A. F. Brito

A. F. Brito

University of New Hampshire

H-index: 27

North America-United States

About A. F. Brito

A. F. Brito, With an exceptional h-index of 27 and a recent h-index of 23 (since 2020), a distinguished researcher at University of New Hampshire, specializes in the field of dairy nutrition, ruminant nutrition, enteric methane.

His recent articles reflect a diverse array of research interests and contributions to the field:

Feeding alfalfa-grass or red clover–grass mixture baleage: Effect on milk yield and composition, ruminal fermentation and microbiota taxa relative abundance, and nutrient …

Assessment of blood sampling time points to determine the relative bioavailability of ruminally protected methionine supplements using the plasma free amino acid dose-response …

Assessing forage research and education needs of organic dairy farms in the United States

Water Stress Influences Phytoestrogen Levels in Red Clover (Trifolium pratense) but Not Kura Clover (T. ambiguum)

Seaweed supplementation to organic dairy cows may reduce climate impact of manure in pasture soils during a laboratory incubation

Maine organic dairy producers’ receptiveness to seaweed supplementation and effect of Chondrus crispus on enteric methane emissions in lactating cows

Short‐term responses of soil carbon, nitrogen, and microbial biomass to cover crop mixtures and monocultures

Feeding incremental amounts of ground flaxseed: effects on diversity and relative abundance of ruminal microbiota and enteric methane emissions in lactating dairy cows

A. F. Brito Information

University

University of New Hampshire

Position

Associate Professor of Dairy Cattle Nutrition and Management

Citations(all)

2865

Citations(since 2020)

1568

Cited By

1804

hIndex(all)

27

hIndex(since 2020)

23

i10Index(all)

59

i10Index(since 2020)

42

Email

University Profile Page

University of New Hampshire

A. F. Brito Skills & Research Interests

dairy nutrition

ruminant nutrition

enteric methane

Top articles of A. F. Brito

Feeding alfalfa-grass or red clover–grass mixture baleage: Effect on milk yield and composition, ruminal fermentation and microbiota taxa relative abundance, and nutrient …

Authors

MJ Lange,LHP Silva,MA Zambom,KJ Soder,AF Brito

Journal

Journal of Dairy Science

Published Date

2024/4/1

Our goal was to investigate the effect of diets containing baleages harvested from alfalfa-grass or red clover–grass mixture on production performance, ruminal fermentation and microbiota taxa relative abundance, milk fatty acid profile, and nutrient utilization in dairy cows. Twenty Jersey cows (18 multiparous and 2 primiparous) averaging (mean ± SD) 148 ± 45.2 days in milk and 483 ± 65.4 kg of body weight in the beginning of the study were used in a randomized complete block design with repeated measures over time. The experiment lasted 9 wk, with a 2 wk covariate period followed by 7 wk of data and sample collection (wk 4 and 7 used in the statistical analyses). Cows were fed diets containing (dry matter basis) 35% of a concentrate mash and the following forage sources: (1) 65% second- and third-cut (32.5% each) alfalfa-grass mixture baleages (ALF) or (2) 65% second- and third-cut (32.5% each) red …

Assessment of blood sampling time points to determine the relative bioavailability of ruminally protected methionine supplements using the plasma free amino acid dose-response …

Authors

Nancy L Whitehouse,Devan L Chirgwin,Charles G Schwab,Daniel Luchini,Nelson Lobos,André F Brito

Journal

JDS Communications

Published Date

2024/3/29

The calculation of the relative bioavailability (RBV) of rumen-protected AA supplements using the plasma free AA dose-response technique currently relies on blood samples obtained 2, 4, 6, and 8 h after the 0500 h feeding during the last 3 d of each period in Latin square experiments with cows fed every 8 h (0500, 1300, and 2100 h). The objective of this study was to determine if this current blood sampling protocol captures the changes that may occur in plasma Met concentrations within a 24-h day to adequately determine the RBV of Met from Smartamine M (SM). Five multiparous lactating Holstein cows were used in a 5 × 5 Latin square design with 7-d periods. Treatments were: 1) control (abomasal infusion of tap water), 2) 12 g/d of abomasally infused Met, 3) 24 g/d of abomasally infused Met, 4) 15 g/d of fed Met from SM, and 5) 30 g/d of fed Met from SM. Blood samples were collected via jugular catheters …

Assessing forage research and education needs of organic dairy farms in the United States

Authors

Eric Hatungimana,Heather M Darby,Kathy J Soder,Sara E Ziegler,Andre F Brito,Lisa Kissing Kucek,Heathcliffe Riday,E Charles Brummer

Journal

Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems

Published Date

2024/1

The viability of organic dairy operations in the United States (US) relies on forage production. The objectives of this study were to (1) assess producer and farm information regarding current forage production practices and producer knowledge gaps and (2) identify forage research and educational needs of organic dairy producers across the US. A survey was distributed to 643 organic dairy producers across the US, with 165 respondents (26% response rate). A focus group consisting of extension professionals, university researchers and staff, consultants, dairy industry representatives and organic dairy producers was also consulted for forage research needs. Results showed that approximately half (51%) of surveyed producers were somewhat satisfied with their forage production systems and sometimes experienced negative weather-related impacts on forage yield and quality. A majority (64%) of producers felt …

Water Stress Influences Phytoestrogen Levels in Red Clover (Trifolium pratense) but Not Kura Clover (T. ambiguum)

Authors

Palash Mandal,David A Mortensen,André F Brito,Anna K Wallingford,Marta RM Lima,Nicholas D Warren,Richard G Smith

Journal

Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry

Published Date

2024/4/29

Some forage legumes synthesize phytoestrogens. We conducted a glasshouse study to investigate how water stress (drought and waterlogging) influences phytoestrogen accumulation in red clover and kura clover. Compared to the red clover control, the 20 day drought resulted in an over 100% increase in the phytoestrogens formononetin and biochanin A, which together accounted for 91–96% of the total phytoestrogens measured. Waterlogging resulted in elevated concentrations of daidzein, genistein, and prunetin but not formononetin or biochanin A. Concentrations of phytoestrogens in kura clover were low or undetectable, regardless of water stress treatment. Leaf water potential was the most explanatory single-predictor of the variation in concentrations of formononetin, biochanin A, and total phytoestrogens in red clover. These results suggest that drought-stressed red clover may have higher potential to …

Seaweed supplementation to organic dairy cows may reduce climate impact of manure in pasture soils during a laboratory incubation

Authors

Kyle A Arndt,Diana C Reyes,Charlotte TC Quigley,Andre F Brito,Nichole N Price,Alexandra R Contosta

Journal

Journal of Sustainable Agriculture and Environment

Published Date

2023/12

Introduction Enteric methane (CH4) emissions are one of the largest components of the anthropogenic CH4 budget, and with accelerating climatic changes, there are calls to reduce anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. Certain seaweeds fed as supplements can reduce enteric CH4 emissions from ruminant animals by as much as 80%; however, these studies have yet to analyze downstream impacts that may arise from the deposit of affected manures on pastures or agricultural fields. Materials and Methods Here we conducted a 28‐day soil and manure incubation utilizing manures collected from dairy cows in a seaweed feeding trial to analyze the impacts of manure on greenhouse gas fluxes and nutrient cycling. Cows were fed different diets with a control group (no seaweed supplementation), and a 3% and 6% by dry‐weight seaweed (Chondrus crispus) supplementation. Three soil moisture treatments …

Maine organic dairy producers’ receptiveness to seaweed supplementation and effect of Chondrus crispus on enteric methane emissions in lactating cows

Authors

Diana C Reyes,Jennifer Meredith,Leah Puro,Katherine Berry,Richard Kersbergen,Kathy J Soder,Charlotte Quigley,Michael Donihue,Dorn Cox,Nichole N Price,Andre F Brito

Journal

Frontiers in Veterinary Science

Published Date

2023

MethodsA survey was developed to identify barriers and drivers towards the adoption of CH 4-reducing algal-based feeds. Concurrently, a randomized complete block design study was conducted to investigate the effect of C. crispus on enteric CH 4 emissions and milk production in a typical Maine organic dairy farm. Twenty-two organically certified Holstein and Jersey cows averaging 29±6.8 kg of milk/d and 150±69 days in milk, were blocked and randomly assigned to a control diet without C. crispus (0CC), or with 6%[dry matter (DM) basis] C. crispus (6CC). Samples were collected on the last week of the 2-wk covariate period, and wk 3, 5, 8, and 10 after initiation of treatments for a total of 12 weeks. Gaseous emissions were measured using a GreenFeed unit. Data were analyzed using the MIXED procedure of SAS with repeated measures over time.ResultsAll survey respondents (n= 35; 54% response rate …

Short‐term responses of soil carbon, nitrogen, and microbial biomass to cover crop mixtures and monocultures

Authors

Igor Alexandre de Souza,Amanda B Daly,Jörg Schnecker,Nicholas D Warren,Adalfredo Rocha Lobo Jr,Richard G Smith,Andre Fonseca Brito,A Stuart Grandy

Journal

Agrosystems, Geosciences & Environment

Published Date

2023/9

Increasingly, cover crops are being adopted for the purpose of improving soil health, yet the timescale and magnitude by which living annual cover crops might modify soil chemical and biological aspects of soil health is not well understood. At the same time, there is growing interest among farmers in cover crop mixtures due to perceptions that species‐rich cover crop communities will enhance soil health relative to monocultures. In a field experiment in southeast New Hampshire, we investigated how groups of cover crops grown as monocultures and mixtures for specific seasonal niches (winter/spring, summer, and fall) influenced levels of soil nitrogen (N) and carbon (C), microbial biomass carbon (MBC), and nitrogen (MBN). Soils were sampled at cover crop maturity (winter/spring group), and at seeding, mid‐season, and maturity (summer and fall groups). In the winter/spring group, average total soil N ranged …

Feeding incremental amounts of ground flaxseed: effects on diversity and relative abundance of ruminal microbiota and enteric methane emissions in lactating dairy cows

Authors

Kleves V Almeida,Tales L Resende,Luiz Henrique P Silva,Christopher D Dorich,Andre BD Pereira,Kathy J Soder,Andre F Brito

Journal

Translational Animal Science

Published Date

2023/1/1

We evaluated the effects of incremental amounts of ground flaxseed (GFX) on diversity and relative abundance of ruminal microbiota taxa, enteric methane (CH4) emissions, and urinary excretion of purine derivatives (PD) in lactating dairy cows in a replicated 4 × 4 Latin square design. Twenty mid-lactation Jersey cows were used in the study. Of these 20 cows, 12 were used for ruminal sampling, 16 for enteric CH4 measurements, and all for spot urine collection. Each period lasted 21 d with 14 d for diet adaptation and 7 d for data and sample collection. Diets were formulated by replacing corn meal and soybean meal with 0%, 5%, 10%, and 15% of GFX in the diet’s dry matter. Ruminal fluid samples obtained via stomach tubing were used for DNA extraction. Enteric CH4 production was measured using the sulfur hexafluoride tracer technique. Diets had no effect on ruminal microbiota diversity. Similarly, the …

Replacing ground corn with soyhulls plus palmitic acid in low metabolizable protein diets with or without rumen-protected amino acids: Effects on production and nutrient …

Authors

Y Zang,LHP Silva,YC Geng,MJ Lange,MA Zambom,AF Brito

Journal

Journal of Dairy Science

Published Date

2023/6/1

We previously observed that diets with reduced starch concentration decreased yields of milk and milk protein in dairy cows fed low metabolizable protein diets. Supplementation of reduced-starch diets with a lipid source may attenuate or eliminate production losses. Our objective was to investigate the effects of partially replacing ground corn with soyhulls plus a palmitic acid-enriched supplement on dry matter (DM) intake, milk yield and composition, plasma AA concentration, and N and energy utilization in cows fed low metabolizable protein diets (mean = −68 g/d balance) with or without rumen-protected Met, Lys, and His (RP-MLH). Sixteen multiparous Holstein cows averaging (mean ± standard deviation) 112 ± 28 d in milk, 724 ± 44 kg of body weight, and 46 ± 5 kg/d of milk in the beginning of the study were used in a replicated 4 × 4 Latin square design with a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments. Each …

Evaluating taste preference of different sources of Ascophyllum nodosum meal in dairy heifers

Authors

KV Almeida,E Jordan,PS Erickson,AF Brito

Journal

JDS Communications

Published Date

2023/12/9

We evaluated the supplementation of different sources of the brown seaweed Ascophyllum nodosum (ASCO) meal on taste preference in dairy heifers using a sequential elimination experiment. Six organic certified Jersey heifers averaging (mean ± SD) 16 ± 1.15 weeks of age and 92 ± 9.88 kg of body weight at the beginning of the study were used. Treatments consisted of a ground corn-based concentrate mash without seaweed supplementation (control), or this same concentrate mash supplemented with 57 g/d of ASCO meal obtained from Acadian Seaplants (Acadian Kelp), North American Kelp (SeaLife Kelp), or Thorvin Inc. (Thorvin for Animals). The experiment was conducted with 1 heifer enrolled at a time for 11 d each (n = 66 d total) with the feeding regimens distributed as follows: d 0–2 (adaptation phase), d 3–6 (feeding segment 1), d 7–9 (feeding segment 2), and d 10–11 (feeding segment 3). During the …

Enteric methane emissions in grazing dairy systems

Authors

Kathy J Soder,Andre F Brito

Published Date

2023/5/11

Approximately 80% of agricultural CH4 comes from livestock systems, with 90% of that derived from enteric CH4 production by ruminants. Grazing systems are used worldwide to feed dairy cattle. Although quantifying enteric CH4 emissions in grazing systems has unique challenges, emerging technologies have made gaseous data collection more feasible and less laborious. Nevertheless, robust data sets on enteric CH4 emissions under various grazing conditions, as well as effective and economic strategies to mitigate CH4 emissions in grazing dairy cows, are still in high demand because data collection, feeding management, and milk market regulations (e.g., organic certification, grassfed) impose more challenges to grazing than confinement dairy systems. This review will cover management strategies to mitigate enteric CH4 emissions and applicability to pastoral dairy systems. The effects of enteric CH4 in the …

Effect of low-glucosinolate crambe meal in diet on lactational performance, efficiency of nutrient utilization, and hepatic function of crossbred Holstein× Zebu and Jersey cows

Authors

Daiane Caroline de Moura,Flavio Junior Gonçalves Vieira,Robson Moreira Miranda,Poliana Oliveira Cordeiro,Luana Molossi,Danielly da Silva Souza,Viviane Helena Zampieri,Suziane Rodrigues Soares,Fernanda Norberto Viana,André Fonseca de Brito,André Soares de Oliveira

Journal

Tropical Animal Health and Production

Published Date

2023/12

Crambe meal (CM) is a potential dietary protein source for ruminant, but its effects in diets for lactating dairy cows remains unknown. We evaluated the effects of inclusion of the low-glucosinolates (GIs) CM (450 mg GIs/kg DM) in partial total mixed ration (pTMR) on performance, efficiency of nutrient utilization, and hepatic function of crossbred Holstein × Zebu and Jersey cows. Eight crossbred Holstein × Zebu cows and four Jersey cows were blocked by breed and days in milk, and randomly assigned in a replicated 4 × 4 Latin square design, and distributed in one of four isonitrogenous TMRs (130 g CP/kg DM): 0, 45, 90, and 135 g CM/kg DM pTMR. Crambe meal was included in pTMR replacing soybean meal (SBM) and ground corn grain (GCG). The pTMRs were offered ad libitum between 7:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Cows were kept on pasture of Panicum maximum cv. Mombaça (90.4 g CP/kg DM) between 6:00 p.m …

Effect of incremental amounts of Asparagopsis taxiformis on ruminal fermentation and methane production in continuous culture with orchardgrass herbage

Authors

Danielle M Andreen,Eric D Billman,Andre F Brito,Kathy J Soder

Journal

Animal Feed Science and Technology

Published Date

2023/5/1

Enteric methane (CH4) emissions from ruminants are a significant contributor to total greenhouse gas emissions from the livestock sector. Previous research has demonstrated that the red seaweed Asparagopsis taxiformis strongly inhibits ruminal methanogenesis, but its effects on CH4 production, nutrient digestibility, and ruminal fermentation when added to a cool-season herbage diet have not been assessed. A 4-unit, single-flow continuous culture fermentor system fed orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.) herbage was used to assess the effects of incremental addition of dietary A. taxiformis (0, 5, 10, or 15 g/kg DM) on nutrient digestibility, volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentration, pH, CH4 production, and N metabolism. Treatments were randomly assigned to fermentors in a randomized block design with 7 d of treatment adaptation and 3 d of sample collection. Fermentors were fed a total of 76 g of DM per day, split …

Identifying optimal early‐season harvest timing in annual fall forages

Authors

Eric D Billman,Igor Alexandre de Souza,Richard G Smith,Kathy J Soder,Nicholas D Warren,André F Brito

Journal

Crop, Forage & Turfgrass Management

Published Date

2022

Fall forage production in the northeastern United States is complicated by early onset of cool temperatures, limiting forage availability in cool‐season perennials. Annual forages planted in late summer as cover crops or supplemental forage crops may fill this niche; however, data on their nutritive value over the short fall harvest window is lacking. This study compared six annual forage crops for their forage mass and nutritive value and identified optimal harvest times based on changes between forage mass and digestibility. Monocultures of canola (Brassica napus L.), forage radish (Raphanus sativus L.), oat (Avena sativa L.), spring triticale (×Triticosecale Wittm. ex A. Camus [Secale × Triticum]), spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), sunn hemp (Crotolaria juncea L.), and a mixture of all six species were sown in August of 2015 and 2016 then harvested at three time points (6, 8, and 10 weeks after planting [WAP]) over …

191 Evaluation of Diverse Cool-Season Grass Mixtures with red Clover on Ruminal Fermentation in Continuous Culture

Authors

Miriam A Snider,Bharath K Mulakala,Ashley W Driemel,Sara E Ziegler,Heather M Darby,Kathy J Soder,Andre F Brito,Sabrina L Greenwood

Journal

Journal of Animal Science

Published Date

2022/10/1

Dual-flow continuous culture fermenters were used to evaluate the impacts of forage mixtures on ruminal fermentation. Diets (DM basis) contained 40% red clover combined with 1) 60% orchardgrass (OG); 2) 30% orchardgrass + 30% meadow fescue (MF); 3) 20% orchardgrass + 20% meadow fescue + 20% Kentucky bluegrass (KYBG); or 4) 15% orchardgrass + 15% meadow fescue + 15% Kentucky bluegrass + 15% perennial ryegrass (PRG). Treatments were randomly assigned to fermenters in a 4 x 4 Latin square design. Each 10-d period included a 7-d adaptation and 3-d sampling period. Diets (110 g DM/d) were added across 4 feedings/d (33% each, 0700 h and 1600 h; 17% each, 0820h and 1720 h). Fermenter pH was recorded continuously for 10-d. Methane was measured on d 7-10 at 0630 and 1530 h. Effluent samples were collected on d 8-10. Results were analyzed using PROC GLIMMIX of SAS …

Evaluating warm‐season annual forages to fill summer forage gaps in short‐season climates

Authors

Eric D Billman,Igor A de Souza,Richard G Smith,Kathy J Soder,Nicholas Warren,André F Brito

Journal

Crop, Forage & Turfgrass Management

Published Date

2022

Annual warm‐season forages have been used to fill productivity and nutritional gaps during summer months throughout the southeastern United States. However, their performance and nutritive value in cooler, short‐season temperate climates above 40 °N has been less well studied. This study evaluated the forage mass and nutritive value of four warm‐season annual forages {brown midrib [BMR] sudangrass [Sorghum bicolor ssp. Drummondii (L.) Moench], buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench), Japanese millet [Echniochloa esculenta (A. Braun) H. Scholz], and teff [Eragrostis tef (Zuccagni) Trotter]} compared with a cool‐season small grain forage, oat (Avena sativa L.), and a cool‐season annual forage legume, chickling vetch (Lathyrus sativus L.). Monocultures of the six annual forage species, along with a mixture of all six species, were evaluated over 2 years in southeastern New Hampshire. Forage …

Effect of alfalfa-or red clover-grass mixtures on dietary energy utilization in lactating dairy cows

Authors

MJ Lange,LH Silva,KJ Soder,MA Zambon,A Brito

Journal

American Dairy Science Association Proceedings

Published Date

2022/7/15

Eighteen multiparous and 2 primiparous mid-lactation organic certified Jersey cows were blocked in pairs by DIM or parity and, within pair, assigned to treatments in a randomized complete block design to investigate the effects of legume-grass mixtures on dietary energy utilization. Forages were harvested as baleage, with diets fed as TMR. The botanical composition (DM basis) of second-cut alfalfa-grass (ALF-G) or red clover-grass (RC-G) swards averaged 65 vs. 80% legume, 17 vs. 15% grasses, and 18 vs. 5% weeds, and that of third-cut ALF-G or RC-G averaged 84 vs. 96.5% legume, 3 vs. 2.3% grasses, and 13 vs. 1.2% weeds, respectively. Diets contained (DM basis) 65% second-and third-cut ALF-G or RC-G (32.5% of each cut) and 35% concentrate. The study lasted 9 wk (2-wk covariate) with data and sample collection done at wk 4 and 7. Methane production was measured with a GreenFeed unit. Fecal grab and spot urinary samples were collected at 5 different time points over 3 d. Feeds and feces were analyzed for gross energy (GE) with a bomb calorimeter. Urinary energy, tissue energy, and heat production (HP) were estimated using published equations. Intake of GE, digestible energy (DE), metabolizable energy (ME), and NEL did not differ (P= 0.63) and averaged 93.2, 60.8, 53.5, and 45.7 Mcal/d, respectively. In contrast, fecal energy (35.5 vs. 29.4 Mcal/d) and milk energy (19.7 vs. 18.5 Mcal/d) decreased (P= 0.04) with feeding RC-G vs. ALF-G. Diet by week interactions were observed for urinary energy (P= 0.05) and methane energy (P= 0.03), and trends for HP (P= 0.10) and tissue energy (P= 0.06). Urinary energy, methane …

An overview of organic, grassfed dairy farm management and factors related to higher milk production

Authors

Miriam A Snider,Sara E Ziegler,Heather M Darby,Kathy J Soder,André F Brito,Brent Beidler,Sarah Flack,Sabrina L Greenwood,Meredith T Niles

Published Date

2022/12

Organic, grassfed (OGF) dairy, which requires higher pasture and forage dry matter intake compared with standard organic dairy practices, is unique both in its management needs and in production challenges. The OGF dairy sector is rapidly growing, with the expansion of this industry outpacing other dairy sectors. There is a lack of research outlining OGF dairy production practices, producer-identified research needs or social factors that affect OGF systems. The objectives of this study were to, with a group of OGF dairy producers, (1) assess information regarding current production practices and producer knowledge, and (2) identify agronomic and social factors that may influence milk production on OGF farms across the United States. A mail survey, focused on demographics, forage and animal management, knowledge, and satisfaction of their farm, was developed and distributed in 2019, with 167 responses (47 …

Supplementation of Ascophyllum nodosum meal and monensin: Effects on diversity and relative abundance of ruminal bacterial taxa and the metabolism of iodine and arsenic in …

Authors

LHP Silva,SF Reis,ATO Melo,BP Jackson,AF Brito

Journal

Journal of Dairy Science

Published Date

2022/5/1

Previous research has shown that the brown seaweed Ascophyllum nodosum (ASCO) has antimicrobial and antioxidant properties and also increases milk I concentration. We aimed to investigate the effects of supplementing ASCO meal or monensin (MON) on ruminal fermentation, diversity and relative abundance of ruminal bacterial taxa, metabolism of I and As, and blood concentrations of thyroid hormones, antioxidant enzymes, and cortisol in lactating dairy cows. Five multiparous ruminally cannulated Jersey cows averaging (mean ± standard deviation) 102 ± 15 d in milk and 450 ± 33 kg of body weight at the beginning of the study were used in a Latin square design with 28-d periods (21 d for diet adaptation and 7 d for data and sample collection). Cows were fed ad libitum a basal diet containing (dry matter basis) 65% forage as haylage and corn silage and 35% concentrate and were randomly assigned to 1 …

Feeding calcium-ammonium nitrate to lactating dairy goats: milk quality and ruminal fermentation responses

Authors

Kleves V Almeida,Geraldo T Santos,Jesus AC Osorio,Jean CS Lourenço,Monique Figueiredo,Thomer Durman,Francilaine E Marchi,Claudete R Alcalde,Ranulfo C Silva-Junior,Camila CBF Itavo,Rafael C Araujo,Andre F Brito

Journal

Animals

Published Date

2022/4/11

Simple Summary Calcium-ammonium nitrate (CAN) has been extensively used as a potential methane inhibitor for ruminants; however, there is still a need for studies focused on investigating its effects on the fatty acid profile and antioxidant capacity of milk, especially from dairy goats. Therefore, we evaluated the effects of CAN on nutrient digestibility, ruminal fermentation, and milk quality of lactating Saanen goats. Treatments consisted of a control diet (without CAN), 10 g of CAN per kg of dry matter, and 20 g of CAN per kg of dry matter. Supplemental CAN did not affect feed intake, digestibility of nutrients, and most ruminal fermentation parameters. Yields and composition of milk were not affected, and minor treatment effects were observed on the milk fatty acid profile. Milk antioxidant capacity was altered by increased conjugated dienes and reduced thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, along with greater concentrations of nitrate and nitrite residues in milk. Calcium-ammonium nitrate can be fed to lactating dairy goats up to 20 g per kg of dry matter without negative effects on nutrient digestibility and milk composition; however, it increased the concentration of conjugated dienes in milk, which may induce its faster lipid oxidation. Abstract We aimed to investigate the effects of calcium-ammonium nitrate (CAN) fed to lactating dairy goats on dry matter (DM) intake, digestibility of nutrients, milk properties (composition, antioxidant capacity, fatty acid profile, and nitrate residues), and ruminal fermentation parameters. Twelve lactating Saanen goats averaging 98.5 ± 13.1 days in milk, 53.5 ± 3.3 kg of body weight, and 2 …

See List of Professors in A. F. Brito University(University of New Hampshire)

A. F. Brito FAQs

What is A. F. Brito's h-index at University of New Hampshire?

The h-index of A. F. Brito has been 23 since 2020 and 27 in total.

What are A. F. Brito's top articles?

The articles with the titles of

Feeding alfalfa-grass or red clover–grass mixture baleage: Effect on milk yield and composition, ruminal fermentation and microbiota taxa relative abundance, and nutrient …

Assessment of blood sampling time points to determine the relative bioavailability of ruminally protected methionine supplements using the plasma free amino acid dose-response …

Assessing forage research and education needs of organic dairy farms in the United States

Water Stress Influences Phytoestrogen Levels in Red Clover (Trifolium pratense) but Not Kura Clover (T. ambiguum)

Seaweed supplementation to organic dairy cows may reduce climate impact of manure in pasture soils during a laboratory incubation

Maine organic dairy producers’ receptiveness to seaweed supplementation and effect of Chondrus crispus on enteric methane emissions in lactating cows

Short‐term responses of soil carbon, nitrogen, and microbial biomass to cover crop mixtures and monocultures

Feeding incremental amounts of ground flaxseed: effects on diversity and relative abundance of ruminal microbiota and enteric methane emissions in lactating dairy cows

...

are the top articles of A. F. Brito at University of New Hampshire.

What are A. F. Brito's research interests?

The research interests of A. F. Brito are: dairy nutrition, ruminant nutrition, enteric methane

What is A. F. Brito's total number of citations?

A. F. Brito has 2,865 citations in total.

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