Aamir Raina

Aamir Raina

Aligarh Muslim University

H-index: 28

Asia-India

About Aamir Raina

Aamir Raina, With an exceptional h-index of 28 and a recent h-index of 27 (since 2020), a distinguished researcher at Aligarh Muslim University, specializes in the field of Plant Breeding and Crop Genetics, Mutagenesis, Molecular Breeding, Marker Assisted Selection.

His recent articles reflect a diverse array of research interests and contributions to the field:

Improving French Bean Yield Potential through Induced Mutagenesis using EMS and SA

SINE Markers as a Powerful Tool for Assessing Genetic Diversity to Improve Potato

Conventional and new-breeding technologies for improving disease resistance in lentil (Lens culinaris Medik)

Recent advances in artificial intelligence, mechanistic models and speed breeding offer exciting opportunities for precise and accelerated genomics-assisted breeding

Legume Breeding in Transition: Innovation and Outlook

Physiological responses of common bean genotypes to drought stress

Induced Mutagenesis-A Reliable Technology to Overcome the Limitations of Low Genetic Variability in Lentils

Mutagenesis in Genetic Improvement of Lentil: Development of Multipodding Mutant via Gamma Rays

Aamir Raina Information

University

Aligarh Muslim University

Position

Assistant Professor Department of Botany India

Citations(all)

2032

Citations(since 2020)

1908

Cited By

440

hIndex(all)

28

hIndex(since 2020)

27

i10Index(all)

46

i10Index(since 2020)

46

Email

University Profile Page

Aligarh Muslim University

Aamir Raina Skills & Research Interests

Plant Breeding and Crop Genetics

Mutagenesis

Molecular Breeding

Marker Assisted Selection

Top articles of Aamir Raina

Improving French Bean Yield Potential through Induced Mutagenesis using EMS and SA

Authors

Rafiul Amin Laskar,Bhaskar Dowarah,Dilip Tamang,Sangeeta Das,Protiva Borah,Aamir Raina

Journal

Frontiers in Horticulture

Published Date

2024/1

Methods: To achieve this, we initiated an induced mutagenesis program. Seeds from the village seed stock were subjected to treatments with varying doses of ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS) ranging from 0.1% to 0.4% and sodium azide (SA) from 0.1% to 0.4%. The objective was to increase yield potential and enhance genetic diversity.Results: The treatment with EMS and SA led to a non-specific, dosage-independent reduction in biophysiological characteristics in French bean mutants. Notably, the 0.4% SA treatment significantly inhibited germination and fertility, causing a decrease in chlorophyll (10.02 mg. g-1 FW) and carotenoid (1.57 mg. g-1 FW) levels. This suggests a disruption in genes associated with chlorophyll and carotenoid synthesis. However, in the M2 generation, the mutagenic treatments substantially improved yield and associated traits. The highest pod yield per plant was recorded at 79.50 gm for the 0.2% EMS treatment. A character association study revealed strong correlations (0.217 to 0.995) between pod yield and other agronomic traits.Discussion: The results indicate that selecting mutants based on these traits in populations treated with EMS and SA can significantly increase crop yield. The 0.2% SA and 0.2% EMS M2 mutant populations exhibited the highest induced variability, making them ideal for selecting higher-yielding mutant lines for further breeding generations. The increased yields in these mutant lines, derived from a local cultivar, show promise for meeting the growing demand for French bean production through their widespread cultivation.

SINE Markers as a Powerful Tool for Assessing Genetic Diversity to Improve Potato

Authors

Nasya Tomlekova,Sibel Aziz,Emiliya Nacheva,Beatrice Weber,Aamir Raina,Kathrin M Seibt

Published Date

2023/9/8

Potato is an important global food source. The tetraploid potato is a genetically complex and heterozygous crop, which makes it difficult to introgress desirable traits from wild relatives. Therefore, in order to increase the genetic variability of the breeding material, mutagenesis is effectively used, for instance, by chemical agents.This chapter summarizes the results obtained at the Maritsa Vegetable Crops Research Institute in Plovdiv, Bulgaria, with regard to the evaluation of the genetic diversity of local potato varieties and 16 advanced mutant lines (M1V8) and the corresponding parental components which were divided into four groups according the origin on the initial genotypes, using the retrotransposon-based molecular technique of inter-SINE amplified polymorphism (ISAP).ISAP reactions with the two SINE families (SolS-IIIa and SolS-IV) proved to be the most efficient for the molecular identification. Of all the …

Conventional and new-breeding technologies for improving disease resistance in lentil (Lens culinaris Medik)

Authors

Anirban Roy,Parmeshwar K Sahu,Camellia Das,Somnath Bhattacharyya,Aamir Raina,Suvendu Mondal

Published Date

2023/4/10

Lentil, an important cool season food legume, is a rich source of easily digestible protein, folic acid, bio-available iron, and zinc nutrients. Lentil grows mainly as a sole crop in the winter after harvesting rice in South Asia. However, the annual productivity is low due to its slow growth during the early phase, competitive weed infestation, and disease outbreaks during the crop growth period. Disease resistance breeding has been practiced for a long time to enhance resistance to various diseases. Often the sources of resistance are available in wild crop relatives. Thus, wide hybridization and the ovule rescue technique have helped to introgress the resistance trait into cultivated lentils. Besides hybridization, induced mutagenesis contributed immensely in creating variability for disease tolerance, and several disease-resistant mutant lines have been developed. However, to overcome the limitations of traditional breeding approaches, advancement in molecular marker technologies, and genomics has helped to develop disease-resistant and climate-resilient lentil varieties with more precision and efficiency. This review describes types of diseases, disease screening methods, the role of conventional and new breeding technologies in alleviating disease-incurred damage and progress toward making lentil varieties more resilient to disease outbreaks under the shadow of climate change.

Recent advances in artificial intelligence, mechanistic models and speed breeding offer exciting opportunities for precise and accelerated genomics-assisted breeding

Authors

Javaid Akhter Bhat,Xianzhong Feng,Zahoor A Mir,Aamir Raina,Kadambot HM Siddique

Published Date

2023/7

Given the challenges of population growth and climate change, there is an urgent need to expedite the development of high‐yielding stress‐tolerant crop cultivars. While traditional breeding methods have been instrumental in ensuring global food security, their efficiency, precision, and labour intensiveness have become increasingly inadequate to address present and future challenges. Fortunately, recent advances in high‐throughput phenomics and genomics‐assisted breeding (GAB) provide a promising platform for enhancing crop cultivars with greater efficiency. However, several obstacles must be overcome to optimize the use of these techniques in crop improvement, such as the complexity of phenotypic analysis of big image data. In addition, the prevalent use of linear models in genome‐wide association studies (GWAS) and genomic selection (GS) fails to capture the nonlinear interactions of complex traits …

Legume Breeding in Transition: Innovation and Outlook

Authors

Aamir Raina,Rafiul Amin Laskar,Samiullah Khan,Nasya Borisova Tomlekova,Waltram Ravelombola,MAHENDAR THUDI

Journal

Frontiers in Genetics

Published Date

2023/5

Frontiers | Editorial: Legume breeding in transition: innovation and outlook Skip to main content Top bar navigation Frontiers in Genetics About us About us Who we are Mission Values History Leadership Awards Impact and progress Frontiers' impact Progress Report 2022 All progress reports Publishing model How we publish Open access Fee policy Peer review Research Topics Services Societies National consortia Institutional partnerships Collaborators More from Frontiers Frontiers Forum Press office Career opportunities Contact us All journalsAll articles Submit your research Search Frontiers in Genetics Sections Sections Applied Genetic Epidemiology Behavioral and Psychiatric Genetics Cancer Genetics and Oncogenomics Computational Genomics ELSI in Science and Genetics Epigenomics and Epigenetics Evolutionary and Population Genetics Genetics of Aging Genetics of Common and Rare Diseases …

Physiological responses of common bean genotypes to drought stress

Authors

Petko Mladenov,Sibel Aziz,Elena Topalova,Jenny Renaut,Sébastien Planchon,Aamir Raina,Nasya Tomlekova

Journal

Agronomy

Published Date

2023/3/30

Drought compromises edible vegetable production worldwide, including common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) an economically important crop that is highly dependent on optimum rainfall or abundant irrigation. In the present study, phenotypic data of 26 Bulgarian common bean mutant lines and cultivars subjected to drought stress has been summarized, and drought stress reaction was evaluated by chlorophyll fluorescence and proteomics approaches. Several basic photosynthetic parameters were examined during treatment to evaluate the drought stress response, and the mutant lines showed different responses. Subsequently, a relationship was found between productivity and photosynthetic performance with the expression of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase through comparative 2D-gel based electrophoresis; accumulation of the well-known stress-related proteins markers dehydrins and small heat shock proteins was established as well. These findings support the further selection of drought tolerant common bean lines for a sustainable agriculture.

Induced Mutagenesis-A Reliable Technology to Overcome the Limitations of Low Genetic Variability in Lentils

Authors

Mohammad Rafiq Wani,Aamir Raina,Nasya Tomlekova,Rafiul Amin Laskar,Mohammad Feroz,Samiullah Khan

Published Date

2023/9/8

Practices of agriculture and plant breeding approaches are indispensable for feeding the populaces of the world. In agriculture, the grain legumes occupy a unique position for their value as food and fodder, their role in biological nitrogen fixation, and as industrial raw materials. There are several reasons for the low productivity of pulses, which include a lack of high yielding genotypes, the vagaries of the monsoon, sowing on marginal lands under rain-fed conditions, negligence of plant protection, and imbalances of plant nutrients. Lack of genetic variability limits the scope of selection for better genotypes. For improvement in seed yield, genetic reconstitution of such crops is required to evolve better plant types. Mutation breeding has proven beneficial to upsurge the existing germplasm variability for improving certain specific traits of the varieties. By integrating molecular high throughput mutation screening …

Mutagenesis in Genetic Improvement of Lentil: Development of Multipodding Mutant via Gamma Rays

Authors

Rafiul Amin Laskar,Aamir Raina,Nilofer Sheikh,Mohammad Rafiq Wani,Samiullah Khan

Published Date

2023/4/30

Plant breeders examine species differences to find genotypes with desirable characteristics. Chronological spontaneous mutation, genotypic recombination within a species, and interactions with the environment contribute to natural variance. Mutations are responsible for all variations in biological populations, including plants. A sufficient amount of genetic variation is essential for any crop improvement program. If the trait of interest does not appear in the normal population, mutagenesis must be used to produce new alleles that regulate the trait. As a consequence, both biological developmental 254evolution and plant breeding require mutations. Induced mutation-based breeding has been used to produce new alleles or genes in existing genotypes, as well as to alter physiological, agronomical, and quality traits in crop plants. Mutagenesis is the process of inducing mutations in seeds and other parts of plants …

Mutagenic effect of gamma rays on induced mutation and principal component analysis of yield characters on green gram in M2 generation

Authors

Soundarya Vasudevan,Arulbalachandran Dhanarajan,Aamir Raina,Yasmin Kasim,Govindasamy Balasubramani,Selvakumar Gurunathan,Balamurugan Venkatachalam

Journal

Plant Science Today

Published Date

2023/7/1

The present study was aimed to evaluate the effect of gamma irradiation on green gram through chlorophyll mutation frequency, leaf mutation frequency, mutagenic effectiveness and efficiency and principal component analysis. Eight different types of chlorophyll mutants, namely albino, aurea, striata, tigrina, xantha, chlorina, viridis, xanthaviridis and variegated were observed at different doses of gamma irradiation in M2 generation. Albino showed the highest frequency percentage (0.229) followed by Viridis (0.163) and Xantha (0.131) and the highest frequency was noted at 500 Gray (Gy). Though, chlorophyll mutants can be lethal in nature, they increase genetic variability and induce new traits. Leaf mutant is another key indicator for induced mutations that induce leaf morphology changes and the highest frequency was noted in 500 Gy. Among the mutagenic treatments, the mutagenic effectiveness shows the maximum at 100 Gy and efficiency shows at 500 Gy. This indicated that low to moderate doses are more effective for induced mutation. This was also confirmed by Principal Component Analysis (PCA) results, which specified that gamma irradiation of 500 Gy indicated that the first five principal components were attributed to 70.82% total variability of traits studied. From this, the experimental finding evidently showed that 500 Gy of gamma irradiation, an optimum dose, resulted in considerable variation in all the parameters analyzed.

Chromium toxicity in plants: signaling, mitigation, and future perspectives

Authors

Sajad Ali,Rakeeb A Mir,Anshika Tyagi,Nazia Manzar,Abhijeet Shankar Kashyap,Muntazir Mushtaq,Aamir Raina,Suvin Park,Sandhya Sharma,Zahoor A Mir,Showkat A Lone,Ajaz A Bhat,Uqab Baba,Henda Mahmoudi,Hanhong Bae

Published Date

2023/3/29

Plants are very often confronted by different heavy metal (HM) stressors that adversely impair their growth and productivity. Among HMs, chromium (Cr) is one of the most prevalent toxic trace metals found in agricultural soils because of anthropogenic activities, lack of efficient treatment, and unregulated disposal. It has a huge detrimental impact on the physiological, biochemical, and molecular traits of crops, in addition to being carcinogenic to humans. In soil, Cr exists in different forms, including Cr (III) “trivalent” and Cr (VI) “hexavalent”, but the most pervasive and severely hazardous form to the biota is Cr (VI). Despite extensive research on the effects of Cr stress, the exact molecular mechanisms of Cr sensing, uptake, translocation, phytotoxicity, transcript processing, translation, post-translational protein modifications, as well as plant defensive responses are still largely unknown. Even though plants lack a Cr transporter system, it is efficiently accumulated and transported by other essential ion transporters, hence posing a serious challenge to the development of Cr-tolerant cultivars. In this review, we discuss Cr toxicity in plants, signaling perception, and transduction. Further, we highlight various mitigation processes for Cr toxicity in plants, such as microbial, chemical, and nano-based priming. We also discuss the biotechnological advancements in mitigating Cr toxicity in plants using plant and microbiome engineering approaches. Additionally, we also highlight the role of molecular breeding in mitigating Cr toxicity in sustainable agriculture. Finally, some conclusions are drawn along with potential directions for future research in order to better …

Improvement of Yield in Cowpea Varieties Using Different Breeding Approaches

Authors

Aamir Raina,Rafiul Amin Laskar,Mohammad Rafiq Wani,Samiullah Khan

Published Date

2023/9/8

Cowpea is an important warm-season legume growing in arid and semi-arid regions. The cowpea productivity is low compared to other legumes such as chickpea, lentil, faba bean and mung bean. The low productivity is attributed to different abiotic and biotic stresses, therefore, different breeding strategies have been introduced and implemented to alleviate the negative impact of environmental stresses. In this chapter, we reviewed the contributions of conventional approaches and modern breeding strategies and their role in the improvement of cowpea genotypes. This chapter discusses in detail challenges and landmark achievements of hybridization, tissue culture, mutation breeding and molecular breeding and its role in mitigating the abiotic and biotic stresses, improving yield and nutritional traits, mining of QTLs associated with economically important traits, development and fine tuning of genetic maps in …

Chemical Mutagens Induced Altered Frequency and Spectrum of Mutants in Chickpea [Cicer arietinum (L.)]

Authors

Aamir Raina,Kousar Parveen,Samiullah Khan

Journal

Biotechnologies and Genetics in Plant Mutation Breeding: Volume 3: Mechanisms for Genetic Manipulation of Plants and Plant Mutants

Published Date

2023/4/30

The present study was undertaken to assess the frequency and spectrum of morphological mutants (screened in M2 generation) and to study the mutagenic effects of hydrazine hydrate (HZ), methyl methanesulphonate (MMS), and sodium azide in two varieties of chickpea, namely, Pusa-212 and BG-256. Several morphological mutants were screened in the population of two varieties of chickpea in M2 generation. Among the mutagens, MMS induced a higher frequency of plant height mutants, and HZ induced a higher frequency of growth habit mutants. Whereas variety-based pooled frequency revealed var. Pusa-212 showed a higher frequency of plant height and growth habit mutants. Even though most of the morphological mutants were uneconomical; however, these might be useful to plant breeders, as a source of many beneficial genes in hybridization programs.

Field assessment of yield and its contributing traits of cowpea treated with lower, intermediate, and higher doses of gamma rays and sodium azide

Authors

Aamir Raina,Samiullah Khan

Journal

Frontiers in Plant Science

Published Date

2023/6

Across the globe, plant breeders of different organizations are working in collaboration to bring preferred traits to crops of economic importance. Among the traits, “high yielding potential” is the most important as it is directly associated with food security and nutrition, one of the sustainable development goals. The Food and Agriculture Organization acknowledges plant breeders’ role and efforts in achieving local and global food security and nutrition. Recognizing the importance of pulses and increasing pressure on food security, the United Nations General Assembly declared 2016 the “International year of Pulses” owing to their preferred traits such as climate change resilience, wide adaptability, low agriculture input, and protein- and nutrient-rich crops. Keeping all these developments in consideration, we initiated an induced mutagenesis program by treating cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp.) with different doses of gamma rays and sodium azide aiming to enhance the yielding potential of an otherwise outstanding variety viz., Gomati VU-89 and Pusa-578. We noticed a substantial increase in mean values of agronomic traits in putative mutants raised from seeds treated with lower and intermediate doses of mutagens. Statistical analysis such as correlation, path, hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA), and principal component analysis (PCA) were used to assess the difference between mutagenized and control populations. A significant and positive correlation of yield with yield-attributing traits was recorded. However, among all the yield attributing traits, seeds per pod (SPP) depicted the maximum direct impact upon yield, and therefore …

Biofortified foxtail millet: towards a more nourishing future

Authors

Krishnananda P Ingle,P Suprasanna,Gopal Wasudeo Narkhede,Antony Ceasar,Gholamreza Abdi,Aamir Raina,MP Moharil,Atul Singh

Published Date

2023/1

Biofortification of staple food crops is an economical and practical way to mitigate micronutrient malnutrition as it predisposes humans to different health maladies. Despite the availability of various methods for biofortification, the biofortified crops, especially millets, could offer a great scope. Foxtail millet has adequate content of minerals, non-starchy polysaccharides, vital amino acids, and proteins, and is regarded as one of the most important nutri-cereals. However, biofortified foxtail millet can potentially alleviate the micronutrient deficiency. Genetic modification to improve the micronutrient content through the available zinc and iron-regulated transporters in foxtail millet can be useful to fine tune the enrichment of micronutrients. The availability of well annotated foxtail millet genome sequence information can facilitate gene mining, transcripts and proteins related to nutritional quality. Combining the insights gained …

Plant Breeding from Classical Genetics to Molecular Approaches for Food and Nutrition Security

Authors

Aamir Raina,Rafiul Amin Laskar,Mohammad Rafiq Wani,Nasya Tomlekova,Samiullah Khan

Published Date

2023/8/2

Concerns over global food security have a significant influence on the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals, which have been primarily centered on ending hunger by 2030. According to the 2019 Global Food Security Index, 88% of nations claim to have enough food supply. Still, the fact is that one out of every three countries has an insufficient food supply, implying that more than 10% of the population is malnourished. Plant breeding approaches have been used since ancient times to achieve food security by creating crop varieties with high yield and wide adaptability. Different conventional breeding approaches such as mutagenesis, which involves treating seeds or whole plants with mutagenic chemicals or high-energy radiation in the hopes of creating phenotypic enhancements; this, too, resulted in unforeseen and undiscovered genetic implications from which the plant breeder picked the advantageous …

Role of Mutation and Molecular Breeding in the Improvement of Cowpea, a Primary Pulse Crop

Authors

Aamir Raina,Rafiul Amin Laskar,Mohammad Rafiq Wani,Samiullah Khan

Journal

Biotechnologies and Genetics in Plant Mutation Breeding: Volume 3: Mechanisms for Genetic Manipulation of Plants and Plant Mutants

Published Date

2023/4/30

Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp., commonly known as cowpea, is recognized as a primary pulse crop by Food and Agriculture Organization. Cowpea is a nutritious and versatile crop, which has the ability to withstand higher atmospheric temperature. However, the crop is low yielding as compared to other pulse crops, and different breeding strategies have been employed from time to time to enhance the yielding potential and overall agronomy of the crop. Among the breeding strategies, mutation breeding has been the most successful in increasing the yield and genetic variability in the existing cowpea cultivars. In mutation breeding, the selection of an appropriate mutagen, mutagen dose and genotypic sensitivity, and mutagenic effectiveness and efficiency are important aspects that determine the success of crop improvement programs. In addition to mutation breeding, advanced molecular breeding has also achieved …

Comparative effects of caffeine and lead nitrate on the bio-physiological and yield associated traits of lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.)

Authors

Janib Yousuf,Aamir Raina,Shiekh Rasik,Zubair Altaf Reshi,Durre Shahwar

Journal

Heliyon

Published Date

2023/6/1

Lentil belonging to the fabaceae family is a proteinaceous cool-season legume consumed across the world. However, lentil is low yielding with a narrow genetic base compared to other grain legumes such as chickpea, faba bean, and cowpea. In the present study, we intended to investigate the effect of two different mutagens viz., caffeine and lead nitrate on the bio-physiological and agronomical traits of lentil. Unlike other mutagens like ethyl methanesulphonate, sodium azide, and hydrazine hydrates very little is known about the mutagenic potency of caffeine and lead nitrate. The results revealed contrasting effects as lower doses of caffeine-induced a substantial increase in mean values of physiological and agronomical traits whereas both lower and higher doses of lead nitrate negatively impacted the agronomical traits of lentil. Among the mutagen doses, 0.1% caffeine was most efficient in inducing a …

Contribution of Conventional Breeding Approaches in Legumes Biofortification

Authors

Hafiz Muhammad Ahmad,Sadaf Zahra,Sadaf Oranab,Shazia Arif,Shehnaz Zakia,Aamir Raina,Muhammad Zubair Khan,Flavien Shimira,Ghassan Zahid,Saira Bano

Published Date

2023/11/9

Deficiency of important micronutrients in human diet is usually known as hidden hunger. Globally, malnutrition affects the life of about 2 billion people. Especially, the life of pregnant women and children of developing countries is affected very badly. In the past, plant breeders majorly focused to increase the crop productivity by improving resistance against biotic and abiotic stresses. A very less attention was given to improve the nutritional accumulations of crops. Recently, biofortification of crop plants has been considered an objective of major breeding programmes by combining conventional breeding and genetic engineering tools. This chapter focuses on various approaches adopted by conventional breeding programmes to fortify the food legumes for bioavailability, translocation and uptake of micronutrients. We also highlighted the strategies of legume breeders to improve the vitamins and diminish the anti …

Induced Mutagenesis: A Successful Breeding Strategy for Crop Improvement

Authors

Mohammad Rafiq Wani,Aamir Raina,Saba Yaqoob,Rafiul Amin Laskar,Samiullah Khan,TARIQ AHMAD

Journal

Biotechnologies and Genetics in Plant Mutation Breeding: Volume 1: Mutagenesis and Crop Improvement

Published Date

2023/4/30

Grain legumes or pulses are among the most accessible source of nutritional food, especially to the large economically constraint and resource-poor population in developing nations including India. The crop improvement programmes aiming at yield enhancement, disease resistance, and stress 70adaptability have been going on for decades now to meet out the increasing demand emerging from exploding population. Although, the advancement from classical to modern plant breeding techniques had accelerated the process significantly, but the constant pressure from increasing production demand and various stress factors make this a continuous evolutionary process, necessitating the innovative interventions. Among such technique, induced mutagenesis impresses the breeder’s imagination the most, as with mutation everything is possible. Thus, mutation breeding in a way empowered plant breeder to do …

Assessment of Bio-physiological damages and cytological aberrations in cowpea varieties treated with gamma rays and sodium azide

Authors

Aamir Raina,Younas Rasheed Tantray,Samiullah Khan

Journal

PloS one

Published Date

2023/7/20

The assessment of mutagen induced biological damage forms an important study in determining the mutagenic potency and genotypic sensitivity, a vital aspect in mutation breeding programs. A prior assessment of lethal dose (LD50), mutagen induced biological damage (alterations in bio-physiological traits and frequency of cytological aberrations) is a prerequisite for determining an optimum mutagen dose in a successful mutation breeding experiment. Therefore, in a multi-year project of mutation breeding, two widely cultivated varieties of cowpea viz., Gomati VU-89 and Pusa-578, were treated with gamma (γ) rays and sodium azide (SA) doses. The results reflected a proportionate increase in bio-physiological damages with the increase in mutagenic doses and caused a substantial reduction in mean seed germination and seedling height. Different cytological aberrations such as cytomixis, univalents, chromosome stickiness, precocious separation, unequal separation, bridges, laggards, disturbed polarity, dyads, triads, and polyads were observed in both varieties. All the mutagen doses induced a broader spectrum of cytological aberrations with varying frequencies.

See List of Professors in Aamir Raina University(Aligarh Muslim University)

Aamir Raina FAQs

What is Aamir Raina's h-index at Aligarh Muslim University?

The h-index of Aamir Raina has been 27 since 2020 and 28 in total.

What are Aamir Raina's top articles?

The articles with the titles of

Improving French Bean Yield Potential through Induced Mutagenesis using EMS and SA

SINE Markers as a Powerful Tool for Assessing Genetic Diversity to Improve Potato

Conventional and new-breeding technologies for improving disease resistance in lentil (Lens culinaris Medik)

Recent advances in artificial intelligence, mechanistic models and speed breeding offer exciting opportunities for precise and accelerated genomics-assisted breeding

Legume Breeding in Transition: Innovation and Outlook

Physiological responses of common bean genotypes to drought stress

Induced Mutagenesis-A Reliable Technology to Overcome the Limitations of Low Genetic Variability in Lentils

Mutagenesis in Genetic Improvement of Lentil: Development of Multipodding Mutant via Gamma Rays

...

are the top articles of Aamir Raina at Aligarh Muslim University.

What are Aamir Raina's research interests?

The research interests of Aamir Raina are: Plant Breeding and Crop Genetics, Mutagenesis, Molecular Breeding, Marker Assisted Selection

What is Aamir Raina's total number of citations?

Aamir Raina has 2,032 citations in total.

What are the co-authors of Aamir Raina?

The co-authors of Aamir Raina are Ashwell Ndhlala, Javaid Akhter Bhat, Hina Younus, Rafiul Amin Laskar, Mohd Irfan Naikoo, Mudasir Irfan Dar.

Co-Authors

H-index: 39
Ashwell Ndhlala

Ashwell Ndhlala

University of Limpopo

H-index: 32
Javaid Akhter Bhat

Javaid Akhter Bhat

Nanjing Agricultural University

H-index: 27
Hina Younus

Hina Younus

Aligarh Muslim University

H-index: 25
Rafiul Amin Laskar

Rafiul Amin Laskar

Aligarh Muslim University

H-index: 14
Mohd Irfan Naikoo

Mohd Irfan Naikoo

Aligarh Muslim University

H-index: 13
Mudasir Irfan Dar

Mudasir Irfan Dar

Aligarh Muslim University

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