A. Dirk Moses

A. Dirk Moses

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

H-index: 36

North America-United States

About A. Dirk Moses

A. Dirk Moses, With an exceptional h-index of 36 and a recent h-index of 26 (since 2020), a distinguished researcher at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, specializes in the field of International Relations.

His recent articles reflect a diverse array of research interests and contributions to the field:

The Russian Invasion of Ukraine: Victims, Perpetrators, Justice, and the Question of Genocide

Security, genocide, and the holocaust: a forum

2 Genocide as a Category Mistake: Permanent Security and Mass Violence Against Civilians" Genocide" is a category mistake in the legal regime ostensibly protecting civil

The German Campaign against Cultural Freedom: Documenta 15 in Context

Introduction: The Russian Invasion of Ukraine

The International Administration of Territory as an Interim Peace

Patriotic history and the (re) nationalization of memory

Podcasts History of Ideas section, Review of Democracy

A. Dirk Moses Information

University

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Position

___

Citations(all)

6087

Citations(since 2020)

2482

Cited By

3676

hIndex(all)

36

hIndex(since 2020)

26

i10Index(all)

70

i10Index(since 2020)

47

Email

University Profile Page

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

A. Dirk Moses Skills & Research Interests

International Relations

Top articles of A. Dirk Moses

The Russian Invasion of Ukraine: Victims, Perpetrators, Justice, and the Question of Genocide

Authors

Diana Dumitru,A Dirk Moses

Published Date

2024/7/12

This book examines crucial facets of the Russian invasion: among them, the Russian sexual violence against occupied Ukrainians, their “collaboration” and “filtration,” legal prosecutions especially relating to kidnapped Ukrainian children, the portrayal of events in Bucha on Russian social media, and the lessons learned from the Ukrainian refugee crisis in Poland during the initial weeks of the war, as well the potential pursuit of justice at the International Court of Justice, and the genocide claim more generally. This anthology will serve as a valuable resource for scholars, policymakers, and the broader community involved in the study of genocide and conflict. It endeavours to offer not only insights into the immediate circumstances of the invasion but also a framework for broader discussions and a foundation for informed dialogues on the multifaceted dimensions of this geopolitical upheaval. The chapters in this book were originally published as a special issue of Journal of Genocide Research.

Security, genocide, and the holocaust: a forum

Authors

Jan Burzlaff,John K Roth,Annette Weinke,Itamar Mann,A Dirk Moses

Journal

Holocaust Studies

Published Date

2023/7/3

Dirk Moses's 2021 The Problems of Genocide has generated some debates — but it should also be an essential reference for Holocaust scholars. Moving beyond polemics and the black-and-white debates about the Holocaust's uniqueness, this forum invites a critical assessment of the book from three disciplines – international law, philosophy, and history. The forum seeks to begin erasing disciplinary boundaries within Holocaust studies. Not only in this sense is Moses’s book precious for its analytical thrusts – such as permanent security and mass violence's paranoid worlds – and its far-reaching consequences for the study of mass violence.

2 Genocide as a Category Mistake: Permanent Security and Mass Violence Against Civilians" Genocide" is a category mistake in the legal regime ostensibly protecting civil

Authors

A Dirk Moses

Journal

Genocidal Violence: Concepts, Forms, Impact

Published Date

2023/11/6

16 A. Dirk Moses guilty or at least expendable.* In that case, the de facto, if not de jure, hierarchy of international makes little sense. Commentators nonetheless typically insist that such civilian destruction cannot be equated with genocide. Military violence is limited to defeating enemies, they say, even if killing some civilians in the process is inevitable according to the" doctrine of double effect," which permits the killing of innocents as a side effect of a moral end, like self-defense. 5 Genocide, by contrast, aims to destroy “enemy" peoples and can never be a moral end. However, this can be a distinction without difference if one does not privilege the intention of states. According to military logic, the killing of enemy civilians continues until victory is achieved, even if it amounts to" genocidal” proportions. What does it matter to civilians in the moment if they are killed with genocidal or military intent? And what if the fantastical geopolitical imperatives of states, especially of great powers, entail outward expansion to make them feel safe, leading to “special military operations” or “infinite,"" forever,"" endless," and" permanent" wars? Such wars are enabled by the use of drones, missiles, and artillery, which shifts risk from armed personnel to enemy non-combatants, resulting in" repeated small massacres' of civilians.” 7 In these circumstances, the continuous killing of civilians becomes the norm rather than confined to occasional wars: they are casualties of “mowing the grass,” as Israeli security analysts call the “long-term strategy of attrition designed primarily to debilitate the enemy capabilities" in their" protracted intractable conflict" with Hamas. Civilian …

The German Campaign against Cultural Freedom: Documenta 15 in Context

Authors

A Dirk Moses

Journal

Grey Room

Published Date

2023/7/1

The controversy about Documenta 15 consumed the German public sphere throughout 2022 and continued into 2023. Hardly a day passed without a salacious newspaper article, television report, or social media storm about the art exhibition. Beginning six months before Documenta opened in June 2022, the fevered coverage proclaimed the discovery of the German media’s favorite topic: an antisemitism scandal. Although Documenta 15 was not shut down, as critics had demanded, to a great extent the campaign against it succeeded in crystallizing new tropes in German public discourse:“postcolonial antisemitism” and “antisemitism of all types,” meaning “Israel-related antisemitism” and “hatred of Israel.” The mention of “hatred” was designed to link antisemitism (hatred of Jews) to anti-Zionism (alleged hatred of the State of Israel). 1 The purpose of this semantic stretching is twofold. The first is to insinuate that …

Introduction: The Russian Invasion of Ukraine

Authors

Diana Dumitru,A Dirk Moses

Published Date

2023/10/2

Since Russia’s invasion of Ukraine in February 2022, the reverberations of this conflict have consumed ordinary individuals, scholars, and practitioners with unyielding intensity. In view of conflict’s magnitude and accompanying accusations of genocide on both sides, the editors of the Journal of Genocide Research decided to address its various dimensions in a dedicated special issue of the journal. There are inherent challenges in researching an ongoing conflict, like access to reliable data and quality information. Nevertheless, we embarked on a scholarly endeavour to explore various dimensions arising from the Russian invasion. Needless to say, we sought out Ukrainian and other Eastern European scholars. The essays contained here appeared on the journal’s webpage between May 2022 and December 2023, and are now gathered together as numbers 3 and 4 of volume 25.This special issue meticulously …

The International Administration of Territory as an Interim Peace

Authors

A Dirk Moses,Jessie Barton Hronešová

Journal

Journal of Genocide Research

Published Date

2023/10/2

The Russian invasion of Ukraine has reached a new, critical stage, with a confluence of developments that could lead to a number of possible scenarios discussed in the press and by think tanks. 1 Currently, Russia has pummelled Ukraine–especially its electricity and water infrastructure–with missiles and Iranian drones, even destroying the Kakhovka dam of the Dnipro River, with catastrophic environmental and other consequences. At the time of writing (November 2023), the much-awaited Ukrainian counter-offensive has been underway for months, but making only slow progress against well-dug-in Russian defences. Ukraine’s war aims remain unchanged, understandably reflecting international law: the recovery of its occupied and annexed territories. Naturally, these include not only those invaded since 24 February 2022, but also Donbas in the eastern part of the country (the proclaimed Donetsk People’s …

Patriotic history and the (re) nationalization of memory

Authors

Kornelia Kończal,A Dirk Moses

Published Date

2023/6/27

This book charts and traces state-mandated or state-encouraged “patriotic” histories that have recently emerged in many places around the globe. Such “patriotic” histories can revolve around both affirmative interpretations of the past and celebration of national achievements. They can also entail explicitly denialist stances against acknowledging responsibility for past atrocities, even to the extent of celebrating perpetrators. Whereas in some cases “patriotic” history takes the shape of a coherent doctrine, in others they remain limited to loosely connected narratives. By combining nationalist and narcissist narratives, and by disregarding or distorting historical evidence,“patriotic” history promotes mythified, monumental, and moralistic interpretations of the past that posit partisan and authoritarian essentialisms and exceptionalisms. Whereas the global debates in interdisciplinary memory studies revolve around concepts like cosmopolitan, global, multidirectional, relational, transcultural, and transnational memory, to mention but a few, the actual socio-political uses of history remain strikingly nation-centred and one-dimensional. This volume collects fifteen caste studies of such “nationalizations of history” ranging from China to the Baltic states. They highlight three features of this phenomenon: the ruthlessness of methods applied by many state authorities to impose certain interpretations of the past, the increasing discrepancy between professional and political approaches to collective memory, and the new “post-truth” context. This book will be of interest to students and researchers of international politics, the radical right and global history. It was …

Podcasts History of Ideas section, Review of Democracy

Authors

Ferenc Laczo

Published Date

2023

As co-head of the section History of Ideas at the Review of Democracy (https://revdem. ceu. edu/), I have released podcasts with dozens of authors in 2023. Several of these conversations have been released alongside their edited transcripts.

Replacing ‘Genocide’with ‘Permanent Security’via Genealogy

Authors

A Dirk Moses

Journal

Global Intellectual History

Published Date

2023/9/1

Ferenc Laczó writes that The Problems of Genocide is several monographs in one. He is right. That is one reason it took so long to write, and that it’s too long. I am thus especially grateful to the commentators for investing their precious time in reading the book, and for penning their texts; and of course to Rosario López for organising the forum, and to Global Intellectual History for hosting it. The reason that The Problems of Genocide is several books in one is that it is not a conventional history of a concept. Ferenc Laczó is right once again, observing that the book is operating in several registers–political and historical–and utilising several methods. Among them is not only Cambridge School-inspired intellectual history, as he writes, but also a critically inflected genealogy of a ‘keyword’(Raymond Williams). I am interested less in the origins of genocide than in the production of its ‘truth,’its apparent naturalness, and …

The Diplomacy of Genocide

Authors

A Dirk Moses

Journal

The Oxford Handbook of History and International Relations

Published Date

2023/8/16

THIS chapter delineates a particular domain of international relations: the'diplomacy of genocide. This domain comprises the intranational and international interactions between state and nonstate actors about genocide, in particular how to categorize and memorialize mass violence, and how to assess the merits of intervention to prevent or stop it. Before the concept of genocide was invented in 1944, such questions pertained to atrocities, ranging in type from the Belgian King Leopold II's labour exploitation of Africans in the Congo to the massacre and deportation of Armenians by Ottoman authorities during the First World War. The scale of human destruction in the Second World War revealed the limitations of the diplomacy of atrocity and led to the United Nations Convention on the Punishment and Prevention of Genocide (UNGC) in 1948. But, despite the lofty rhetoric accompanying the convention and Universal Declaration on Human Rights that many heralded as manifesting the progressive potential of modernity after its darkest moment, civilians were not comprehensively protected from mass violence. For the United Nations (UN) Charter (1945), the UNGC, and the subsequent evolution of Holocaust memory built two paradoxical features into the new diplomacy of genocide: 1) the expansion of humanitarian sensitivity in the stigmatization of genocide was accompanied by a contraction of the humanitarian imagination due to the immense symbolic aura of its archetype, the Holocaust, which set an impossibly high analogical bar; and 2) the stimulation of intervention constituencies invoking the Holocaust analogy, and eventually the …

CHAPTER 30 THE TRUMP PRESIDENCY, THE QUESTION OF PALESTINE, AND BIDEN’S BUSINESS AS USUAL

Authors

A Dirk Moses,Victor Kattan

Published Date

2023/12/31

People, the Trump administration’s 181-page policy document on the subject, informally called “The Deal of the Century.” 1 To resolve the conflict, it identified and proposed to solve two problems: the conflict between Israelis and Palestinians and that between Israel and the Muslim world. The latter solution manifested itself in the so-called Abraham Accords: bilateral economic, cultural, and trade agreements establishing diplomatic relations between Israel and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), Bahrain, and Morocco, which were signed in 2020. 2 As Charles S. Maier aptly puts it in chapter 42, the agreement represents “a latter-day Holy Alliance sanctimoniously named for the spiritual ancestor of the three monotheistic faiths.” The “Deal of the Century” offered what it called a “realistic two-state solution,” meaning that Palestinian self-government was limited by “Israeli security responsibility and Israeli control of the …

Self-Determination, and the Rise of Global Human Rights. Cambridge: Cambridge

Authors

A Dirk Moses,Marco Duranti,Roland Burke

Published Date

2022

Politics edited by A. Dirk Moses, Marco Duranti and Roland Burke, the contributors address various strands of the history of human rights, especially the concept's significance in the rise and fall of empire and its deployment in the rhetoric of decolonization. The volume's editors place its objectives at the juncture of the competing ideas of human rights at the international and national levels. They observe, for example, that while the global human rights discourse proclaimed individual rights beyond the state, older iterations of the rights language, as exemplified by the French Revolution, bestowed or promised only human rights that derived from national citizenship (1-31). Contributors to the first part of the volume used several access points to investigate the similarities and differences-in rhetorical messaging as well as praxis-between liberal human rights rooted in national citizenship and the more nuanced version of …

Use, War, and Commercial Society. Changing Paradigms of Human Relations with Animals in the Early Modern Law of Nature and of Nations 1–35

Authors

South Pacific,Michael Rothberg,A Dirk Moses,Marco Duranti,Roland Burke

Journal

Journal of the history of International Law

Published Date

2022

Contents Page 1 © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2022 | doi:10.1163/15718050-02404008 Journal of the history of International Law 24 (2022) 601–604 brill.com/jhil Contents volume 24, no. 1 Articles Use, War, and Commercial Society. Changing Paradigms of Human Relations with Animals in the Early Modern Law of Nature and of Nations 1–35 Annabel Brett The Legal Status of Historic Bays in the Light of the Works of the League of Nations Committee of Experts for the Progressive Codification of International Law 36–61 Tomasz Kamiński Legal Models and Methods of Western Colonisation of the South Pacific 62–101 Sarah Heathcote The United States and Human Rights Marginalization at the International Court of Justice, 1945–1950 102–134 Olivier Barsalou Book Reviews Michael Rothberg, The Implicated Subject: Beyond Victims and Perpetrators [2019] 135–141 Deborah Whitehall A. Dirk Moses, Marco …

Patriotic histories in global perspective

Authors

Kornelia Kończal,A Dirk Moses

Published Date

2022/4/3

The spectre of “patriotism” continues to haunt countries around the world. In 2015, Patriot Park was opened in Kubinka, one hour’s drive from Moscow. Combining the Main Cathedral of the Russian Armed Forces with entertainment centres and an exhibition venue hosting the world’s biggest collection of armed vehicles, Patriot Park is supposed to strengthen Russia’s “system of military-patriotic work with young people.” 1 In 2016, the Chinese Ministry of Education called for “patriotic education” to be included in Chinese school curricula and university teaching. Chinese children and students should learn to “always follow the party” and “constantly enhance their sense of belonging to the Chinese nation.” 2 In 2020, Donald Trump established the “1776 Commission” to support “patriotic education” and defend American history against liberal and leftist revisionism. 3 Further examples of a “patriotic” turn in memory …

Top-Down and Local Violence in the Late Ottoman Empire: The Role of Security Concerns and a Century of “Accumulated Experience”

Authors

Taner Akçam

Journal

Journal of Genocide Research

Published Date

2022/10/13

During the extermination process of the Armenians of the Ottoman Empire in the World War I, there were two related, but dynamically different forms of violence at work. The first of these can be termed “top-down” violence, in the form of government policies put into practice by the ruling Union and Progress Party through the decisions of its Central Committee. The other form, “bottom-up” violence, was perpetrated by local forces who took advantage of the possibilities and opportunities created by wartime conditions and central government decisions. The target of both types was the population of Ottoman Christians, and the Armenians, first and foremost. The origins of the “top-down” violence are to be found in the century of “accumulated experience” of the Ottoman regime in dealing with various Christian populations within its European territories and their demands for greater economic, social, and political rights, as …

Parliamentary Condemnations of Mass Atrocities and the Obligation to Prevent Genocide and Crimes against Humanity

Authors

Larissa van den Herik,Rafael Braga da Silva

Journal

Wash. U. Global Stud. L. Rev.

Published Date

2022

Domestic parliaments can play a critical role in shaping domestic responses to international incidents. Recently, the world has witnessed an increased resort to legal terms such as genocide and crimes against humanity being used to describe mass atrocities outside courtrooms. Parliaments have relied on such language when issuing declarations and condemnations about past and ongoing mass atrocities. However, the focus on qualification has often overshadowed the equally, or perhaps even more, important discussion on follow-up measures or actions. This article provides an overview of parliamentary declarations, analysing their temporal aspect and content. Such typology provides the article with a springboard to assess the potential legal value of such parliamentary declarations in international law. This article makes the claim that parliamentary declarations can play a role within the realm of the obligation …

Genocide: Key Themes

Authors

Donald Bloxham,A Dirk Moses

Published Date

2022/3/24

The growth of scholarship on the pressing problem of genocide shows no sign of abating. This volume takes stock of Genocide Studies in all its multi-disciplinary diversity by adopting a thematic rather than case-study approach. Each chapter is by an expert in the field and comprises an up-to-date survey of emerging and established areas of enquiry while highlighting problems and making suggestions about avenues for future research. Each essay also has a select bibliography to facilitate further reading. Key themes include imperial violence and military contexts for genocide, predicting, preventing, and prosecuting genocide, gender, ideology, the state, memory, transitional justice, and ecocide. The volume also scrutinises the concept of genocide-its elasticity, limits, and problems. It does not provide a definition of genocide but rather encourages the reader to think critically about genocide as a conceptual and legal category concerned with identity-based violence against civilians.

Partisan history and the East European region of memory

Authors

A Dirk Moses

Published Date

2022/8/18

The author engages with the politically loaded turbulent processes of national memory building in the decolonized context vis-à-vis a concept of cosmopolitan ethics in coming to terms with the past, inspired by the legacy of the Polish-Jewish lawyer and refugee Raphael Lemkin (1900–1959). Moses considers the question why the notion of genocide, instead of forming a transnational reference for solidarity among societies experienced by colonialism, has been instrumentalized by predominantly nationalist approaches. He discusses the potential of transnational concepts of memory and identity vis-à-vis national instrumentalization.The winning of national independence after imperial rule entails a memory regime indentured to the cast of the liberation drama: wicked occupiers and fanatical settlers, heroic indigenous resistors and opportunistic collaborators. The redemptive culmination of the liberation struggle …

Round Table (Part 5): What’s Raphaël Lemkin Got to do with Genocide Studies?

Authors

Douglas Irvin-Erickson

Journal

Genocide Studies and Prevention: An International Journal

Published Date

2022

I would like to thank the editors of Genocide Studies and Prevention, especially JoAnn DiGeorgio-Lutz, for organizing this conversation and soliciting essays from such a highly distinguished panel of experts. Thank you, in turn, to Sarah Federman, Dirk Moses, Max Pensky, and Scott Straus for their generous reviews of my book, Raphaël Lemkin and the Concept of Genocide. In my response to each reviewer, I cover a lot of ground from my book—in the hope that this conversation can be assigned in the classroom.

Murder's moving target: The postwar struggle to define mass extermination.

Authors

Mark Roseman

Journal

TLS. Times Literary Supplement

Published Date

2022/2/25

To talk of genocide's" problems" might seem macabre, as if to concede that murder perhaps has its downsides. But this powerful, polemical, in some ways game-changing book has in its sights" genocide" as scholarly concept and in international law." Genocide", A. Dirk Moses argues, has proven a flawed and indeed harmful way of describing and prosecuting violence against civilians. By according so much weight to ethnic or racial hatred, it misrepresents the animus behind mass murder, and artificially separates genocidal killing from other atrocities. The problem is no accident: the genocide convention of 1948 was designed to avoid its signatories being indicted themselves. The more genocide has come to be the" crime of crimes", the more it has engendered fruitless efforts to shoehorn atrocities into the genocide paradigm to gain sympathy and support. The book aims to show why genocide has taken the shape …

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A. Dirk Moses FAQs

What is A. Dirk Moses's h-index at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill?

The h-index of A. Dirk Moses has been 26 since 2020 and 36 in total.

What are A. Dirk Moses's top articles?

The articles with the titles of

The Russian Invasion of Ukraine: Victims, Perpetrators, Justice, and the Question of Genocide

Security, genocide, and the holocaust: a forum

2 Genocide as a Category Mistake: Permanent Security and Mass Violence Against Civilians" Genocide" is a category mistake in the legal regime ostensibly protecting civil

The German Campaign against Cultural Freedom: Documenta 15 in Context

Introduction: The Russian Invasion of Ukraine

The International Administration of Territory as an Interim Peace

Patriotic history and the (re) nationalization of memory

Podcasts History of Ideas section, Review of Democracy

...

are the top articles of A. Dirk Moses at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

What are A. Dirk Moses's research interests?

The research interests of A. Dirk Moses are: International Relations

What is A. Dirk Moses's total number of citations?

A. Dirk Moses has 6,087 citations in total.

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