A. M. Aramati Casper

A. M. Aramati Casper

Colorado State University

H-index: 9

North America-United States

About A. M. Aramati Casper

A. M. Aramati Casper, With an exceptional h-index of 9 and a recent h-index of 9 (since 2020), a distinguished researcher at Colorado State University, specializes in the field of Ecology Education, Forest Ecology, Systems Thinking, Social Justice, Diversity.

His recent articles reflect a diverse array of research interests and contributions to the field:

Bringing Social Justice Context into Civil Engineering Courses for First-Year and Third-Year Students

“It’s completely erasure”: A Qualitative Exploration of Experiences of Transgender, Nonbinary, Gender Nonconforming, and Questioning Students in Biology Courses

The impact of emergency remote learning on students in engineering and computer science in the United States: An analysis of four universities

Leveraging Sustainability to Teach About Social Justice in Civil Engineering Curricula

Revealing the queer-spectrum in STEM through robust demographic data collection in undergraduate engineering and computer science courses at four institutions

Teaching the Socially-Situated Nature of Climate Change Science in Technical STEM Courses: A Hurricane Katrina Case Study

Surprises along the Path toward Equity in Engineering and Computer Science Education

Linking engineering students’ professional identity development to diversity and working inclusively in technical courses

A. M. Aramati Casper Information

University

Colorado State University

Position

___

Citations(all)

316

Citations(since 2020)

285

Cited By

52

hIndex(all)

9

hIndex(since 2020)

9

i10Index(all)

9

i10Index(since 2020)

7

Email

University Profile Page

Colorado State University

A. M. Aramati Casper Skills & Research Interests

Ecology Education

Forest Ecology

Systems Thinking

Social Justice

Diversity

Top articles of A. M. Aramati Casper

Bringing Social Justice Context into Civil Engineering Courses for First-Year and Third-Year Students

Authors

AM Aramati Casper,Rebecca A Atadero,A Rahman Abdallah,Tom Siller

Journal

Journal of Civil Engineering Education

Published Date

2024/4/1

Civil engineering education must be updated to keep pace with the profession and move past a culture of disengagement where technical work is considered separate from societal impact. Civil engineering students need to engage with diversity, equity, inclusion, and justice (DEIJ) so they can understand the differential impacts of engineering on individuals from different groups within society. We aim to encourage the transformation of civil engineering education to produce engineers who will be prepared to meaningfully engage with society and advance justice in their future professional roles by providing examples of pedagogical change and analyzing student responses. In this study, we implemented new course assignments in an introductory civil engineering course and a Civil Engineering Materials course. In the introductory assignment, students were taught to draw systems models and asked to consider …

“It’s completely erasure”: A Qualitative Exploration of Experiences of Transgender, Nonbinary, Gender Nonconforming, and Questioning Students in Biology Courses

Authors

AM Aramati Casper,Nico Rebolledo,A Kelly Lane,Luke Jude,Sarah L Eddy

Journal

CBE—Life Sciences Education

Published Date

2022

Biology is the study of the diversity of life, which includes diversity in sex, gender, and sexual, romantic, and related orientations. However, a small body of literature suggests that undergraduate biology courses focus on only a narrow representation of this diversity (binary sexes, heterosexual orientations, etc.). In this study, we interviewed students with queer genders to understand the messages about sex, gender, and orientation they encountered in biology and the impact of these messages on them. We found five overarching themes in these interviews. Students described two narratives about sex, gender, and orientation in their biology classes that made biology implicitly exclusionary. These narratives harmed students by impacting their sense of belonging, career preparation, and interest in biology content. However, students employed a range of resilience strategies to resist these harms. Finally, students …

The impact of emergency remote learning on students in engineering and computer science in the United States: An analysis of four universities

Authors

AM Aramati Casper,Karen E Rambo‐Hernandez,Seoyeon Park,Rebecca A Atadero

Journal

Journal of Engineering Education

Published Date

2022/7

Background In Spring 2020, the COVID‐19 pandemic sent universities into emergency remote education. The pandemic has been disruptive but offers the opportunity to learn about ways to support students in other situations where abrupt changes to teaching and learning are necessary. Purpose/Hypothesis We described the responses of engineering and computer science students to a series of prompts about their experiences with remote learning. Design/Method Data about students' remote learning experiences were collected from undergraduate engineering and computer science students at four different universities through an end‐of‐semester survey. Descriptive statistics were calculated, and qualitative responses were analyzed using qualitative content analysis through the lenses of master narrative theory and sociocultural theory. Results Student responses revealed how their individual …

Leveraging Sustainability to Teach About Social Justice in Civil Engineering Curricula

Authors

Tom Siller,Rebecca A Atadero,AM Casper,Christina H Paguyo

Journal

IJEE International Journal of Engineering Education

Published Date

2022/6

Sustainability is a vital interdisciplinary concept to address within engineering education. Furthermore, the natural connections that exist between sustainability and social justice provide an optimal opportunity to integrate both into curricula. We argue that engineering curricula ought to include sustainability and social justice so future engineers are trained to understand both societal and technical implications of their work, while acknowledging the challenges engineering faculty may face in conceptualizing social justice or social sustainability. We then highlight how new sustainable design rating systems, such as Envision and The Living Building Challenge, embed inclusion and social justice into their ratings and how these sustainability rating systems can help engineering faculty bring social justice into their classrooms in ways that meaningfully link to engineering content. Finally, we present two examples of how sustainability and social justice can be incorporated into the civil engineering curriculum through inclusive pedagogy and new curricula: 1) a semester-long effort to document, design, and improve the inclusive pedagogical practices in a first-year engineering course that included the theme of sustainability throughout much of the class meetings; and 2) a new assignment about the Envision rating system and the societal implications of rebuilding a major component of regional infrastructure. We conclude with recommendations that other instructors can use to begin incorporating social justice in their courses.

Revealing the queer-spectrum in STEM through robust demographic data collection in undergraduate engineering and computer science courses at four institutions

Authors

AM Aramati Casper,Rebecca A Atadero,Linda C Fuselier

Journal

Plos one

Published Date

2022/3/10

Queer identities are often ignored in diversity initiatives, yet there is a growing body of research that describes notable heterosexist and gender-normative expectations in STEM that lead to unsupportive and discriminatory environments and to the lower persistence of queer individuals. Research on the experiences of queer-spectrum individuals is limited by current demographic practices. In surveys that are queer-inclusive there is no consensus on best practices, and individuals with queer genders and queer sexual, romantic, and related orientations are often lumped together in a general category (e.g. LGBTQ+). We developed two queer-inclusive demographics questions and administered them as part of a larger study in undergraduate engineering and computer science classes (n = 3698), to determine which of three survey types for gender (conventional, queered, open-ended) provided the most robust data and compared responses to national data to determine if students with queer genders and/or queer sexual, romantic, and related orientations were underrepresented in engineering and computer science programs. The gender survey with queer-identity options provided the most robust data, as measured by higher response rates and relatively high rates of disclosing queer identities. The conventional survey (male, female, other) had significantly fewer students disclose queer identities, and the open-ended survey had a significantly higher non-response rate. Allowing for multiple responses on the survey was important: 78% of those with queer gender identities and 9% of those with queer sexual, romantic and related orientations …

Teaching the Socially-Situated Nature of Climate Change Science in Technical STEM Courses: A Hurricane Katrina Case Study

Authors

Aramati Casper,Atadero Rebecca,Tom Siller

Journal

Authorea Preprints

Published Date

2022/11/21

To address climate change, social issues need to be integrated in geoscience-related STEM research and curriculum. However, social issues are often ignored in STEM fields, even though STEM practices are usually implicitly rooted in inequitable values and practices. A previous study showed that some students do not see the relevance of diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) activities when they are presented as separate from technical content, and some students argued that social content was irrelevant or inappropriate in a technical STEM course. Some engineering faculty have identified the lack of curriculum as a barrier to integrating the socially embedded nature of STEM into their introductory courses. Therefore, we developed a case that addresses social issues such as race, class, and gender in relationship to the social and environmental characteristics of New Orleans and its built environment. The case …

Surprises along the Path toward Equity in Engineering and Computer Science Education

Authors

Rebecca Atadero,Jody Paul,Robin Hensel,Christopher Griffin,Ronald Delyser,Anne Marie Casper,Melissa Morris,Christina Paguyo,Scott Leutenegger,Karen Rambo-Hernandez

Published Date

2022/8/23

The Partnership for Equity: STEM (P4E) is a collaborative project funded by the NSF IUSE program. Four partner institutions have been working together for the past five years to develop, implement, and assess curriculum activities to enlighten students attending required undergraduate engineering and computer science courses about the relevance and importance of diversity, equity, and inclusion to the fields of engineering and computer science. As the P4E project nears completion, we use this poster session and accompanying paper to reflect on what we have learned during the past five years. We focus on the surprises we encountered during the course of the project in the hopes that the pleasant surprises can be replicated with intention and the unpleasant surprises avoided by others who travel a similar path." Surprise" is a personal emotion in response to something unexpected, thus this reaction varies with a priori held beliefs. For this paper we decided to present verbatim reflections from project team members. This unique format allows us to enact some of the diversity and inclusion lessons we have tried to teach students over the past five years. The format also acknowledges that while none of the surprises documented here were in fact surprising to all the authors, individually we each had experiences that violated our expectations.

Linking engineering students’ professional identity development to diversity and working inclusively in technical courses

Authors

AM Aramati Casper,Rebecca A Atadero,Amir Hedayati-Mehdiabadi,Daniel W Baker

Journal

Journal of Civil Engineering Education

Published Date

2021/10/1

Despite growing efforts, diversity, equity, and inclusion initiatives have yet to address long-standing engineering participation disparities. Often, diversity and inclusion issues, along with other societal challenges, are perceived as unrelated to engineering. Conversely, engineering as currently practiced and taught is embedded in dominant culture norms that are frequently invisible to the majority of the students and faculty. One strategy to shift this erroneous “neutral” perspective is to integrate diversity and inclusion into engineering curricula. Using inclusive professional identities as a theoretical lens, we developed an activity that incorporates diversity and inclusion into the technical content of Engineering Mechanics: Statics. Using thematic analysis, we found that students’ responses to prompts about their identities, engineering as a profession, and their perceived learning revealed two primary themes: teamwork …

Leveraging changes in engineering and computer science curricula to engender inclusive professional identities in students

Authors

Blaine Austin Pedersen,Robin AM Hensel,Sumaia Ali Raisa,Rebecca A Atadero,AM Aramati Casper,Ronald R DeLyser,Christopher D Griffin,Scott T Leutenegger,Melissa Lynn Morris,Christina Paguyo,Jody Paul,Seoyeon Park,Karen E Rambo-Hernandez,Breigh Nonte Roszelle

Published Date

2021/7/26

To identify and solve the wicked problems [1] our society faces, science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) enterprises need a heterogeneous constellation of perspectives, mindsets, and expertise. Diverse teams are appealing because of their documented capacity to outperform groups selected based only on ability when facing difficult challenges [2]. However, organizational theorists note that equipping people with the skills necessary to work together productively on teams composed of diverse members remains a challenge [3]. Additionally, the culture of engineering and computer science, in particular, is often unwelcoming toward those with diverse backgrounds, further disrupting efforts to form capable teams in those STEM enterprises.Historically, many diversity-focused interventions have centered on “fixing” the marginalized minority to cope with the unwelcoming cultures in which they are situated. Instead, the interventions in this project attempt to change the culture such that it respects and values diversity in all of its forms.

Human Dimensions: Journey and Future of the Inclusive Ecology Section

Authors

Anne Marie Aramati Casper,Kennedy F Rubert‐Nason,Wilnelia Recart,Kylea Rose Garces

Journal

The Bulletin of the Ecological Society of America

Published Date

2021/7

The Inclusive Ecology Section was formed in 2016 in response to concerns expressed by Ecological Society of America (ESA) members regarding matters of inclusion in the structures within ESA, as well as the evolving landscape of socio-environmental conflicts and the developing climate crisis. The Section’s mission is to provide resources and support for all ecologists, regardless of race, sex, physical or mental ability or difference, gender identity or expression, sexual orientation, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, culture or subculture, national origin, marital status, parental status, politics, religion, level of education, or age. Initial efforts focused on fostering collaboration, diversity, inclusion, and equity within ESA and in members’ workplaces, and strengthening connections between ecologists and communities outside of ESA.In 2015, Elita Baldridge first articulated the vision for the Inclusive Ecology Section. Six years later, we continue to grow as a Section through reflective practices in which we focus on applying the Section’s vision to current and emerging challenges (Fig. 1). After Elita Baldridge drafted a Section vision and bylaws and collected the 50 signatures required for the Section to be approved by ESA’s Council in 2015, her career path took her outside of ESA. Kennedy “Ned” Rubert-Nason took on informal leadership of the nascent Section in 2016. Through bulletin board posts, announcements at the human-dimensions-related sections’ mega-mixer, and informal networking, Rubert-Nason brought together a group of interested people to convene the inaugural business meeting at the 2016 ESA annual meeting in Fort Lauderdale …

Ecologist engagement in translational science is imperative for building resilience to global change threats

Authors

Kennedy Rubert-Nason,AM Aramati Casper,Matt Jurjonas,Caitlin Mandeville,Rebecca Potter,Kirsten Schwarz

Journal

Rethinking Ecology

Published Date

2021/4/23

The causes and consequences of global change are well-documented, as are mitigation and adaptation strategies. However, human actions continue to fail in building adequate socio-ecological resilience to the accelerating threats of global change. Translational science, which focuses on connecting scientific research to human benefits, is imperative to building resilience to a confluence of global change threats because it brings the implications of theory and empirical research into practice. Translational ecology, an approach to knowledge co-creation that is grounded in equitable, inclusive, empathetic, and just partnerships among administrators, policy makers, scholars, practitioners, and the public, has immense potential to bring about the rapid and expansive social, ecological and political changes necessary to build resilience to global change threats. Here, we articulate a need for greater engagement of ecologists and other professionals in translational initiatives addressing seven major resilience building challenges, and propose a framework that lowers barriers to participation and promotes stronger relationships among stakeholders. We recommend specific actions that ecologists can take based on their situation, as well as evidence and demonstrated need, to foster resilience building through their contributions to communication, policy, education, knowledge creation, leadership, and service as role models. We conclude with an urgent call for expansive engagement of ecologists and other professionals in initiatives that combat misinformation, partner equitably with communities in knowledge creation, cultivate empathy and …

Incorporation of JEDI content into an undergraduate hydrology course

Authors

Aramati Casper,Aditi Bhaskar,Atadero Rebecca

Journal

AGU Fall Meeting Abstracts

Published Date

2021/12

Social justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion (JEDI) content are vital, yet often left out, components of STEM education. STEM content and practices are socially-situated and integrating JEDI content is important to prepare future STEM practitioners to grapple with current and future challenges. Hydrology courses are a prime location to integrate JEDI content into the curriculum as water resources are integral to environmental justice. It is important to integrate JEDI content directly into technical content, as previous research demonstrates that some students argue social content is irrelevant or inappropriate in a technical STEM course if JEDI-type activities are presented as separate from technical content. To help bridge the perceived technical-social divide in engineering curriculum we developed materials to integrate JEDI content, including race, class, and historical discriminatory laws, into the content of a junior …

A tool for measuring ecological literacy: coupled human-ecosystem interactions

Authors

Anne Marie A Casper,María E Fernández-Giménez,Meena M Balgopal

Journal

The Journal of Agricultural Education and Extension

Published Date

2021/1/1

Purpose: Ecological and natural resource management (NRM) decisions have far-reaching implications for global ecological change. Because beliefs influence behaviors, it is vital that decision-makers’ beliefs reflect the shift to include humans as an integrated component of ecosystems. Our study, grounded in socio-cultural theory, analyzed how undergraduate participants situated humans in relation to ecosystems and describes the continuum we developed to characterize individuals’ conceptions.Design/Methodology/Approach: To develop a grounded theory we analyzed participants’ perceptions of human-environment relationships through semi-structured interviews. We used both triangulation of codes through student course artifacts and inter-rater coding to establish trustworthiness of findings.Findings: We present a continuum of coupled human-ecosystems conceptions developed from the participants …

Valuing diversity and enacting inclusion in engineering (VDEIE): Validity evidence for a new scale

Authors

Karen E Rambo-Hernandez,Rebecca A Atadero,M Morris,S Park,AM Casper,BA Pedersen,J Schwartz,R Hensel

Journal

IJEE International Journal of Engineering Education

Published Date

2021/12

The purpose of this paper is to detail the initial validation of a scale to assess engineering students’ attitudes toward the value of diversity in engineering and their intentions to enact inclusive behaviors. In study 1, we administered the scale four times. We subjected the first administration to exploratory factor analysis (EFA), and the remaining three administrations to both confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and tests of longitudinal measurement invariance (LMI). All tests indicated strong evidence for the internal structure of the factor structure of the survey. The four factors were: engineers should value diversity to (a) fulfill a greater purpose and (b) serve customers better; and engineers should (c) challenge discriminatory behavior and (d) promote a healthy work environment. In study 2, we again assessed the structure of the data as described in study 1 and then used the scale to assess potential differences between undergraduate students who participated in activities designed to promote diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) (n=116) and those who did not (n=137). Students in the intervention classes demonstrated a small statistically significant increase in their intention to promote a healthy team environment in reference to the comparison classes. No differences were observed between the classes on the other factors. Future directions and implications are discussed.

Outperforming yet undervalued: Undergraduate women in STEM

Authors

Brittany Bloodhart,Meena M Balgopal,Anne Marie A Casper,Laura B Sample McMeeking,Emily V Fischer

Journal

Plos one

Published Date

2020/6/25

In spite of efforts to increase gender diversity across many science fields, women continue to encounter beliefs that they lack ability and talent. Undergraduate education is a critical time when peer influence may alter choice of majors and careers for women interested in science. Even in life science courses, in which women outnumber men, gender biases that emerge in peer-to-peer interactions during coursework may detract from women’s interest and progress. This is the first study of which we are aware to document that women are outperforming men in both physical and life science undergraduate courses at the same institution, while simultaneously continuing to be perceived as less-able students. This is problematic because undergraduate women may not be able to escape gender-ability stereotypes even when they are outperforming men, which has important implications for 1) the recognition of women’s achievements among their peers in undergraduate education and 2) retention of women in STEM disciplines and careers.

Partnership for Equity: Engaging with Faculty to Cultivate Inclusive Professional Identities for Engineers and Computer Scientists

Authors

Seoyeon Park,Rebecca A Atadero,Anne Marie Aramati Casper,Karen E Rambo-Hernandez,Jody Paul,Melissa Lynn Morris,Christopher Douglas Griffin,Ronald R DeLyser,Christina Paguyo,Scott T Leutenegger

Published Date

2020/6/22

The Partnership for Equity (P4E) is funded through the NSF IUSE (Improving Undergraduate STEM Education) program. The goal of the project is to cultivate inclusive professional identities in undergraduate engineering and computer science students. The project team defines inclusive professional identities in terms of four key features:(a) the necessary technical knowledge, skills, and abilities to work in their chosen field;(b) an appreciation for how all kinds of diversity strengthen engineering and computer science as disciplines;(c) knowledge of how to act in inclusive ways and create inclusive environments within their fields; and (d) preparation to consider the impact on a diverse array of people using or otherwise influenced by engineering and computer science endeavors. The project defines diversity in a broad sense including different life experiences, demographic characteristics, problem-solving approaches and personalities, while also placing some emphasis on the experience of populations historically underrepresented in engineering and computer science.

How guest experts tell stories about environmental socio-scientific issues in an undergraduate class

Authors

Anne Marie A Casper,Meena M Balgopal

Journal

International Journal of Science Education

Published Date

2020/6/12

To broaden perspectives presented in undergraduate courses, instructors often invite guest speakers, yet there is limited research on students’ perceptions of guest speakers and the potential influence they may have on student learning. In this exploratory study, we describe how senior undergraduate students, in a natural resource management capstone course, perceived guest speakers, who were invited to lecture on environmental socio-scientific issues. Through qualitative content analysis (guided by frame theory) of student interviews, student artifacts, and transcripts of lectures, we determined that, compared to other speakers, ‘memorable’ speakers (1) told stories, (2) evoked emotion, and (3) either explained theory only after sharing cases studies or intermittently explained theory while sharing a case (rather than beginning with theoretical explanations followed by case studies). Because storytelling was a …

Revealing the queer-spectrum in STEM: Undergraduate student responses to diverse gender identity and sexual orientation demographics questions

Authors

AM Casper,Katherine Ray King,Rebecca Atadero,Linda C Fuselier

Published Date

2020

Heterosexist and gender-normative expectations prevalent in STEM education may lead to inequity for queer-spectrum individuals1-4 Queer-spectrum (neither cisgender nor heterosexual) people in STEM experience under-representation5 and the following:• Exclusion from networking and resources; harrassment6• Competence questioned; more negative work environment6•“Silent”(“irrelevant”) identity–not to be discussed7• Decreased sense of belonging8• Marginalization and devaluing; decreased professional success6

See List of Professors in A. M. Aramati Casper University(Colorado State University)

A. M. Aramati Casper FAQs

What is A. M. Aramati Casper's h-index at Colorado State University?

The h-index of A. M. Aramati Casper has been 9 since 2020 and 9 in total.

What are A. M. Aramati Casper's top articles?

The articles with the titles of

Bringing Social Justice Context into Civil Engineering Courses for First-Year and Third-Year Students

“It’s completely erasure”: A Qualitative Exploration of Experiences of Transgender, Nonbinary, Gender Nonconforming, and Questioning Students in Biology Courses

The impact of emergency remote learning on students in engineering and computer science in the United States: An analysis of four universities

Leveraging Sustainability to Teach About Social Justice in Civil Engineering Curricula

Revealing the queer-spectrum in STEM through robust demographic data collection in undergraduate engineering and computer science courses at four institutions

Teaching the Socially-Situated Nature of Climate Change Science in Technical STEM Courses: A Hurricane Katrina Case Study

Surprises along the Path toward Equity in Engineering and Computer Science Education

Linking engineering students’ professional identity development to diversity and working inclusively in technical courses

...

are the top articles of A. M. Aramati Casper at Colorado State University.

What are A. M. Aramati Casper's research interests?

The research interests of A. M. Aramati Casper are: Ecology Education, Forest Ecology, Systems Thinking, Social Justice, Diversity

What is A. M. Aramati Casper's total number of citations?

A. M. Aramati Casper has 316 citations in total.

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