Aakaash Rao

Aakaash Rao

Harvard University

H-index: 5

North America-United States

About Aakaash Rao

Aakaash Rao, With an exceptional h-index of 5 and a recent h-index of 5 (since 2020), a distinguished researcher at Harvard University, specializes in the field of Political economy, Experimental economics, Behavioral economics.

His recent articles reflect a diverse array of research interests and contributions to the field:

The immigrant next door

Justifying dissent

Opinions as Facts

Political adverse selection

Scapegoating during crises

University of Chicago

Aakaash Rao Information

University

Harvard University

Position

___

Citations(all)

697

Citations(since 2020)

686

Cited By

184

hIndex(all)

5

hIndex(since 2020)

5

i10Index(all)

4

i10Index(since 2020)

4

Email

University Profile Page

Harvard University

Aakaash Rao Skills & Research Interests

Political economy

Experimental economics

Behavioral economics

Top articles of Aakaash Rao

The immigrant next door

Authors

Leonardo Bursztyn,Thomas Chaney,Tarek Alexander Hassan,Aakaash Rao

Journal

American Economic Review

Published Date

2023

We study how decades-long exposure to individuals of a given foreign descent shapes natives’ attitudes and behavior toward that group. Using individualized donations data, we show that long-term exposure to a given foreign ancestry leads to more generous behavior specifically toward that group’s ancestral country. Focusing on exposure to Arab Muslims to examine mechanisms, we show that long-term exposure (i) decreases explicit and implicit prejudice against Arab Muslims, (ii) reduces support for policies and political candidates hostile toward Arab Muslims, (iii) increases charitable donations to Arab countries, (iv) leads to more personal contact with Arab Muslims, and (v) increases knowledge of Arab Muslims and Islam. (JEL D64, D83, D91, J15)

Justifying dissent

Authors

Leonardo Bursztyn,Georgy Egorov,Ingar Haaland,Aakaash Rao,Christopher Roth

Journal

The Quarterly Journal of Economics

Published Date

2023/8

Dissent plays an important role in any society, but dissenters are often silenced through social sanctions. Beyond their persuasive effects, rationales providing arguments supporting dissenters’ causes can increase the public expression of dissent by providing a “social cover” for voicing otherwise stigmatized positions. Motivated by a simple theoretical framework, we experimentally show that liberals are more willing to post a tweet opposing the movement to defund the police, are seen as less prejudiced, and face lower social sanctions when their tweet implies they had first read credible scientific evidence supporting their position. Analogous experiments with conservatives demonstrate that the same mechanisms facilitate anti-immigrant expression. Our findings highlight both the power of rationales and their limitations in enabling dissent and shed light on phenomena such as social movements, political …

Opinions as Facts

Authors

Leonardo Bursztyn,Aakaash Rao,Christopher Roth,David Yanagizawa-Drott

Journal

Review of Economic Studies

Published Date

2022

The rise of opinion programs has transformed television news. Because they present anchors’ subjective commentary and analysis, opinion programs often convey conflicting narratives about reality. We experimentally document that people across the ideological spectrum turn to opinion programs over “straight news”, even when provided large incentives to learn objective facts. We then examine the consequences of diverging narratives between opinion programs in a high-stakes setting: the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic in the US. We find stark differences in the adoption of preventative behaviours among viewers of the two most popular opinion programs, both on the same network, which adopted opposing narratives about the threat posed by the COVID-19 pandemic. We then show that areas with greater relative viewership of the program downplaying the threat experienced a greater number of …

Political adverse selection

Authors

Leonardo Bursztyn,Jonathan T Kolstad,Aakaash Rao,Pietro Tebaldi,Noam Yuchtman

Published Date

2022/7/4

We study how the politicization of policies designed to correct market failures can undermine their effectiveness. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) was among the most politically divisive expansions of the US government. We examine whether partisanship distorted enrollment and market outcomes in the ACA insurance marketplaces. Controlling for observable characteristics and holding fixed plans and premiums available, Republicans enrolled less than Democrats and independents in ACA marketplace plans. Selection out of the ACA marketplaces was strongest among Republicans with lower expected healthcare costs, generating adverse selection. Computing enrollment and average cost with and without partisan differences, we find that this political adverse selection reduced enrollment by around three million people and raised average costs in the marketplaces, increasing the level of public spending necessary to provide subsidies to low-income enrollees by around $105 per enrollee per year. Lower enrollments and higher costs are concentrated in more Republican areas, potentially contributing to polarized views of the ACA.

Scapegoating during crises

Authors

Leonardo Bursztyn,Georgy Egorov,Ingar Haaland,Aakaash Rao,Christopher Roth

Journal

AEA Papers and Proceedings

Published Date

2022/5/1

Economic crises are often accompanied by waves of antiminority behavior. We build on the framework developed in Bursztyn et al. (2022) to propose that crises, in addition to shifting people's attitudes toward minorities, can provide intolerant people with a plausible rationale for expressing their preexisting prejudice. The availability of such a rationale thus increases antiminority behavior by reducing the associated social sanctions. In an experiment examining how economic crises affect social inference about the motives underlying xenophobic behavior, we find that crises lead respondents to ascribe antiminority behavior to economic concerns rather than to innate xenophobia.

University of Chicago

Authors

Leonardo Bursztyn,A Rao,C Roth,D Yanagizawa-Drott

Journal

Becker Friedman Institute for Economics Working Paper

Published Date

2020

Research Statement Page 1 1 Research Statement Leonardo Bursztyn University of Chicago August 2018 The bulk of my work uses field experiments, often combined with observational data, to better understand how individuals’ economic decisions are shaped by their social environment. Individuals make decisions within their household, students make decisions within their classroom, investors make financial decisions within their circle of friends. I study not only whether one’s social environment shapes one’s decisions, but also why one’s social environment matters. In particular, my recent work focuses on the role of social pressure and social norms in shaping important economic decisions. My work has examined educational, labor market, financial, consumption, and political decisions, both in developing and developed countries. Although my research is mostly empirical, it is usually closely connected to …

See List of Professors in Aakaash Rao University(Harvard University)

Aakaash Rao FAQs

What is Aakaash Rao's h-index at Harvard University?

The h-index of Aakaash Rao has been 5 since 2020 and 5 in total.

What are Aakaash Rao's top articles?

The articles with the titles of

The immigrant next door

Justifying dissent

Opinions as Facts

Political adverse selection

Scapegoating during crises

University of Chicago

are the top articles of Aakaash Rao at Harvard University.

What are Aakaash Rao's research interests?

The research interests of Aakaash Rao are: Political economy, Experimental economics, Behavioral economics

What is Aakaash Rao's total number of citations?

Aakaash Rao has 697 citations in total.

What are the co-authors of Aakaash Rao?

The co-authors of Aakaash Rao are Georgy Egorov, Jonathan T Kolstad, Leonardo Bursztyn, Tarek Alexander Hassan, David Yanagizawa-Drott.

    Co-Authors

    H-index: 27
    Georgy Egorov

    Georgy Egorov

    North Western University

    H-index: 24
    Jonathan T Kolstad

    Jonathan T Kolstad

    University of California, Berkeley

    H-index: 22
    Leonardo Bursztyn

    Leonardo Bursztyn

    University of Chicago

    H-index: 20
    Tarek Alexander Hassan

    Tarek Alexander Hassan

    Boston University

    H-index: 16
    David Yanagizawa-Drott

    David Yanagizawa-Drott

    Universität Zürich

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