsidies in the private non-group market—fell from 5 percentage points in 2016 to 3.6 …

Chance elections, social distancing restrictions, and KENTUCKY’s early COVID-19 experience

Authors

Charles Courtemanche,Joseph Garuccio,Anh Le,Joshua Pinkston,Aaron Yelowitz

Journal

Plos one

Published Date

2021/7/1

Early in the pandemic, slowing the spread of novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) relied on non-pharmaceutical interventions. All U.S. states adopted social-distancing restrictions in March and April of 2020, though policies varied both in timing and scope. Compared to states with Democratic governors, those with Republican governors often adopted measures for shorter durations and with greater resistance from their residents. In Kentucky, an extremely close gubernatorial election immediately prior to the discovery of SARS-CoV-2 replaced a Republican incumbent with a Democrat, despite Republicans easily winning all other statewide races. This chance election result offers a unique opportunity to examine the impact of early social distancing policies in a relatively conservative, rural, white-working-class state. Our study begins by estimating an event-study model to link adoption of several common social distancing measures–public school closures, bans on large gatherings, closures of entertainment-related businesses such as restaurants, and shelter-in-place orders (SIPOs)–to the growth rate of cases across counties in the Midwest and South in the early stages of the pandemic. These policies combined to slow the daily growth rate of COVID-19 cases by 9 percentage points after 16 days, with SIPOs and entertainment establishment closures accounting for the entire effect. In order to obtain results with more direct applicability to Kentucky, we then estimate a model that interacts the policy variables with a “white working class” index characterized by political conservatism, rurality, and high percentages of white, evangelical Christian …

Targeting intensive job assistance to ex‐offenders by the nature of offense: Results from a randomized control trial

Authors

Christopher R Bollinger,Aaron Yelowitz

Journal

Economic Inquiry

Published Date

2021/7

As many as two‐thirds of newly‐released inmates will be arrested for a new offense within 3 years. This study evaluates the impact of job assistance on recidivism rates among ex‐offenders. The job assistance program, run though the private company America Works, uses a network of employers to place clients. Ex‐offenders were randomly assigned to intensive job assistance (treatment group) or the standard program (control group). The intensive program is meant to improve average work readiness for ex‐offenders. It reduces the likelihood of subsequent arrest among nonviolent ex‐offenders, but has little effect on violent ex‐offenders. The rearrest rate for nonviolent ex‐offenders in the treatment group was 19 percentage points lower than those in the control group. The rearrest rate for violent ex‐offenders in the treatment group was indistinguishable from those in the control group. We estimate benefits from …

The full impact of the Affordable Care Act on political participation

Authors

Charles Courtemanche,James Marton,Aaron Yelowitz

Journal

RSF: The Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences

Published Date

2020/7/1

This article examines the impact of both the Medicaid expansion and the private insurance-related components of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) on voter turnout and registration. We employ a difference-in-difference-in-differences identification strategy exploiting variation over time, state Medicaid expansion status, and within-state local area pre-ACA uninsured rates. Using data between 2006 and 2016 from the November Current Population Survey and the Census Bureau’s Small Area Health Insurance Estimates, our results suggest little effect of the ACA on voter turnout or registration.

Strong Social Distancing Measures In The United States Reduced The COVID-19 Growth Rate

Authors

Charles Courtemanche,Joseph Garuccio,Anh Le,Joshua Pinkston,Aaron Yelowitz

Journal

Health Affairs

Published Date

2020/7/1

State and local governments imposed social distancing measures in March and April 2020 to contain the spread of the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19). These measures included bans on large social gatherings; school closures; closures of entertainment venues, gyms, bars, and restaurant dining areas; and shelter-in-place orders. We evaluated the impact of these measures on the growth rate of confirmed COVID-19 cases across US counties between March 1, 2020, and April 27, 2020. An event study design allowed each policy’s impact on COVID-19 case growth to evolve over time. Adoption of government-imposed social distancing measures reduced the daily growth rate of confirmed COVID-19 cases by 5.4 percentage points after one to five days, 6.8 percentage points after six to ten days, 8.2 percentage points after eleven to fifteen days, and 9.1 percentage points after sixteen to twenty days. Holding …

Racial and Ethnic Disparities in COVID-19: Evidence from Six Large Cities

Authors

Joseph Benitez,Charles Courtemanche,Aaron Yelowitz

Journal

Journal of Economics, Race, and Policy

Published Date

2020/12

As of June 2020, the coronavirus pandemic has led to more than 2.3 million confirmed infections and 121 thousand fatalities in the USA, with starkly different incidence by race and ethnicity. Our study examines racial and ethnic disparities in confirmed COVID-19 cases across six diverse cities—Atlanta, Baltimore, Chicago, New York City, San Diego, and St. Louis—at the ZIP code level (covering 436 “neighborhoods” with a population of 17.7 million). Our analysis links these outcomes to six separate data sources to control for demographics; housing; socioeconomic status; occupation; transportation modes; health care access; long-run opportunity, as measured by income mobility and incarceration rates; human mobility; and underlying population health. We find that the proportions of Black and Hispanic residents in a ZIP code are both positively and statistically significantly associated with COVID-19 cases …

Longer‐​ Run Impacts from Outrageous Policing Incidents

Authors

Aaron Yelowitz

Published Date

2020/6/1

The past few weeks have seen broad‐​based community outrage from extremely disturbing incidents involving current or former police officers in the killing of 44‐​year‐​old George Floyd in Minneapolis, 26‐​year‐​old Breonna Taylor in Louisville, and 25‐​year‐​old Ahmaud Arbery near Brunswick, Georgia. In all cases, the victims were African‐​American and the events have spotlighted the role of racism in policing. In the immediate aftermath—which exploded during the week of May 25th—there were both peaceful and violent protests, destruction of private and public property, and additional injury in Minneapolis, Louisville, Atlanta, and far beyond. There is no question that the short‐​run costs to each city and its residents will be enormous. Poor underlying race relations between the police and community has long‐​term costs, too, an issue that I explored with my colleague Tim Harris in a study published …

The Impact of the Affordable Care Act on Health Care Access and Self‐Assessed Health in the Trump Era (2017‐2018)

Authors

Megan McHugh,Jillian Harvey,Jaime Hamil,Nina I Verevkina,Jeffrey Alexander,Dennis P Scanlon

Journal

Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety

Published Date

2016/3/1

* The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation funded this manuscript as part of the AF4Q evaluation, but Foundation representatives did not participate in its drafting, nor has any version of it been provided to them before publication. At the start of each interview, respondents were told that their comments would remain confidential, would not be shared with the Foundation, and would not influence the support provided by the Foundation. However, when the manuscript was being prepared, quotations were included with the respondents’ permission.

The Impact of the ACA on Insurance Coverage Disparities after Four Years

Authors

Charles J Courtemanche,Ishtiaque Fazlul,James Marton,Benjamin D Ukert,Aaron Yelowitz,Daniela Zapata

Published Date

2019/8/19

The purpose of this paper is to estimate the impact of the major components of the ACA (Medicaid expansion, subsidized Marketplace plans, and insurance market reforms) on disparities in insurance coverage after four years. We use data from the 2011–2017 waves of the American Community Survey (ACS), with the sample restricted to nonelderly adults. Our methods feature a difference-in-difference-in-differences model, developed in the recent ACA literature, which separately identifies the effects of the nationwide and Medicaid expansion portions of the law. The differences in this model come from time, state Medicaid expansion status, and local area pre-ACA uninsured rate. We stratify our sample separately by income, race/ethnicity, marital status, age, gender, and geography in order to examine access disparities. After four years, we find that the fully implemented ACA eliminated 44 percent of the coverage gap across income groups, with the Medicaid expansion accounting for this entire reduction. The ACA also reduced coverage disparities across racial groups by 26.7 percent, across marital status by 45 percent, and across age groups by 44 percent, with these changes being partly attributable to both the Medicaid expansion and nationwide components of the law.

Medicaid Coverage Across the Income Distribution under the Affordable Care Act

Authors

Charles J Courtemanche,James Marton,Aaron Yelowitz

Published Date

2020/8

This paper examines trends in Medicaid enrollment across the income distribution after the ACA’s Medicaid expansion. Using data from the American Community Survey between 2012 and 2017, we compare Medicaid coverage over time in 9 states that expanded Medicaid in 2014 with no previous expansion for able-bodied, working-age adults with 12 states that had not expanded Medicaid by 2019 and also had no previous expansion for such adults. A difference-indifferences model is used to formalize this comparison. Similar to many previous studies, we find that Medicaid coverage increased dramatically for income-eligible adults under 138% of the federal poverty level (FPL). In addition, we show that Medicaid participation increased by 3.0 percentage points for those with incomes above 138% of the FPL from a pre-ACA baseline of 2.7% among this group. While we cannot say with certainty why these individuals were able to participate in Medicaid, we offer several potential explanations that should be the subject of future work. For example, it is possible that the ACA Medicaid expansions were administered differently at the state or local level than federal rules would require, similarly to differences between effective tax rates and statutory tax rates in many transfer programs.

See List of Professors in Aaron Yelowitz University(University of Kentucky)

Aaron Yelowitz FAQs

What is Aaron Yelowitz's h-index at University of Kentucky?

The h-index of Aaron Yelowitz has been 21 since 2020 and 29 in total.

What are Aaron Yelowitz's top articles?

The articles with the titles of

Adverse selection in the group life insurance market

Should We Trust Consumers or Bureaucrats with Health Insurance Choices?

Predictive scheduling laws do not promote full-time work

Aaron Yelowitz testifies at the hearing,“Improper Payments and Government Waste,” hosted by the Pennsylvania House of Representatives

The impact of real estate agent specialization and activity level on market outcomes

School reopenings, mobility, and COVID-19 spread: evidence from Texas

Did COVID‐19 change life insurance offerings?

The Affordable Care Act’s coverage impacts in the Trump era

...

are the top articles of Aaron Yelowitz at University of Kentucky.

What are Aaron Yelowitz's research interests?

The research interests of Aaron Yelowitz are: COVID19, Medicaid, Racial Disparities, Real Estate Economics, Bitcoin

What is Aaron Yelowitz's total number of citations?

Aaron Yelowitz has 5,012 citations in total.

What are the co-authors of Aaron Yelowitz?

The co-authors of Aaron Yelowitz are Jonathan Gruber, Ron Zimmer, Kenneth Troske, Charles Courtemanche, Jeffery Talbert, Christopher Bollinger.

    Co-Authors

    H-index: 102
    Jonathan Gruber

    Jonathan Gruber

    Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    H-index: 45
    Ron Zimmer

    Ron Zimmer

    University of Kentucky

    H-index: 34
    Kenneth Troske

    Kenneth Troske

    University of Kentucky

    H-index: 34
    Charles Courtemanche

    Charles Courtemanche

    University of Kentucky

    H-index: 34
    Jeffery Talbert

    Jeffery Talbert

    University of Kentucky

    H-index: 23
    Christopher Bollinger

    Christopher Bollinger

    University of Kentucky

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