A. Kelly Lane

A. Kelly Lane

University of Minnesota-Twin Cities

H-index: 11

North America-United States

About A. Kelly Lane

A. Kelly Lane, With an exceptional h-index of 11 and a recent h-index of 10 (since 2020), a distinguished researcher at University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, specializes in the field of graduate student development, faculty development, institutional change.

His recent articles reflect a diverse array of research interests and contributions to the field:

Equitable Instructor Assessment Changes Amid COVID-19 Pandemic

STEM education institutional change projects: examining enacted approaches through the lens of the Four Categories of Change Strategies Model

“Out of my control”: science undergraduates report mental health concerns and inconsistent conditions when using remote proctoring software

Social networks and instructional reform in STEM: The Teaching-Research Nexus

Context and content of teaching conversations: exploring how to promote sharing of innovative teaching knowledge between science faculty

Development of the Cooperative Adoption Factors Instrument to measure factors associated with instructional practice in the context of institutional change

Oral Presentation: Biology Graduate Student Experiences with COVID-19 and Social Unrest

Evaluating the representation of community colleges in biology education research publications following a call to action

A. Kelly Lane Information

University

University of Minnesota-Twin Cities

Position

___

Citations(all)

427

Citations(since 2020)

385

Cited By

128

hIndex(all)

11

hIndex(since 2020)

10

i10Index(all)

11

i10Index(since 2020)

11

Email

University Profile Page

University of Minnesota-Twin Cities

A. Kelly Lane Skills & Research Interests

graduate student development

faculty development

institutional change

Top articles of A. Kelly Lane

Equitable Instructor Assessment Changes Amid COVID-19 Pandemic

Authors

Todd Lamb,Emily P Driessen,Abby E Beatty,Rachel Youngblood,Abby Esco,Sehoya Cotner,Catherine Creech,Abby Grace Drake,Sheritta Fagbodun,Kristen S Hobbs,A Kelly Lane,Erin Larson,Sophie J McCoy,Seth Thompson,Cissy J Ballen

Journal

Journal of College Science Teaching

Published Date

2024/3/3

The coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak mandated a rapid transition to online classes with little warning. Previous literature studying the effects of this sudden shift demonstrated enormous impacts on instructors and students. However, the details concerning science instructor assessment choices during this time are less clear. We asked biology instructors to reflect on the changes they made to their assessments of student learning during the emergency transition to remote instruction in spring 2020 and whether the potential changes were motivated by equity concerns. We also asked instructors to describe the assessment changes they intended to keep in future semesters. Through quantitative and qualitative analyses, we found that instructors removed forms of assessment more often than they added them, and the most common changes included how instructors administered exams and engaged students through …

STEM education institutional change projects: examining enacted approaches through the lens of the Four Categories of Change Strategies Model

Authors

S Feola,JE Lewis,JD McAlpin,LB Prevost,J Skvoretz,M Stains,BA Couch,B Earl,JP Ziker,AK Lane,SE Shadle

Journal

International Journal of STEM Education

Published Date

2023/11/22

BackgroundEnacting STEM education reform is a complex task and there are a variety of approaches that might be selected by change agents. When working on an institutional change project to impact multiple parts of the STEM education system, teams of change agents may select multiple strategies and tactics to enact at one time and over multiple years of a project. However, the literature lacks studies which document and analyze strategies and tactics used by change project teams in a way that can be useful for other change agents. The current study seeks to fill this gap by investigating National Science Foundation-funded change initiatives at three public research universities focused on encouraging the adoption of evidenced-based instructional practices by STEM faculty in order to understand the strategies used within and across projects.ResultsQualitative framework analysis using the lens of the …

“Out of my control”: science undergraduates report mental health concerns and inconsistent conditions when using remote proctoring software

Authors

Annika Pokorny,Cissy J Ballen,Abby Grace Drake,Emily P Driessen,Sheritta Fagbodun,Brian Gibbens,Jeremiah A Henning,Sophie J McCoy,Seth K Thompson,Charles G Willis,A Kelly Lane

Journal

International Journal for Educational Integrity

Published Date

2023/11/15

Efforts to discourage academic misconduct in online learning environments frequently include the use of remote proctoring services. While these services are relatively commonplace in undergraduate science courses, there are open questions about students’ remote assessment environments and their concerns related to remote proctoring services. Using a survey distributed to 11 undergraduate science courses engaging in remote instruction at three American, public, research-focused institutions during the spring of 2021, we found that the majority of undergraduate students reported testing in suboptimal environments. Students’ concerns about remote proctoring services were closely tied to technological difficulties, fear of being wrongfully accused of cheating, and negative impacts on mental health. Our results suggest that remote proctoring services can create and perpetuate inequitable assessment …

Social networks and instructional reform in STEM: The Teaching-Research Nexus

Authors

John Skvoretz,Katherine Kappelman,Ariel Marcy,Jacob D McAlpin,Jennifer E Lewis,John P Ziker,Karl Mertens,Brittnee Earl,Susan E Shadle,Brian A Couch,Stephanie Feola,Luanna B Prevost,A Kelly Lane,Blake Whitt,Marilyne Stains

Journal

Innovative Higher Education

Published Date

2023/8

Instructional reform in STEM aims for the widespread adoption of evidence based instructional practices (EBIPS), practices that implement active learning. Research recognizes that faculty social networks regarding discussion or advice about teaching may matter to such efforts. But teaching is not the only priority for university faculty – meeting research expectations is at least as important and, often, more consequential for tenure and promotion decisions. We see value in understanding how research networks, based on discussion and advice about research matters, relate to teaching networks to see if and how such networks could advance instructional reform efforts. Our research examines data from three departments (biology, chemistry, and geosciences) at three universities that had recently received funding to enhance adoption of EBIPs in STEM fields. We evaluate exponential random graph models of the teaching network …

Context and content of teaching conversations: exploring how to promote sharing of innovative teaching knowledge between science faculty

Authors

A Kelly Lane,Brittnee Earl,Stephanie Feola,Jennifer E Lewis,Jacob D McAlpin,Karl Mertens,Susan E Shadle,John Skvoretz,John P Ziker,Marilyne Stains,Brian A Couch,Luanna B Prevost

Journal

International Journal of STEM Education

Published Date

2022/8/4

BackgroundChange strategies may leverage interpersonal relationships and conversations to spread teaching innovations among science faculty. Knowledge sharing refers to the process by which individuals transfer information and thereby spread innovative ideas within an organization. We use knowledge sharing as a lens for identifying factors that encourage productive teaching-related conversations between individuals, characterizing the context and content of these discussions, and understanding how peer interactions may shape instructional practices. In this study, we interview 19 science faculty using innovative teaching practices about the teaching-focused conversations they have with different discussion partners.ResultsThis qualitative study describes characteristics of the relationship between discussion partners, what they discuss with respect to teaching, the amount of help-seeking that occurs, and …

Development of the Cooperative Adoption Factors Instrument to measure factors associated with instructional practice in the context of institutional change

Authors

Jacob D McAlpin,John P Ziker,John Skvoretz,Brian A Couch,Brittnee Earl,Stephanie Feola,A Kelly Lane,Karl Mertens,Luanna B Prevost,Susan E Shadle,Marilyne Stains,Jennifer E Lewis

Journal

International Journal of STEM Education

Published Date

2022/7/16

BackgroundMany institutional and departmentally focused change efforts have sought to improve teaching in STEM through the promotion of evidence-based instructional practices (EBIPs). Even with these efforts, EBIPs have not become the predominant mode of teaching in many STEM departments. To better understand institutional change efforts and the barriers to EBIP implementation, we developed the Cooperative Adoption Factors Instrument (CAFI) to probe faculty member characteristics beyond demographic attributes at the individual level. The CAFI probes multiple constructs related to institutional change including perceptions of the degree of mutual advantage of taking an action (strategic complements), trust and interconnectedness among colleagues (interdependence), and institutional attitudes toward teaching (climate).ResultsFrom data collected across five STEM fields at three large public research …

Oral Presentation: Biology Graduate Student Experiences with COVID-19 and Social Unrest

Authors

Joshua W Reid,A Kelly Lane,Zoe Koth

Journal

16th Annual Tennessee STEM Education Research Conference January 13-14, 2022

Published Date

2022/1/13

During the 2020-2021 academic year, university stakeholders have dealt with the impacts of the pandemic, as well as the transition to Emergency Remote Teaching (ERT; Al-Taweel et al., 2020; Hodges et al., 2020), and the impacts of social justice movements occurring across the United States. While there has been some reporting on how the COVID-19 pandemic has affected medical students (Ahmed et al., 2020), there is a lack of research focused on the pandemic-related and social justice-related needs of graduate students, who are key contributors to the university community through their research, teaching, mentorship, and service (eg, Connolly et al., 2016; Nicklow et al., 2007; Sundberg et al., 2005). In this study, we sought to illuminate pandemic-related and social justice-related needs of biology graduate students, based on their experiences of events that transpired in 2020. Two research questions …

Evaluating the representation of community colleges in biology education research publications following a call to action

Authors

Catherine Creech,Jan Just,Sarah Hammarlund,Cleo E Rolle,Ngawang Y Gonsar,Alyssa Olson,Nikaila Campbell,Karissa Mennes,Cecilia Adoradio,Paula Soneral,Sharday Ewell,Clay Mazur,A Kelly Lane,James Hewlett,Sehoya Cotner

Published Date

2022

Interest in biology education research (BER) has been growing over the last two decades, yet few BER publications focus on community colleges, which serve a large percentage of the undergraduate student population and a majority of those students who identify with historically underserved groups. In this paper, we define community college biology education research (CC BER) as publications with a community college faculty member as an author, publications with a community college study context or a focus on community college biology teaching and learning, and publications that use community college students as a source of data. We conducted a literature review to quantify how CC BER has progressed since initial calls for broadening participation by recording the number of CC BER publications in seven prominent journals between 2016 and 2020. Our formal analysis of peer-reviewed BER literature …

Close to open—Factors that hinder and promote open science in ecology research and education

Authors

Christian B Strømme,A Kelly Lane,Aud H Halbritter,Elizabeth Law,Chloe R Nater,Erlend B Nilsen,Grace D Boutouli,Dagmar D Egelkraut,Richard J Telford,Vigdis Vandvik,Sehoya H Cotner

Journal

Plos one

Published Date

2022/12/21

The Open Science (OS) movement is rapidly gaining traction among policy-makers, research funders, scientific journals and individual scientists. Despite these tendencies, the pace of implementing OS throughout the scientific process and across the scientific community remains slow. Thus, a better understanding of the conditions that affect OS engagement, and in particular, of how practitioners learn, use, conduct and share research openly can guide those seeking to implement OS more broadly. We surveyed participants at an OS workshop hosted by the Living Norway Ecological Data Network in 2020 to learn how they perceived OS and its importance in their research, supervision and teaching. Further, we wanted to know what OS practices they had encountered in their education and what they saw as hindering or helping their engagement with OS. The survey contained scaled-response and open-ended questions, allowing for a mixed-methods approach. We obtained survey responses from 60 out of 128 workshop participants (47%). Responses indicated that usage and sharing of open data and code, as well as open access publication, were the most frequent OS practices. Only a minority of respondents reported having encountered OS in their formal education. A majority also viewed OS as less important in their teaching than in their research and supervisory roles. The respondents’ suggestions for what would facilitate greater OS engagement in the future included knowledge, guidelines, and resources, but also social and structural support. These are aspects that could be strengthened by promoting explicit implementation of OS …

“It’s completely erasure”: a qualitative exploration of experiences of transgender, nonbinary, gender nonconforming, and questioning students in biology courses

Authors

AM Aramati Casper,Nico Rebolledo,A Kelly Lane,Luke Jude,Sarah L Eddy

Journal

CBE—Life Sciences Education

Published Date

2022

Biology is the study of the diversity of life, which includes diversity in sex, gender, and sexual, romantic, and related orientations. However, a small body of literature suggests that undergraduate biology courses focus on only a narrow representation of this diversity (binary sexes, heterosexual orientations, etc.). In this study, we interviewed students with queer genders to understand the messages about sex, gender, and orientation they encountered in biology and the impact of these messages on them. We found five overarching themes in these interviews. Students described two narratives about sex, gender, and orientation in their biology classes that made biology implicitly exclusionary. These narratives harmed students by impacting their sense of belonging, career preparation, and interest in biology content. However, students employed a range of resilience strategies to resist these harms. Finally, students …

Are synchronous chats a silver lining of emergency remote instruction? Text-based chatting is disproportionately favored by women in a non-majors introductory biology course

Authors

Rachael D Robnett,Cissy J Ballen,Sheritta Fagbodun,Kelly Lane,Sophie J McCoy,Lecia Robinson,Ebony I Weems,Sehoya Cotner

Journal

Plos one

Published Date

2022/10/19

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has led to a reimagining of many aspects of higher education, including how instructors interact with their students and how they encourage student participation. Text-based chatting during synchronous remote instruction is a simple form of student-student and student-instructor interaction. The importance of student participation has been documented, as have clear disparities in participation between those well-represented and those under-represented in science disciplines. Thus, we conducted an investigation into who is texting, what students are texting, and how these texts align with course content. We focused on two sections of a large-enrollment, introductory biology class offered remotely during Fall 2020. Using an analysis of in-class chatting, in combination with student survey responses, we find that text-based chatting suggests not only a high level of student engagement, but a type of participation that is disproportionately favored by women. Given the multiple lines of evidence indicating that women typically under-participate in their science courses, any vehicle that counters this trend merits further exploration. We conclude with suggestions for further research, and ideas for carrying forward text-based chatting in the post-COVID-19, in-person classroom.

Am I getting through? Surveying students on what messages they recall from the first day of STEM classes

Authors

Clara L Meaders,Lillian G Senn,Brian A Couch,A Kelly Lane,Marilyne Stains,MacKenzie R Stetzer,Erin Vinson,Michelle K Smith

Journal

International Journal of STEM Education

Published Date

2021/12

Background The first day of class helps students learn about what to expect from their instructors and courses. Messaging used by instructors, which varies in content and approach on the first day, shapes classroom social dynamics and can affect subsequent learning in a course. Prior work established the non-content Instructor Talk Framework to describe the language that instructors use to create learning environments, but little is known about the extent to which students detect those messages. In this study, we paired first day classroom observation data with results from student surveys to measure how readily students in introductory STEM courses detect non-content Instructor Talk. Results To learn more about the instructor and student first day experiences, we studied 11 introductory STEM courses at two different institutions. The classroom …

Applying And Promoting Open Science In Ecology-Surveyed Drivers And Challenges

Authors

Christian B Strømme,A Kelly Lane,Aud H Halbritter,Elizabeth Law,Chloe R Nater,Erlend B Nilsen,Grace D Boutouli,Dagmar D Egelkraut,Richard J Telford,Vigdis Vandvik,Sehoya H Cotner

Journal

bioRxiv

Published Date

2021/10/12

Open Science (OS) comprises a variety of practices and principles that are broadly intended to improve the quality and transparency of research, and the concept is gaining traction. Since OS has multiple facets and still lacks a unifying definition, it may be interpreted quite differently among practitioners. Moreover, successfully implementing OS broadly throughout science requires a better understanding of the conditions that facilitate or hinder OS engagement, and in particular, how practitioners learn OS in the first place. We addressed these issues by surveying OS practitioners that attended a workshop hosted by the Living Norway Ecological Data Network in 2020. The survey contained scaled-response and open-ended questions, allowing for a mixed-methods approach. Out of 128 registered participants we obtained survey responses from 60 individuals. Responses indicated usage and sharing of data and code, as well as open access publications, as the OS aspects most frequently engaged with. Men and those affiliated with academic institutions reported more frequent engagement with OS than women and those with other affiliations. When it came to learning OS practices, only a minority of respondents reported having encountered OS in their own formal education. Consistent with this, a majority of respondents viewed OS as less important in their teaching than in their research and supervision. Even so, many of the respondents’ suggestions for what would help or hinder individual OS engagement included more knowledge, guidelines, resource availability and social and structural support; indicating that formal instruction can facilitate …

Adjusting Expectations: The Impact of 2020 Campus Closures on Advisors’ Approaches to Graduate Student Mentorship

Authors

Zoe Koth,A. Kelly Lane

Journal

Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education

Published Date

2021/3

The spring 2020 campus closures due to the COVID-19 pandemic may have posed particular challenges related to the mentorship of science graduate students. In this study, science faculty mentors from one U.S. university report on potential delays to degree completion and their expectations of their mentees during this time. Nearly half of the faculty advisors surveyed expected their graduate student mentees to experience delayed time to graduation. Respondents also described making an effort to support their mentees through providing encouragement and identifying research-related goals students could complete remotely. One-quarter of respondents stated that they were not altering their expectations for their mentees. The respondents who did report having altered expectations varied between altering their immediate expectations and changing their overall expectations for degree completion. These …

What questions are on the minds of STEM undergraduate students and how can they be addressed?

Authors

Clara L Meaders,Michelle K Smith,Timothy Boester,Anne Bracy,Brian A Couch,Abby G Drake,Saima Farooq,Bashir Khoda,Cynthia Kinsland,A Kelly Lane,Sarah E Lindahl,William H Livingston,Ayesha Maliwal Bundy,Amber McCormick,Anya I Morozov,Jennifer L Newell-Caito,Katharine J Ruskin,Mark A Sarvary,Marilyne Stains,Justin R St. Juliana,Stephanie R Thomas,Cindy van Es,Erin L Vinson,Maren N Vitousek,Mackenzie R Stetzer

Journal

Frontiers in Education

Published Date

2021/2/22

Addressing common student questions in introductory STEM courses early in the term is one way that instructors can ensure that their students have all been presented with information about how to succeed in their courses. However, categorizing student questions and identifying evidence-based resources to address student questions takes time, and instructors may not be able to easily collect and respond to student questions at the beginning of every course. To help faculty effectively anticipate and respond to student questions, we 1) administered surveys in multiple STEM courses to identify common student questions, 2) conducted a qualitative analysis to determine categories of student questions (e.g., what are best practices for studying, how can in- and out-of- course time be effectively used), and 3) collaboratively identified advice on how course instructors can answer these questions. Here, we share tips, evidence-based strategies, and resources from faculty that instructors can use to develop their own responses for students. We hope that educators can use these common student questions as a starting point to proactively address questions throughout the course and that the compiled resources will allow instructors to easily find materials that can be considered for their own courses.

Making a first impression: Exploring what instructors do and say on the first day of introductory STEM courses

Authors

A Kelly Lane,Clara L Meaders,J Kenny Shuman,MacKenzie R Stetzer,Erin L Vinson,Brian A Couch,Michelle K Smith,Marilyne Stains

Journal

CBE—Life Sciences Education

Published Date

2021

Student impressions formed during the first day of class can impact course satisfaction and performance. Despite its potential importance, little is known about how instructors format the first day of class. Here, we report on observations of the first day of class in 23 introductory science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) courses. We first described how introductory STEM instructors structure their class time by characterizing topics covered on the first day through inductive coding of class videos. We found that all instructors discussed policies and basic information. However, a cluster analysis revealed two groups of instructors who differed primarily in their level of STEM content coverage. We then coded the videos with the noncontent Instructor Talk framework, which organizes the statements instructors make unrelated to disciplinary content into several categories and subcategories. Instructors generally …

Innovative teaching knowledge stays with users

Authors

A Kelly Lane,Jacob D McAlpin,Brittnee Earl,Stephanie Feola,Jennifer E Lewis,Karl Mertens,Susan E Shadle,John Skvoretz,John P Ziker,Brian A Couch,Luanna B Prevost,Marilyne Stains

Journal

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Published Date

2020/9/15

Programs seeking to transform undergraduate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics courses often strive for participating faculty to share their knowledge of innovative teaching practices with other faculty in their home departments. Here, we provide interview, survey, and social network analyses revealing that faculty who use innovative teaching practices preferentially talk to each other, suggesting that greater steps are needed for information about innovative practices to reach faculty more broadly.

Fourteen recommendations to create a more inclusive environment for LGBTQ+ individuals in academic biology

Authors

Katelyn M Cooper,Anna Jo J Auerbach,Jordan D Bader,Amy S Beadles-Bohling,Jacqueline A Brashears,Erica Cline,Sarah L Eddy,Deanna B Elliott,Elijah Farley,Linda Fuselier,Heather M Heinz,Madison Irving,Tanya Josek,A Kelly Lane,Stanley M Lo,Jeffrey Maloy,Michelle Nugent,Erika Offerdahl,Juan Palacios-Moreno,Jorge Ramos,Joshua W Reid,Rachel A Sparks,Ashley L Waring,Mike Wilton,Cara Gormally,Sara E Brownell

Journal

CBE—Life Sciences Education

Published Date

2020

Individuals who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and otherwise nonstraight and/or non-cisgender (LGBTQ+) have often not felt welcome or represented in the biology community. Additionally, biology can present unique challenges for LGBTQ+ students because of the relationship between certain biology topics and their LGBTQ+ identities. Currently, there is no centralized set of guidelines to make biology learning environments more inclusive for LGBTQ+ individuals. Rooted in prior literature and the collective expertise of the authors who identify as members and allies of the LGBTQ+ community, we present a set of actionable recommendations to help biologists, biology educators, and biology education researchers be more inclusive of individuals with LGBTQ+ identities. These recommendations are intended to increase awareness of LGBTQ+ identities and spark conversations about …

Undergraduate Student Concerns in Introductory STEM Courses: What They Are, How They Change, and What Influences Them

Authors

Clara L Meaders,A Kelly Lane,Anya I Morozov,J Kenny Shuman,Emma S Toth,Marilyne Stains,MacKenzie R Stetzer,Erin Vinson,Brian A Couch,Michelle K Smith

Journal

Journal for STEM Education Research

Published Date

2020/7

Introductory STEM courses represent entry points into a major, and student experiences in these courses can affect both their persistence and success in STEM disciplines. Identifying course-based student concerns may help instructors detect negative perceptions, areas of struggle, and potential barriers to success. Using an open-response survey question, we identified 13 common concerns expressed by students in introductory STEM courses. We converted these student-generated concerns into closed-ended items that were administered at the beginning and middle of the semester to students in 22 introductory STEM course sections across three different institutions. Students were asked to reflect on each item on a scale from very concerned to not concerned. A subset of these concerns was used to create a summary score of course-based concern for each student. Overall levels of student concern …

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A. Kelly Lane FAQs

What is A. Kelly Lane's h-index at University of Minnesota-Twin Cities?

The h-index of A. Kelly Lane has been 10 since 2020 and 11 in total.

What are A. Kelly Lane's top articles?

The articles with the titles of

Equitable Instructor Assessment Changes Amid COVID-19 Pandemic

STEM education institutional change projects: examining enacted approaches through the lens of the Four Categories of Change Strategies Model

“Out of my control”: science undergraduates report mental health concerns and inconsistent conditions when using remote proctoring software

Social networks and instructional reform in STEM: The Teaching-Research Nexus

Context and content of teaching conversations: exploring how to promote sharing of innovative teaching knowledge between science faculty

Development of the Cooperative Adoption Factors Instrument to measure factors associated with instructional practice in the context of institutional change

Oral Presentation: Biology Graduate Student Experiences with COVID-19 and Social Unrest

Evaluating the representation of community colleges in biology education research publications following a call to action

...

are the top articles of A. Kelly Lane at University of Minnesota-Twin Cities.

What are A. Kelly Lane's research interests?

The research interests of A. Kelly Lane are: graduate student development, faculty development, institutional change

What is A. Kelly Lane's total number of citations?

A. Kelly Lane has 427 citations in total.

What are the co-authors of A. Kelly Lane?

The co-authors of A. Kelly Lane are Robert J Schmitz, Jessica Garb, Lexiang Ji, Evelyn Schwager, Matthew A Collin.

    Co-Authors

    H-index: 71
    Robert J Schmitz

    Robert J Schmitz

    University of Georgia

    H-index: 30
    Jessica Garb

    Jessica Garb

    University of Massachusetts Lowell

    H-index: 26
    Lexiang Ji

    Lexiang Ji

    University of Georgia

    H-index: 24
    Evelyn Schwager

    Evelyn Schwager

    University of Massachusetts Lowell

    H-index: 13
    Matthew A Collin

    Matthew A Collin

    University of California, Riverside

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