Aaron Weinberg

Aaron Weinberg

Case Western Reserve University

H-index: 44

North America-United States

About Aaron Weinberg

Aaron Weinberg, With an exceptional h-index of 44 and a recent h-index of 29 (since 2020), a distinguished researcher at Case Western Reserve University, specializes in the field of oral cancer, innate immunity, oral microbiome, covid-19.

His recent articles reflect a diverse array of research interests and contributions to the field:

Beta-defensin index: A functional biomarker for oral cancer detection

Impact of Molnupiravir Treatment on Patient-Reported COVID-19 Symptoms in the Phase 3 MOVe-OUT Trial: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial

Association of dietary nitrate and a Mediterranean diet with age-related macular degeneration among US adults: The Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) and AREDS2

Long-term outcomes of adding lutein/zeaxanthin and ω-3 fatty acids to the AREDS supplements on age-related macular degeneration progression: AREDS2 report 28

HBD-2 binds SARS-CoV-2 RBD and blocks viral entry: Strategy to combat COVID-19

Human β-Defensin-3 is Associated With Platelet-Derived Extracellular Vesicles and is a Potential Contributor to Endothelial Dysfunction

The role of dectin-1 signaling in altering tumor immune microenvironment in the context of aging

Epithelial cancer evaluation using beta defensin

Aaron Weinberg Information

University

Case Western Reserve University

Position

___

Citations(all)

9440

Citations(since 2020)

2819

Cited By

7242

hIndex(all)

44

hIndex(since 2020)

29

i10Index(all)

98

i10Index(since 2020)

68

Email

University Profile Page

Case Western Reserve University

Aaron Weinberg Skills & Research Interests

oral cancer

innate immunity

oral microbiome

covid-19

Top articles of Aaron Weinberg

Beta-defensin index: A functional biomarker for oral cancer detection

Authors

Santosh K Ghosh,Yuncheng Man,Arwa Fraiwan,Christopher Waters,Crist McKenzie,Cheng Lu,David Pfau,Hameem Kawsar,Natarajan Bhaskaran,Pushpa Pandiyan,Ge Jin,Farren Briggs,Chad C Zender,Rod Rezaee,Fotinos Panagakos,Jason E Thuener,Jay Wasman,Alice Tang,Hiba Qari,Trisha Wise-Draper,Thomas S McCormick,Anant Madabhushi,Umut A Gurkan,Aaron Weinberg

Journal

Cell Reports Medicine

Published Date

2024/3/19

There is an unmet clinical need for a non-invasive and cost-effective test for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) that informs clinicians when a biopsy is warranted. Human beta-defensin 3 (hBD-3), an epithelial cell-derived anti-microbial peptide, is pro-tumorigenic and overexpressed in early-stage OSCC compared to hBD-2. We validate this expression dichotomy in carcinoma in situ and OSCC lesions using immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. The proportion of hBD-3/hBD-2 levels in non-invasively collected lesional cells compared to contralateral normal cells, obtained by ELISA, generates the beta-defensin index (BDI). Proof-of-principle and blinded discovery studies demonstrate that BDI discriminates OSCC from benign lesions. A multi-center validation study shows sensitivity and specificity values of 98.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] 90.3–99.9) and 82.6% (95% CI 68.6–92.2 …

Impact of Molnupiravir Treatment on Patient-Reported COVID-19 Symptoms in the Phase 3 MOVe-OUT Trial: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial

Authors

Yanfen Guan,Amy Puenpatom,Matthew G Johnson,Ying Zhang,Yujie Zhao,Joseph Surber,Aaron Weinberg,Carlos Brotons,Roman Kozlov,Rudy Lopez,Kathleen Coetzee,Joel Santiaguel,Jiejun Du,Angela Williams-Diaz,Michelle Brown,Amanda Paschke,Carisa De Anda,Josephine M Norquist

Journal

Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published Date

2023/12/1

Background Molnupiravir is an orally administered antiviral authorized for COVID-19 treatment in adults at high risk of progression to severe disease. Here, we report secondary and post hoc analyses of participants’ self-reported symptoms in the MOVe-OUT trial, which evaluated molnupiravir initiated within 5 days of symptom onset in nonhospitalized, unvaccinated adults with mild-to-moderate, laboratory-confirmed COVID-19. Methods Eligible participants completed a 15-item symptom diary daily from day 1 (randomization) through day 29, rating symptom severity as “none,” “mild,” “moderate,” or “severe”; loss of smell and loss of taste were rated as “yes” or “no.” Time to sustained symptom resolution/improvement was defined as the number of days from randomization to the first of 3 consecutive days of reduced severity, without subsequent relapse. Time to symptom …

Association of dietary nitrate and a Mediterranean diet with age-related macular degeneration among US adults: The Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) and AREDS2

Authors

Geoffrey K Broadhead,Elvira Agrón,David Peprah,Tiarnan DL Keenan,Thomas P Lawler,Julie Mares,Emily Y Chew,JP SanGiovanni,FL Ferris,R Danis,B Blodi,Y Ruby,A Antoszyk,M Klein,I Kim,GE Fish,WT Wong,DH Orth,K Rezaei,SB Bressler,GB Hubbard,MJ Elman,S Chandra,T Friberg,M Tolentino,D Le,M Lansing,J Stallman,PA Edwards,C Baker,MA Novak,RD Isernhagen,TE Schneiderman,L Halperin,M Lee,D Boyer,P Rosenfeld,P Rath,M Levy,RH Rosa,J Hoskins,CK Chandra,DM Brown,C Greven,JM Jumper,L Marguilies,WT Rosenthal,R Rosen,G Stoller,FL El Baba,WC McLean,R Kingsley,A Lyon,J Heier,A Fung,I Scott,J Wells,M Banach,P Beer,J Folk,J Maguire,S Sadda,R Garfinkel,JE Kim,P Berstein,M Rauser,RA Lewis,BC Fishburne,S Huang,NR Sabates,N Kim,R Frank,B Joondeph,O Houghton,D Hainsworth,E Chaum,R Millay,R Iezzi,R Apte,R Adelman,A Agrawal,N Bhagat,L Ulanski,S Schwartz,C Owsley,A Letson,YG HE,C Toth,L Morse,M Cooney,S Grover,H Ferreyra,A Brucker,D DiLoreto,A Weinberg,AREDS/AREDS2 Investigators

Journal

JAMA ophthalmology

Published Date

2023/2/1

ImportanceLow dietary nitrate intake has previously been suggested to be a risk factor for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) progression; however, this finding has not been replicated in other cohorts or adjusted for dietary patterns.ObjectiveTo determine whether there is an association between dietary nitrate intake and AMD progression.Design, Setting, and ParticipantsThis cohort study analyzed data from the prospective Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) and AREDS2 randomized clinical trial cohorts and their extended follow-up studies, which were conducted in multicenter outpatient retinal practices. Participants in both trials had non–late AMD in at least 1 eye. Data were analyzed from March 1, 2020, to September 30, 2022.ExposureDietary nitrate intake.Main Outcomes and MeasuresAssociation between dietary nitrate intake and development of late AMD (neovascular AMD [nAMD] or …

Long-term outcomes of adding lutein/zeaxanthin and ω-3 fatty acids to the AREDS supplements on age-related macular degeneration progression: AREDS2 report 28

Authors

Emily Y Chew,Traci E Clemons,Elvira Agrón,Amitha Domalpally,Tiarnán DL Keenan,Susan Vitale,Claire Weber,Douglas C Smith,William Christen,John Paul SanGiovanni,Federick L Ferris,Ronald P Danis,Barbara A Blodi,Alan J Ruby,Andrew Antoszyk,Michael Klein,Ivana Kim,Gary Edd Fish,Wai T Wong,David H Orth,Kourous Rezaei,Susan B Bressler,G Baker Hubbard,Michael J Elman,Suresh Chandra,Thomas Friberg,Michael Tolentino,Darmakusuma Le,Mary B Lansing,Jay B Stallman,Paul A Edwards,Carl W Baker,Michael A Novak,Ricky D Isernhagen,Todd E Schneiderman,Lawrence Halperin,Michael Lee,David Boyer,Philip Rosenfeld,Pamela Rath,Marc Levy,Robert H Rosa,John Hoskins,Clement K Chan,David M Brown,Craig Greven,J Michael Jumper,Linda Margulies,William Rosenthal,Richard Rosen,Glenn Stoller,Fadi El Baba,W Copley McLean,Ronald Kingsley,Alice Lyon,Jeffrey Heier,Anne Fung,Ingrid Scott,John Wells,Michael Banach,Paul Beer,James Folk,Joseph Maguire,SriniVas Sadda,Richard Garfinkel,Judy E Kim,Paul Berstein,Michael Rauser,Richard Alan Lewis,Barron C Fishburne,Suber Huang,Nelson R Sabates,Nicola Kim,Robert N Frank,Brian Joondeph,Odette Houghton,Dean Hainsworth,Edward Chaum,Robert Millay,Raymond Iezzi,Rajendra Apte,Ron Adelman,Anita Agrawal,Neelakshi Bhagat,Lawrence Ulanski,Steven Schwartz,Cynthia Owsley,Alan J Letson,HE Yu-Guang,Cynthia Toth,Lawrence Morse,Michael Cooney,Sandeep Grover,Henry Ferreyra,Alexander J Brucker,David DiLoreto,Aaron Weinberg,AREDS2 Research Group

Journal

JAMA ophthalmology

Published Date

2022/7/1

ImportanceAfter the Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 (AREDS2) study, the beta carotene component was replaced by lutein/zeaxanthin for the development of the revised AREDS supplement. However, it is unknown if the increased risk of lung cancer observed in those assigned beta carotene persists beyond the conclusion of the AREDS2 trial and if there is a benefit of adding lutein/zeaxanthin to the original AREDS supplement that can be observed with long-term follow-up.ObjectiveTo assess 10-year risk of developing lung cancer and late age-related macular degeneration (AMD).Design, Setting, and ParticipantsThis was a multicenter epidemiologic follow-up study of the AREDS2 clinical trial, conducted from December 1, 2012, to December 31, 2018. Included in the analysis were participants with bilateral or unilateral intermediate AMD for an additional 5 years after clinical trial. Eyes/participants were …

HBD-2 binds SARS-CoV-2 RBD and blocks viral entry: Strategy to combat COVID-19

Authors

Liqun Zhang,Santosh K Ghosh,Shrikanth C Basavarajappa,Yinghua Chen,Pravesh Shrestha,Jackson Penfield,Ann Brewer,Parameswaran Ramakrishnan,Matthias Buck,Aaron Weinberg

Journal

Iscience

Published Date

2022/3/18

New approaches to complement vaccination are needed to combat the spread of SARS-CoV-2 and stop COVID-19-related deaths and medical complications. Human beta defensin 2 (hBD-2) is a naturally occurring epithelial cell-derived host defense peptide that has anti-viral properties. Our comprehensive in-silico studies demonstrate that hBD-2 binds the site on the CoV-2-RBD that docks with the ACE2 receptor. Biophysical measurements confirm that hBD-2 indeed binds to the CoV-2-receptor-binding domain (RBD) (KD ∼ 2μM by surface plasmon resonance), preventing it from binding to ACE2-expressing cells. Importantly, hBD-2 shows specificity by blocking CoV-2/spike pseudoviral infection, but not VSVG-mediated infection, of ACE2-expressing human cells with an IC50 of 2.8 ± 0.4 μM. These promising findings offer opportunities to develop hBD-2 and/or its derivatives and mimetics to safely and effectively …

Human β-Defensin-3 is Associated With Platelet-Derived Extracellular Vesicles and is a Potential Contributor to Endothelial Dysfunction

Authors

Soumya Panigrahi,Santosh K Ghosh,Brian Ferrari,Jonathan M Wyrick,Eugene A Podrez,Aaron Weinberg,Scott F Sieg

Journal

Frontiers in Molecular Biosciences

Published Date

2022/3/9

While platelets are the essential mediators of hemostasis, they are being increasingly recognized for their potential to contribute to host defenses. Here, using immunofluorescent microscopy, western blot, and ELISA, we found that human β-defensin 3 (hBD-3), an important antimicrobial peptide produced by epithelial cells, can be detected in human platelets and megakaryocytes. Flow cytometry and immuno-electron microscopy revealed hBD-3 on the surface of thrombin-activated platelets. Moreover, hBD-3 was also found in platelet-derived exosomes (p-EVs), isolated from platelet-poor plasma and from platelet supernatants following thrombin stimulation. Incubation of platelets with hBD-3 peptide resulted in modest platelet activation and pre-incubation of platelets with synthetic hBD-3 prior to exposure to thrombin appeared to increase hBD-3 content in platelet lysates as well as in p-EVs, suggesting that hBD-3 can be initially taken up by platelets, perhaps via their open canalicular system. Interestingly, in vitro exposure of primary human endothelial cells to either hBD-3 peptide or purified p-EVs, caused significant endothelial dysfunction as documented by diminished levels of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), Krüppel like factor-2 (KLF-2), and elevated relative expression of von Willebrand Factor (vWF). Pre-incubation of platelets with hBD-3 appeared to augment endothelial dysfunction caused by p-EVs. Overall, the current study provides evidence that hBD-3 enriched exosomes can be released by activated platelets and may play a role in positive feedback of platelet activation as well as in endothelial dysfunction. Theoretically, these …

The role of dectin-1 signaling in altering tumor immune microenvironment in the context of aging

Authors

Natarajan Bhaskaran,Sangeetha Jayaraman,Cheriese Quigley,Prerna Mamileti,Mahmoud Ghannoum,Aaron Weinberg,Jason Thuener,Quintin Pan,Pushpa Pandiyan

Journal

Frontiers in Oncology

Published Date

2021/4/22

An increased accumulation of immune-dysfunction-associated CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) is observed in aging oral mucosa during infection. Here we studied the function of Tregs during oral cancer development in aging mucosa. First, we found heightened proportions of Tregs and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) accumulating in mouse and human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) tissues. Using the mouse 4-Nitroquinoline 1-oxide(4-NQO) oral carcinogenesis model, we found that tongues of aged mice displayed increased propensity for epithelial cell dysplasia, hyperplasia, and accelerated OSCC development, which coincided with significantly increased abundance of IL-1β, Tregs, and MDSC in tongues. Partial depletion of Tregs reduced tumor burden. Moreover, fungal abundance and dectin-1 signaling were elevated in aged mice suggesting a potential role for dectin-1 in modulating immune environment and tumor development. Confirming this tenet, dectin-1 deficient mice showed diminished IL-1β, reduced infiltration of Tregs and MDSC in the tongues, as well as slower progression and reduced severity of tumor burden. Taken together, these data identify an important role of dectin-1 signaling in establishing the intra-tumoral immunosuppressive milieu and promoting OSCC tumorigenesis in the context of aging.

Epithelial cancer evaluation using beta defensin

Published Date

2021/3/25

A method of detecting epithelial cancer is described that includes the steps of:(a) determining the level of beta defensin 3 (BD-3) and beta defensin 2 (BD-2) in a suspect sample obtained from a subject;(b) comparing the level of BD-3 to BD-2 determined in the suspect sample to obtain a suspect BD-3/BD-2 ratio,(c) comparing the suspect BD-3/BD-2 ratio to a healthy BD-3/BD-2 ratio to obtain a diagnostic BD-3/BD-2 ratio; and (d) characterizing the subject as having epithelial cancer if the diagnostic BD-3/BD-2 ratio is greater than 1. A microfluidic device for detecting epithelial cancer using the diagnostic BD-3/BD-2 ratio is also described.

Molecular dynamics simulations and functional studies reveal that hBD-2 binds SARS-CoV-2 spike RBD and blocks viral entry into ACE2 expressing cells

Authors

Liqun Zhang,Santosh K Ghosh,Shrikanth C Basavarajappa,Jeannine Muller-Greven,Jackson Penfield,Ann Brewer,Parameswaran Ramakrishnan,Matthias Buck,Aaron Weinberg

Journal

BioRxiv

Published Date

2021/1/7

New approaches to complement vaccination are needed to combat the spread of SARS-CoV-2 and stop COVID-19 related deaths and long-term medical complications. Human beta defensin 2 (hBD-2) is a naturally occurring epithelial cell derived host defense peptide that has antiviral properties. Our comprehensive in-silico studies demonstrate that hBD-2 binds the site on the CoV-2-RBD that docks with the ACE2 receptor. Biophysical and biochemical assays confirm that hBD-2 indeed binds to the CoV-2-receptor binding domain (RBD)(K D~ 300 nM), preventing it from binding to ACE2 expressing cells. Importantly, hBD-2 shows specificity by blocking CoV-2/spike pseudoviral infection, but not VSV-G mediated infection, of ACE2 expressing human cells with an IC 50 of 2.4±0.1 μM. These promising findings offer opportunities to develop hBD-2 and/or its derivatives and mimetics to safely and effectively use as …

Stable Interaction Of The UK B. 1.1. 7 lineage SARS-CoV-2 S1 Spike N501Y Mutant With ACE2 Revealed By Molecular Dynamics Simulation (preprint)

Authors

Wesam Ahmed,Angelin M Phillip,Kabir H Biswas,Xintian Xu,Lina Song,Simo Kitanovski,Jun Wang,Matthias Buck,Aaron Weinberg,Chun-Che Liao,Yen-Hui Chen,Jia-Tsrong Jan,Cheng-Pu Sun,Yin-Shiou Lin,Ping-Yi Wu,Yu-Chiuan Wang,Mi-Hua Tao,Yi-Ling Lin

Published Date

2021

COVID-19 caused by SARS-CoV-2 has caused a massive health crisis across the world, and genetic variants such as the D614G gaining enhanced infectivity and competitive fitness have significantly aggravated the global concern. In this regard, the latest SARS-CoV-2 variant, B. 1.1. 7 lineage, reported from the United Kingdom (UK) is of great significance, in that it contains several mutations that increases its infection and transmission rates as evidenced by the increased number of clinical reports. Specifically, the N501Y mutation in the SARS-CoV-2 S1 receptor binding domain (RBD) domain has been shown to possess increased affinity for ACE2, although the basis for this not yet clear. Here, we dissect the mechanism underlying the increased affinity using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the available ACE2-S1-RBD complex structure (6M0J) and show a prolonged and stable interaction of the Y501 residue in the N501Y mutant S1-RBD with interfacial residues, Y41 and K353, in ACE2 as compared to the wild type S1-RBD. Additionally, we find that the N501Y mutant S1-RBD displays altered dynamics that likely aids in its enhanced interaction with ACE2. By elucidating a mechanistic basis for the increased affinity of the N501Y mutation in S1-RBD for ACE2, we believe that the results presented here will aid in developing therapeutic strategies against SARS-CoV-2 including designing drugs targeting the ACE2-S1-RBD interaction.

STEM-20. THE ROLE OF HUMAN BETA DEFENSINS IN THE CLONOGENICITY OF GLIOBLASTOMA MULTIFORME

Authors

Peggy Harris,Amber Kerstetter-Fogle,Anthony Sloan,Alankrita Raghavan,Harry Hoffman,Jill Barnholtz-Sloan,Marta Couce,Ge Jin,Aaron Weinberg,Andrew Sloan

Journal

Neuro-Oncology

Published Date

2021/11/2

BACKGROUND Evidence suggests treatment resistant glioma stem cells (GSCs) drive glioblastoma (GBM) recurrence. Current treatments fail to eradicate GSC and novel GSC targeting therapies are a priority. GSC exhibit elevated DNA replication stress (RS) versus non GSC tumour cells driving constitutive DNA damage response (DDR) activation and efficient DNA repair. We previously demonstrated that targeting RS response with combined ATR and PARP inhibition (CAiPi) (VE821 and Olaparib) provides potent GSC specific cytotoxicity. In this study we investigated the underlying DDR phenotype which determines this vulnerability. RESULTS Paired GSC enriched (‘GSC’) and GSC depleted, differentiated (‘bulk’) populations were cultured from GBM specimens in neurobasal media with growth factors or serum containing media respectively. GSC exhibited reduced survival following exposure to CAiPi versus …

Ramping up antimicrobial peptides against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2

Authors

Santosh K Ghosh,Aaron Weinberg

Journal

Frontiers in Molecular Biosciences

Published Date

2021

Human-derived antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), such as defensins and cathelicidin LL-37, are members of the innate immune system and play a crucial role in early pulmonary defense against viruses. These AMPs achieve viral inhibition through a variety of mechanisms including, but not limited to, direct binding to virions, binding to and modulating host cell-surface receptors, blocking viral replication, and aggregation of viral particles and indirectly by functioning as chemokines to enhance or curb adaptive immune responses. Given the fact that we are in a pandemic of unprecedented severity and the urgent need for therapeutic options to combat severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), naturally expressed AMPs and their derivatives have the potential to combat coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and impede viral infectivity in various ways. Provided the fact that development of effective treatments is an urgent public health priority, AMPs and their derivatives are being explored as potential prophylactic and therapeutic candidates. Additionally, cell-based platforms such as human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) therapy are showing success in saving the lives of severely ill patients infected with SARS-CoV-2. This could be partially due to AMPs released from hMSCs that also act as immunological rheostats to modulate the host inflammatory response. This review highlights the utilization of AMPs in strategies that could be implemented as novel therapeutics, either alone or in combination with other platforms, to treat CoV-2–infected individuals.

IL-1β-MyD88-mTOR Axis Promotes Immune-Protective IL-17A+Foxp3+ Cells During Mucosal Infection and Is Dysregulated With Aging

Authors

Natarajan Bhaskaran,Fady Faddoul,Andre Paes da Silva,Sangeetha Jayaraman,Elizabeth Schneider,Prerna Mamileti,Aaron Weinberg,Pushpa Pandiyan

Journal

Frontiers in Immunology

Published Date

2020/11/6

CD4+Foxp3+Tregs maintain immune homeostasis, but distinct mechanisms underlying their functional heterogeneity during infections are driven by specific cytokine milieu. Here we show that MyD88 deletion in Foxp3+ cells altered their function and resulted in increased fungal burden and immunopathology during oral Candida albicans (CA) challenge. Excessive inflammation due to the absence of MyD88 in Tregs coincided with a reduction of the unique population of IL-17A expressing Foxp3+ cells (Treg17) and an increase in dysfunctional IFN-γ+/Foxp3+ cells (TregIFN-γ) in infected mice. Failure of MyD88-/- Tregs to regulate effector CD4+ T cell functions correlated with heightened levels of IFN-γ in CD4+ T cells, as well as increased infiltration of inflammatory monocytes and neutrophils in oral mucosa in vivo. Mechanistically, IL-1β/MyD88 signaling was required for the activation of IRAK-4, Akt, and mTOR, which led to the induction and proliferation of Treg17 cells. In the absence of IL-1 receptor signaling, Treg17 cells were reduced, but IL-6-driven expansion of TregIFN-γ cells was increased. This mechanism was physiologically relevant during Candida infection in aged mice, as they exhibited IL-1 receptor/MyD88 defect in Foxp3+ cells, loss of p-mTORhighTreg17 cells and reduced levels of IL-1β in oral mucosa, which coincided with persistent tongue inflammation. Concurrent with Treg dysfunction, aging was associated with increased CD4+ T cell hyperactivation and heightened levels of IL-6 in mice and humans in oral mucosa in vivo. Taken together, our data identify IL-1β/MyD88/Treg axis as a new component that modulates …

Innate immune mechanisms to oral pathogens in oral mucosa of HIV‐infected individuals

Authors

Aaron Weinberg,Sharof Tugizov,Pushpa Pandiyan,Ge Jin,Srabanti Rakshit,Annapurna Vyakarnam,Julian R Naglik

Published Date

2020/9

A crucial aspect of mucosal HIV transmission is the interaction between HIV, the local environmental milieu and immune cells. The oral mucosa comprises many host cell types including epithelial cells, CD4 + T cells, dendritic cells and monocytes/macrophages, as well as a diverse microbiome predominantly comprising bacterial species. While the oral epithelium is one of the first sites exposed to HIV through oral‐genital contact and nursing infants, it is largely thought to be resistant to HIV transmission via mechanisms that are still unclear. HIV‐1 infection is also associated with predisposition to secondary infections, such as tuberculosis, and other diseases including cancer. This review addresses the following questions that were discussed at the 8th World Workshop on Oral Health and Disease in AIDS held in Bali, Indonesia, 13 September —15 September 2019: (a) How does HIV infection affect epithelial cell …

Correction for Ye et al.,“Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Induces Rapid Release of Angiopoietin-2 from Endothelial Cells”

Authors

Feng-Chun Ye,Fu-Chun Zhou,Stanley Nithianantham,Bala Chandran,Xiao-Lan Yu,Aaron Weinberg,Shou-Jiang Gao

Journal

Journal of Virology

Published Date

2020/7/1

Volume 87, no. 11, p. 6326–6335, 2013, https://doi. org/10.1128/JVI. 03303-12. Page 6332, Fig. 4: Ang-2 protein bands shown in Fig. 4A were inadvertently duplicated in Fig. 4C. We have corrected this error.

Abstract A33: Fungal beta-glucans, EphA2, and oral cancer: Preliminary observations

Authors

Sara Maskal,Santosh Ghosh,Chad Zender,Jason Thuener,Aaron Weinberg

Published Date

2020/6/15

Introduction: Although Candida spp. are associated with invasive candidiasis in immunocompromised hosts, rates of asymptomatic colonization with the fungus are high. Candida has been associated with a variety of cancers and is thought to play a role in carcinogenesis. Beta glucans are polysaccharide components of the fungal cell wall that are more highly expressed in the more invasive, hyphal form of Candida. Recent data suggests that EPHA2, a tyrosine kinase receptor on oral epithelial cells, acts as a pattern recognition receptor for beta-glucans. We tested the hypothesis that beta-glucans promote proliferation and/or migration of squamous cell carcinoma cells through interactions with EPHA2.Methods: W18 cells, with wild-type EPHA2 expression, were derived from murine squamous cell carcinoma cells induced by classical DMBA/TPA protocol. SCC-728 is a squamous cell carcinoma cell line from an …

Role of FAD-I in fusobacterial interspecies interaction and biofilm formation

Authors

Bhumika Shokeen,Jane Park,Emily Duong,Sonam Rambhia,Manash Paul,Aaron Weinberg,Wenyuan Shi,Renate Lux

Journal

Microorganisms

Published Date

2020/1/2

RadD, a major adhesin of oral fusobacteria, is part of a four-gene operon encoding the small lipoprotein FAD-I and two currently uncharacterized small proteins encoded by the rapA and rapB genes. Previously, we described a role for FAD-I in the induction of human B-defensin 2 (hBD2) upon contact with oral epithelial cells. Here, we investigated potential roles for fad-I, rapA, and rapB in interspecies interaction and biofilm formation. Gene inactivation mutants were generated for each of these genes in the nucleatum and polymorphum subspecies of Fusobacterium nucleatum and characterized for their adherence to partner species, biofilm formation, and operon transcription. Binding to Streptococcus gordonii was increased in all mutant strains with Δfad-I having the most significant effect. This increased adherence was directly proportional to elevated radD transcript levels and resulted in significantly different architecture and height of the biofilms formed by Δfad-I and S. gordonii compared to the wild-type parent. In conclusion, FAD-I is important for fusobacterial interspecies interaction as its lack leads to increased production of the RadD adhesin suggesting a role of FAD-I in its regulation. This regulatory effect does not require the presence of functional RadD.

Correction: Shokeen, B., et al. Role of FAD-I in Fusobacterial Interspecies Interaction and Biofilm Formation. Microorganisms 2020, 8, 70

Authors

Bhumika Shokeen,Jane Park,Emily Duong,Sonam Rambhia,Manash Paul,Aaron Weinberg,Wenyuan Shi,Renate Lux

Journal

Microorganisms

Published Date

2020/12/29

Background:Open Access CorrectionCorrection: Shokeen, B., et al. Role of FAD-I in Fusobacterial Interspecies Interaction and Biofilm Formation. Microorganisms 2020, 8, 70

See List of Professors in Aaron Weinberg University(Case Western Reserve University)

Aaron Weinberg FAQs

What is Aaron Weinberg's h-index at Case Western Reserve University?

The h-index of Aaron Weinberg has been 29 since 2020 and 44 in total.

What are Aaron Weinberg's top articles?

The articles with the titles of

Beta-defensin index: A functional biomarker for oral cancer detection

Impact of Molnupiravir Treatment on Patient-Reported COVID-19 Symptoms in the Phase 3 MOVe-OUT Trial: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial

Association of dietary nitrate and a Mediterranean diet with age-related macular degeneration among US adults: The Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) and AREDS2

Long-term outcomes of adding lutein/zeaxanthin and ω-3 fatty acids to the AREDS supplements on age-related macular degeneration progression: AREDS2 report 28

HBD-2 binds SARS-CoV-2 RBD and blocks viral entry: Strategy to combat COVID-19

Human β-Defensin-3 is Associated With Platelet-Derived Extracellular Vesicles and is a Potential Contributor to Endothelial Dysfunction

The role of dectin-1 signaling in altering tumor immune microenvironment in the context of aging

Epithelial cancer evaluation using beta defensin

...

are the top articles of Aaron Weinberg at Case Western Reserve University.

What are Aaron Weinberg's research interests?

The research interests of Aaron Weinberg are: oral cancer, innate immunity, oral microbiome, covid-19

What is Aaron Weinberg's total number of citations?

Aaron Weinberg has 9,440 citations in total.

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