Aaron Breneman

Aaron Breneman

University of Minnesota-Twin Cities

H-index: 30

North America-United States

About Aaron Breneman

Aaron Breneman, With an exceptional h-index of 30 and a recent h-index of 24 (since 2020), a distinguished researcher at University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, specializes in the field of Space Plasma Physics.

His recent articles reflect a diverse array of research interests and contributions to the field:

Chapman conference: Particle Precipitation: Drivers, Properties, and Impacts on Atmosphere, Ionosphere, Magnetosphere (AIM) Coupling–Feb 2025 at RMIT in Melbourne, AU

A New Four‐Component L*‐Dependent Model for Radial Diffusion Based on Solar Wind and Magnetospheric Drivers of ULF Waves

Earth's magnetosphere dynamics during" forced breathing" due to solar wind periodic density structures

Observation of an Electron Microburst With an Inverse Time‐Of‐Flight Energy Dispersion

Using multipoint observations to quantify microburst precipitation caused by whistler mode chorus waves

Understanding the properties, wave drivers, and impacts of electron microburst precipitation: current understanding and critical knowledge gaps

Atmospheric and ionospheric impacts of energetic particle precipitation (EPP) from Earth's ring current and radiation belts

Cross-scale physics and the acceleration of particles in collisionless plasmas throughout the Heliosphere and beyond: III. Radiation belts

Aaron Breneman Information

University

University of Minnesota-Twin Cities

Position

Research Scientist School of Physics and Astronomy

Citations(all)

2591

Citations(since 2020)

1805

Cited By

1460

hIndex(all)

30

hIndex(since 2020)

24

i10Index(all)

47

i10Index(since 2020)

43

Email

University Profile Page

University of Minnesota-Twin Cities

Aaron Breneman Skills & Research Interests

Space Plasma Physics

Top articles of Aaron Breneman

Chapman conference: Particle Precipitation: Drivers, Properties, and Impacts on Atmosphere, Ionosphere, Magnetosphere (AIM) Coupling–Feb 2025 at RMIT in Melbourne, AU

Authors

Aaron Breneman,Alexa Halford,Kyle Murphy,Hilde Nesse,Brett Carter,Lauren Blum,Adam Kellerman,Sadie Elliott,Sam Walton

Published Date

2024/3/7

Energetic particle precipitation (EPP) is one of the fundamental drivers of space weather in the coupled atmosphere-ionosphere-magnetosphere (AIM) system. These electrons and ions from the sun or the terrestrial magnetosphere, ranging in energy from hundreds of eV to GeV, precipitate into the atmosphere in response to enhanced topside (solar and magnetosphere) driving. They deposit their energy at a wide range of altitudes, enhancing ionization, and changing neutral temperature, density, and winds. During times of prolonged driving the resulting changes can adversely affect anthropogenic systems including disruption of communication and power systems, and increased satellite drag leading to orbital decay. In addition to its effects on space weather, EPP has been recognized as an important component of climate via its ability to indirectly destroy ozone, modifying local radiative balance in the middle and …

A New Four‐Component L*‐Dependent Model for Radial Diffusion Based on Solar Wind and Magnetospheric Drivers of ULF Waves

Authors

Kyle R Murphy,Jasmine Sandhu,I Jonathan Rae,Thomas Daggitt,Sarah Glauert,Richard B Horne,Clare EJ Watt,Sarah Bentley,Adam Kellerman,Louis Ozeke,Alexa J Halford,Sheng Tian,Aaron Breneman,Leonid Olifer,Ian R Mann,Vassilis Angelopoulos,John Wygant

Journal

Space Weather

Published Date

2023/7

Waves which couple to energetic electrons are particularly important in space weather, as they drive rapid changes in the topology and intensity of Earth's outer radiation belt during geomagnetic storms. This includes Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) waves that interact with electrons via radial diffusion which can lead to electron dropouts via outward transport and rapid electron acceleration via inward transport. In radiation belt simulations, the strength of this interaction is specified by ULF wave radial diffusion coefficients. In this paper we detail the development of new models of electric and magnetic radial diffusion coefficients derived from in‐situ observations of the azimuthal electric field and compressional magnetic field. The new models use as it accounts for adiabatic changes due to the dynamic magnetic field coupled with an optimized set of four components of solar wind and geomagnetic activity, , , , and , as …

Earth's magnetosphere dynamics during" forced breathing" due to solar wind periodic density structures

Authors

Simone Di Matteo,Larry Kepko,Nicholeen Viall,Aaron Breneman,Alexa Halford,Umberto Villante

Journal

EGU General Assembly Conference Abstracts

Published Date

2023/5

In the solar wind density, we often observe periodic fluctuations on time scales ranging from a few minutes to a few hours which we refer to as Periodic Density Structures (PDSs). The PDSs belong to the class of" meso-scale structures" with radial length scales greater than or equal to the size of the Earth's dayside magnetosphere. The periodic character of these transients (≈ 0.2-4.0 mHz) can determine periodic compressional fluctuations of the Earth's magnetic field at similar frequencies (" forced breathing" mode). The corresponding time scales overlap with the frequency range of Pc5 Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) waves (≈ 1.7-6.7 mHz). The compressional" forced breathing" fluctuations are often global and impact the entire Earth's magnetosphere system/dynamics. Using a recently developed spectral analysis approach applied to magnetic field observations at satellites and ground stations, we were able to …

Observation of an Electron Microburst With an Inverse Time‐Of‐Flight Energy Dispersion

Authors

Mykhaylo Shumko,Yoshizumi Miyoshi,Lauren W Blum,Alexa J Halford,AW Breneman,AT Johnson,JG Sample,DM Klumpar,Harlan E Spence

Journal

Geophysical Research Letters

Published Date

2023/8/16

Interactions between whistler mode chorus waves and electrons are a dominant mechanism for particle acceleration and loss in the outer radiation belt. One form of this loss is electron microburst precipitation: a sub‐second intense burst of electrons. Despite previous investigations, details regarding the microburst‐chorus scattering mechanism—such as dominant resonance harmonic—are largely unconstrained. One way to observationally probe this is via the time‐of‐flight energy dispersion. If a single cyclotron resonance is dominant, then higher energy electrons will resonate at higher magnetic latitudes: sometimes resulting in an inverse time‐of‐flight dispersion with lower‐energy electrons leading. Here we present a clear example of this phenomena, observed by a FIREBIRD‐II CubeSat on 27 August 2015, that shows good agreement with the Miyoshi‐Saito time‐of‐flight model. When constrained by this …

Using multipoint observations to quantify microburst precipitation caused by whistler mode chorus waves

Authors

Sadie Elliott,Aaron Breneman,Chris Colpitts,Pettit Joshua,Cynthia Cattell,Alexa Halford,Mykhaylo Shumko,John Sample,Arlo Johnson,Yoshi Miyoshi,Yoshi Kasahara,Christopher Cully,Satoko Nakamura,Takefumi Mitani,Tomo Hori,Iku Shinohara,Kazuo Shiokawa,Shoya Matsuda,Martin Connors,Mitsunori Ozaki,Jyrki Manninen

Published Date

2023

Microbursts are impulsive injections of energetic (few keV to MeV) electrons into the atmosphere, primarily caused by nonlinear scattering by whistler mode chorus waves. While the relative importance of microburst precipitation as a loss process has not been fully quantified, many studies have shown microbursts may be a major loss source for outer radiation belt electrons. Conjunction observations between the FIREBIRD II CubeSats and Van Allen Probes (RBSP) from 2015–2019 have presented the opportunity to quantify the importance of microburst precipitation. We utilize this conjunction dataset, along with additional observations of chorus and microburst precipitation, when available, to constrain the size of the microburst-producing chorus region. We will present statistical results for the upper and lower bounds on the size of the region. Additionally, we will discuss wave properties, including amplitude, wave …

Understanding the properties, wave drivers, and impacts of electron microburst precipitation: current understanding and critical knowledge gaps

Authors

Sadie Elliott,Allison Jaynes,Jacob Bortnik,Aaron Breneman,Christopher Colpitts,Alexa Halford,Mykhaylo Shumko,Lauren Blum,Lunjin Chen,Ashley Greeley

Journal

Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society

Published Date

2023/7

Understanding and quantifying the underlying causes and consequences plus relative importance of microburst precipitation represent outstanding questions in radiation belt physics. Important questions remain about the nature of the resonance generating the microbursts and the overall importance of the precipitation.

Atmospheric and ionospheric impacts of energetic particle precipitation (EPP) from Earth's ring current and radiation belts

Authors

Drew L Turner,Vassilis Angelopoulos,Daniel Baker,Grant Berland,J Bernard Blake,Lauren Blum,Jacob Bortnik,Katrina Bossert,Aaron Breneman,George Clark,Seth Claudepierre,Ian J Cohen,Sasha Drozdov,Scot Elkington,Xiaohua Fang,Joe Fennell,Bruce Fritz,Ashley Greeley,Brian Harding,Lynn Harvey,Richard Horne,Mary Hudson,Adam Kellerman,Peter Kollmann,Wen Li,Xinlin Li,Bob Marshall,Yoshi Miyoshi,Cora Randall,Geoff Reeves,Jean-Francois Ripoll,Craig Rodger,Andrei Runov,Theodore Sarris,Mykhaylo Shumko,Kareem Sorathia,Ethan Tsai,Weichao Tu,Sasha Ukhorskiy,Maria Usanova,Pekka Verronen,Colin Wilkins,Xiao-Jia Zhang

Journal

Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society

Published Date

2023/7

Explore and establish the consequences of and causal role between energetic particle precipitation (ie, ring current, radiation belt, and solar energetic particles) and: i) transient events of mesospheric NOx and HOx production, ozone depletion, and stratospheric and tropospheric warming and ii) localized, transient structures and sporadic intensification of the D-and E-region ionospheres.

Cross-scale physics and the acceleration of particles in collisionless plasmas throughout the Heliosphere and beyond: III. Radiation belts

Authors

Drew L Turner,Lynn B Wilson III,Katy Goodrich,Ian J Cohen,Terry Z Liu,Steven J Schwartz,Damiano Caprioli,Colby Haggerty,Imogen Gingell,Matt Hill,Elena Provornikova,Parisa Mostafavi,Peter Kollmann,Pontus Brandt,Ralph McNutt,Benoit Lavraud

Journal

Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society

Published Date

2023/7

Shocks in astrophysical plasmas are considered responsible for accelerating many of the most energetic particles that we observe in the Universe, including galactic and anomalous cosmic rays (GCRs and ACRs) and solar energetic particles (SEPs). Particle acceleration at shocks can occur through a number of different mechanisms, including diffusive shock acceleration, shockdrift acceleration, wave-particle interactions, and acceleration related to magnetic reconnection and turbulence. In this paper, we present the following suggestions for consideration by the Decadal Survey Committee and Panels: i) The physics of collisionless shocks and particle acceleration at collisionless shocks should be highlighted as areas of particular interest for future Heliophysics research. ii) A mission should be dedicated to studying Earth’s bow shock and interplanetary shocks around 1 AU–the most readily accessible collisionless shocks for exploration and discovery–for example see the Multi-point Assessment of the Kinematics of Shocks–MAKOS mission. iii) Whenever possible, dedicated or mission-of-opportunity payloads should be included on Heliophysics and Planetary missions that allow for observations of collisionless shocks throughout the heliosphere. In particular, as one example, we should ensure that sufficient instrumentation is included on the Uranus Orbiter and Probe (highlighted in the Planetary Decadal Survey) mission to ensure detailed observations of the unique, high Mach number bow shock at the Uranian system. iv) An Interstellar Probe mission could provide new, critical observations to address what is the nature and multiscale physics …

BARREL Observations of Electron Precipitation Driven by Solar Wind Periodic Density Structures

Authors

Simone Di Matteo,Aaron Breneman,Nicholeen Viall,Larry Kepko,Alexa Halford

Journal

Third Triennial Earth-Sun Summit (TESS)

Published Date

2022/10

The Balloon Array for Radiation belt Relativistic Electron Losses (BARREL) mission was designed to study the loss of radiation belt electrons to the upper atmosphere. Measurements of losses are in the form of bremsstrahlung X-rays generated from the collision of electrons with the Earth's atmosphere. Analysis of data from balloon pairs showed that electron precipitation events manifest coherence on long time scales, on the order of≈ 60 minutes, and large-scale size, encompassing mostly the near noon local times. These events are frequently unrelated to internal magnetospheric activity, suggesting that the loss mechanism is related to the changes in solar wind driving involving modulation of the magnetospheric cavity size (forced breathing) and/or triggering of Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) waves. In fact, these magnetospheric field fluctuations can determine electron loss directly, via loss cone modulation, or …

Radio waves and whistler-mode waves in solar wind and their interactions with energetic electrons

Authors

Cynthia Cattell,Aaron Breneman,Lindsay Glesener,Ben Leiran,Ben Short,Juan Carlos Martinez Oliveros,Jasper Halekas,Parker Solar Probe FIELDS TEAM,Parker Solar Probe SWEAP Team

Journal

Authorea Preprints

Published Date

2022/11/28

The role of waves in the propagation, scattering and energization of electrons in the solar wind has long been a topic of interest. Conversely, understanding the excitation of waves by energetic electrons can provide us with a diagnostic for the processes that accelerate the electrons. We will discuss two different processes: (1) the interaction of narrowband whistler-mode waves with solar wind electrons, and (2) how periodic Type III radio bursts yield clues to small-scale acceleration of energetic electrons in the solar corona. Waveform captures in the solar wind at 1 AU obtained by the STEREO revealed the existence of narrowband large amplitude whistler mode waves, propagating at highly oblique angles to the magnetic field. Similar waves are less commonly seen inside .2 AU by Parker Solar Probe. The differences provide clues for understanding electron propagation, scattering and energization. Type III radio bursts have long been used as remote probes of electron acceleration in the solar corona. The occurrence of periodic behavior in Type III bursts observed by Parker Solar Probe, Wind and STEREO when there are no observable flares provides a unique opportunity to diagnose small-scale acceleration of electrons in the corona. Periodicities of ~ 5 minutes in the Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) Extreme Ultraviolet data in several areas of an active region are well correlated with the repetition rate of the Type III radio bursts. Similar periods occur in the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI )data. These results provide evidence for acceleration by wave-modulated reconnection or small-scale size waves …

Statistical Size of the Microburst-Producing Chorus Source Determined From FIREBIRD II and Van Allen Probes Conjunctions

Authors

Aaron W Breneman,Sadie Elliott,Chris A Colpitts,Mykhaylo Shumko,Arlo Johnson,John Glen Sample

Journal

Fall Meeting 2022

Published Date

2022/12/13

Microbursts are impulsive scatterings of electrons from the outer radiation belt into the atmosphere, primarily caused by nonlinear scattering by chorus waves. Various attempts have been made to quantify their contribution to outer belt electron loss. However, uncertainty in the overall size and duration of the microburst region is typically large, meaning that estimates for the time for microbursts to deplete the outer belt of electrons range from significant (few hrs) to not very important (many days). The dataset of conjunctions between the FIREBIRD II CubeSats and Van Allen Probes from 2015-2019 can be used to address this question statistically. By analyzing conjunction events that contain high time resolution microburst and VLF wave burst data, we find significant correlations between chorus and microburst amplitudes for separations up to 2 hrs MLT and 1 L-shell from the field line of the conjunction. This can be …

Recommendations on Funding Mission Operations and Historical Datasets

Authors

Mykhaylo Shumko,Alexa Halford,Aaron Breneman,David M Klumpar,Marc Lessard,Vassilis Angelopoulos,Robert Marshall,Arlo Johnson,Xinlin Li,Brian Walsh,Lauren Blum

Published Date

2022/9/8

The Heliophysics Low Cost Access to Space (H-LCAS) and Flight Opportunities in Research and Technology (H-FORT) grant budgets primarily fund the development and construction of instrumentation. A side effect of this approach is that mission operations, including data collection and data processing, tend to be severely under budget (or unfunded). In order to satisfy the requirements of modern missions, we recommend a new funding source for mission operations. This funding source is increasingly vital going forward as new missions collect exponentially more data compared to past missions. Similarly, to take full advantage of underutilized historical datasets, we recommend adding another funding source to analyze these valuable datasets. Without these funding sources, mission datasets will, in the best case, be significantly underdeveloped and underutilized, and more likely, will fall dramatically short of their required scope.

Detection of Hertz Frequency Multi-Harmonic Field Lines Resonances at Low-L (L∼ 1.2) during Van Allen Probe Perigee Passes

Authors

Francesco Rossi Lena,Louis Godwin Ozeke,John Wygant,Sheng Tian,Aaron Breneman,Ian Mann

Journal

Authorea Preprints

Published Date

2022/11/24

We present new and previously unreported in-situ observations of Hertz frequency multi-harmonic mode field line resonances detected by the Electric Field and Waves (EFW) instrument on-board the NASA Van Allen Probes during low-L perigee passes. Spectral analysis of the spin plane electric field data reveals the waves in numerous perigee passes, in sequential passes of Probes A and B, and with harmonic frequency structures from ~0.5 to 3.5 Hz which vary with L-shell, altitude, and from day to day. Comparing the observations to wave models using plasma mass density values along the field line given by empirical power laws and from the International Reference Ionosphere model (IRI), we conclude the waves are standing Alfvén field line resonances, and that only odd-mode harmonics are excited. The model eigenfrequencies are strongly controlled by the density close to the apex of the field line, suggesting a new diagnostic for equatorial ionospheric density dynamics.

How Low Can They Go? Investigating the Impact of ULF Waves on Lower-Energy Electrons

Authors

Adam C Kellerman,Kyle R Murphy,Louis Ozeke,Alexa Jean Halford,Aaron W Breneman,Lauren W Blum,Frances Allana Staples

Journal

AGU Fall Meeting Abstracts

Published Date

2022/12

Trapped electrons in Earth's radiation belts drift on time periods that may interact with ultra-low-frequency waves leading to a change in the position and energy of radiation belt electrons. In diffusive radiation belt simulations, ULF wave-particle interactions are traditionally modeled by deriving a diffusion coefficient independent of magnetic local time (MLT). However, it is well known that ULF wave power can have a strong dependence on MLT generally a result of the source of ULF wave power (eg, the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability or the ring current). In this study, we employ a novel method to investigate the impact of ULF waves as a function of MLT. The analysis allows us to model the ULF wave MLT dependent impact on electrons of energies in the 10's of keV range and estimate the importance of this interaction compared to other physical processes that drive the evolution of this particle population.

Quantifying the Size and Duration of a Microburst‐Producing Chorus Region on 5 December 2017

Authors

Sadie Suzanne Elliott,AW Breneman,C Colpitts,JM Pettit,Cynthia A Cattell,Alexa J Halford,Mykhaylo Shumko,John Sample,AT Johnson,Yoshizumi Miyoshi,Yoshiya Kasahara,Christopher M Cully,Satoko Nakamura,Takefumi Mitani,Tomoaki Hori,Iku Shinohara,K Shiokawa,Shoya Matsuda,Martin Connors,Mitsunori Ozaki,J Manninen

Journal

Geophysical Research Letters

Published Date

2022/8/16

Microbursts are impulsive (<1 s) injections of electrons into the atmosphere, thought to be caused by nonlinear scattering by chorus waves. Although attempts have been made to quantify their contribution to outer belt electron loss, the uncertainty in the overall size and duration of the microburst region is typically large, so that their contribution to outer belt loss is uncertain. We combine datasets that measure chorus waves (Van Allen Probes [RBSP], Arase, ground‐based VLF stations) and microburst (>30 keV) precipitation (FIREBIRD II and AC6 CubeSats, POES) to determine the size of the microburst‐producing chorus source region beginning on 5 December 2017. We estimate that the long‐lasting (∼30 hr) microburst‐producing chorus region extends from 4 to 8 MLT and 2–5 L. We conclude that microbursts likely represent a major loss source of outer radiation belt electrons for this event.

Disappearance, recovery and patchiness of plasmaspheric hiss following two consecutive interplanetary shocks: First results

Authors

Suman Chakraborty,Dibyendu Chakrabarty,Geoff D Reeves,Daniel N Baker,Seth G Claudepierre,Aaron W Breneman,David P Hartley,Brian A Larsen

Journal

Authorea Preprints

Published Date

2022/11/24

We present, for the first time, a plasmaspheric hiss event observed by the Van Allen probes in response to two successive interplanetary shocks occurring within an interval of ~2 hours on December 19, 2015. The first shock arrived at 16:16 UT and caused disappearance of hiss for ~30 minutes. Significant Landau damping by suprathermal electrons followed by their gradual removal by magnetospheric compression opposed the generation of hiss causing the disappearance. Calculation of electron phase space density and linear wave growth rates showed that the shock did not change the growth rate of whistler mode waves within the core frequency range of plasmaspheric hiss (0.1 - 0.5 kHz) during this interval making conditions unfavorable for the generation of the waves. The recovery began at ~16:45 UT which is attributed to an enhancement in local plasma instability initiated by the first shock-induced substorm and additional possible contribution from chorus waves. This time, the wave growth rate peaked within the core frequency range (~350 Hz). The second shock arrived at 18:02 UT and generated patchy hiss persisting up to ~19:00 UT. It is shown that an enhanced growth rate and additional contribution from shock-induced poloidal Pc5 mode (periodicity ∼240 sec) ULF waves resulted in the excitation of hiss waves during this period. The hiss wave amplitudes were found to be additionally modulated by background plasma density and fluctuating plasmapause location. The investigation highlights the important roles of interplanetary shocks, substorms, ULF waves and background plasma density in the variability of plasmaspheric hiss.

The Van Allen Probes electric field and waves instrument: Science results, measurements, and access to data

Authors

Aaron W Breneman,John R Wygant,Sheng Tian,CA Cattell,Scott A Thaller,Keith Goetz,E Tyler,C Colpitts,Lei Dai,K Kersten,JW Bonnell,SD Bale,FS Mozer,PR Harvey,G Dalton,RE Ergun,DM Malaspina,CA Kletzing,WS Kurth,GB Hospodarsky,C Smith,RH Holzworth,S Lejosne,O Agapitov,A Artemyev,MK Hudson,RJ Strangeway,DN Baker,X Li,J Albert,JC Foster,PJ Erickson,CC Chaston,I Mann,E Donovan,CM Cully,V Krasnoselskikh,JB Blake,R Millan,AJ Halford

Published Date

2022/12

The Van Allen Probes Electric Fields and Waves (EFW) instrument provided measurements of electric fields and spacecraft floating potentials over a wide dynamic range from DC to 6.5 kHz near the equatorial plane of the inner magnetosphere between 600 km altitude and 5.8 Re geocentric distance from October 2012 to November 2019. The two identical instruments provided data to investigate the quasi-static and low frequency fields that drive large-scale convection, waves induced by interplanetary shock impacts that result in rapid relativistic particle energization, ultra-low frequency (ULF) MHD waves which can drive radial diffusion, and higher frequency wave fields and time domain structures that provide particle pitch angle scattering and energization. In addition, measurements of the spacecraft potential provided a density estimate in cold plasmas () from 10 to . The EFW instrument provided …

The Endurance Rocket Mission: Gauging Earth’s Ambipolar Electric Potential

Authors

Glyn Collinson,Alex Glocer,Rob Pfaff,Aroh Barjatya,Scott Bissett,Kolbjørn Blix,Aaron Breneman,Jim Clemmons,Francis Eparvier,Ted Gass,Robert Michell,David Mitchell,Suzie Imber,Ahmed Ghalib,Hassanali Akbari,Glen Ansted,Lisa Baddeley,Håvard Bahr,Gary Bain,Brian Bonsteel,Henry Borgen,Daniel Bowden,Dave Bowker,Tim Cameron,Meredith Campbell,Philip Cathell,Dennis Chornay,Robert Clayton,Larry Conser,Lance Davis,Sean Donohue,Leif Jonny Eilertsen,Charles Etheridge,Nathan Graves,Ingemar Häggstrøm,Preben Hanssen,Herbert Haugh,Espen Helgesen,Jordan Henderson,Kim Roar Herseth,John Hickman,Kent-Gøran Jensen,Travis Jester,Eric Johnson,Hunter Johnson,Andrew Kavanagh,Max King,David Knight,Russell Laman,Trevor Lankford,Rolf Lien,Mark Lester,Gordon Marsh,Steve Martin,Norman Morris,Long Nguyen,Richard Nelson,Wale Ogundere,Karl Henning Osbakk,Dave Page,Joe Polidan,Devon Raley,Richard Raymond,Ellen Robertson,Giovanni Rosanova,Traci Rosnack,Belinda Serabian,Roger Simonsen,Jan Arne Søreng,Jostein Sveen,Diana Swanson,Robert Swift,Paulo Uribe,Henry Valentine,Frank Waters,Libby West,Tim Wilson

Published Date

2022/8

NASA’s Endurance sounding rocket (yard No. 47.001) will launch from Ny Ålesund, Svalbard in May 2022 on a solid fueled Oriole III-A launch vehicle. Its minute flight will carry it to an altitude of above Earth’s sunlit polar cap. Its objective is to make the first measurement of the weak “ambipolar” electric field generated by Earth’s ionosphere. This field is thought to play a critical role in the upwelling and escape of ionospheric ions, and thus potentially in the evolution of Earth’s atmosphere. The results will enable us to determine the importance to ion escape of this previously unmeasured fundamental property of our planet, which will aid in a better understanding of what makes Earth habitable. Endurance will carry six science instruments (with 16 sensors) that will measure the total electrical potential drop below the spacecraft, and the physical parameters required to understand the physics of what …

The effect of compression induced chorus waves on 10s to 100s eV electron precipitation

Authors

Alexa J Halford,Katherine Garcia-Sage,Ian Mann,Drew L Turner,Aaron Breneman

Journal

Authorea Preprints

Published Date

2022/11/23

On 7 January 2014, a solar storm erupted, which eventually compressed the Earth’s magnetosphere leading to the generation of chorus waves. These waves enhanced local wave-particle interactions and led to the precipitation of electrons from 10s eV to 100s keV. This paper shows observations of a low energy cutoff in the precipitation spectrum from Van Allen Probe B Helium Oxygen Proton Electron (HOPE) measurements. This low energy cutoff is well replicated by the predicted loss calculated from pitch angle diffusion coefficients from wave and plasma observations on Probe B. To our knowledge, this is the first time a single spacecraft has been used to demonstrate an accurate theoretical prediction for chorus wave-induced precipitation and its low energy cutoff. The specific properties of the precipitating soft electron spectrum have implications for ionospheric activity, with the lowest energies mainly contributing to thermospheric and ionospheric upwelling, which influences satellite drag and ionospheric outflow.

Science of the Van Allen Probes science operations centers

Authors

Jerry W Manweiler,Aaron Breneman,Jonathan Niehof,Brian Larsen,Giuseppe Romeo,Grant Stephens,Alexa Halford,Craig Kletzing,Lawrence E Brown,Harlan Spence,Geoff Reeves,Reiner Friedel,Sonya Smith,Ruth Skoug,Bern Blake,Dan Baker,Shri Kanekal,Vaughn Hoxie,Allison Jaynes,John Wygant,John Bonnell,Danielle Crawford,Matina Gkioulidou,Louis J Lanzerotti,Donald G Mitchell,Andrew Gerrard,Aleksandr Ukhorskiy,Thomas Sotirelis,Robin J Barnes,Robyn Millan,Blaine Harris

Published Date

2022/12

The Van Allen Probes mission operations materialized through a distributed model in which operational responsibility was divided between the Mission Operations Center (MOC) and separate instrument specific SOCs. The sole MOC handled all aspects of telemetering and receiving tasks as well as certain scientifically relevant ancillary tasks. Each instrument science team developed individual instrument specific SOCs proficient in unique capabilities in support of science data acquisition, data processing, instrument performance, and tools for the instrument team scientists. In parallel activities, project scientists took on the task of providing a significant modeling tool base usable by the instrument science teams and the larger scientific community. With a mission as complex as Van Allen Probes, scientific inquiry occurred due to constant and significant collaboration between the SOCs and in concert with the project …

See List of Professors in Aaron Breneman University(University of Minnesota-Twin Cities)

Aaron Breneman FAQs

What is Aaron Breneman's h-index at University of Minnesota-Twin Cities?

The h-index of Aaron Breneman has been 24 since 2020 and 30 in total.

What are Aaron Breneman's top articles?

The articles with the titles of

Chapman conference: Particle Precipitation: Drivers, Properties, and Impacts on Atmosphere, Ionosphere, Magnetosphere (AIM) Coupling–Feb 2025 at RMIT in Melbourne, AU

A New Four‐Component L*‐Dependent Model for Radial Diffusion Based on Solar Wind and Magnetospheric Drivers of ULF Waves

Earth's magnetosphere dynamics during" forced breathing" due to solar wind periodic density structures

Observation of an Electron Microburst With an Inverse Time‐Of‐Flight Energy Dispersion

Using multipoint observations to quantify microburst precipitation caused by whistler mode chorus waves

Understanding the properties, wave drivers, and impacts of electron microburst precipitation: current understanding and critical knowledge gaps

Atmospheric and ionospheric impacts of energetic particle precipitation (EPP) from Earth's ring current and radiation belts

Cross-scale physics and the acceleration of particles in collisionless plasmas throughout the Heliosphere and beyond: III. Radiation belts

...

are the top articles of Aaron Breneman at University of Minnesota-Twin Cities.

What are Aaron Breneman's research interests?

The research interests of Aaron Breneman are: Space Plasma Physics

What is Aaron Breneman's total number of citations?

Aaron Breneman has 2,591 citations in total.

    academic-engine

    Useful Links