A Antonio Gonzalez-Prendes

A Antonio Gonzalez-Prendes

Wayne State University

H-index: 13

North America-United States

Professor Information

University

Wayne State University

Position

Associate Professor of Social Work

Citations(all)

653

Citations(since 2016)

354

Cited By

415

hIndex(all)

13

hIndex(since 2016)

11

i10Index(all)

17

i10Index(since 2016)

14

Email

University Profile Page

Wayne State University

Research & Interests List

mental health

Top articles of A Antonio Gonzalez-Prendes

Technological Advances in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy and Clinical Practice: Challenges in an Evolving Field

Technological innovations in cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) provide excellent opportunities for mental health clinicians to expand access to mental health treatment among culturally diverse and marginalized populations. This brief report highlights challenges that mental health clinicians encounter as they integrate technological innovations in CBT into their work with diverse clients and provides recommendations for addressing them. The authors identify five key challenges of using technology-driven CBT: development of the therapeutic alliance; potential fit for clients from culturally diverse backgrounds and marginalized groups; geographic and economic access; ethical and legal concerns; and competency in CBT practice, training, and supervision. Technological advances in CBT allow clinicians to treat more individuals from underserved communities. Existing challenges compel clinicians across disciplines …

Authors

Lisa A O’Donnell,Daphne M Brydon,Antonio González-Prendes

Publish By

American Psychiatric Association

Publish Date

2022/12/1

Pathways from Exposure to Community Violence to Bullying Victimization among African American Adolescents in Chicago’s Southside

The present study proposes and examines the pathways from exposure to community violence to bullying victimization through the influences of depression, exposure to peer delinquency, and drug use among 638 African American adolescents (aged 12–22) from low-resourced neighborhoods in Chicago’s Southside. The study found that African American adolescents who were exposed to community violence were likely at risk of bullying victimization, depression, exposure to peer delinquency, and drug use. Depression can heighten the risk of bullying victimization. These findings have implications for future research.

Authors

Jeoung Min Lee,Jun Sung Hong,Stella M Resko,A Antonio Gonzalez-Prendes,Dexter R Voisin

Journal

International journal of environmental research and public health

Publish By

MDPI

Publish Date

2022/8/2

Exploring whether talking with parents, siblings, and friends moderates the association between peer victimization and adverse psychosocial outcomes

The purpose of this study is to explore whether talking with parents, siblings, and friends will moderate the association between peer victimization and adverse outcomes (internalizing problems, alcohol/tobacco use, and delinquent friend affiliation). Data were derived from the Health Behavior in School-Aged Children, 2009 to 2010 cohort study in the United States (n = 12,642). Bivariate, logistic regression and ordinal least squares regression analyses were conducted. Peer victimization was found to be associated with all the adverse outcomes. Although ease of talking with parents had a lower likelihood of alcohol/tobacco use, it increased alcohol/tobacco risk when peer victimization increased. Ease of talking with friends showed a higher likelihood of alcohol/tobacco use, but the likelihood was lower when peer victimization increased. Ease of talking with parents and ease of talking with friends both lowered the …

Authors

Jun Sung Hong,Saijun Zhang,A Antonio Gonzalez-Prendes,Maha Albdour

Journal

Journal of interpersonal violence

Publish By

SAGE Publications

Publish Date

2021/12

Ecological correlates of bullying and peer victimization among urban African American adolescents

Adolescent bullying is a concern for adolescents, parents, teachers, school officials, and the general public. The purpose of the study is to apply Bronfenbrenner's ecological systems perspective and explore factors that are correlated with bullying perpetration and victimization among 638 urban African American adolescents in Chicago's Southside. Bullying victimization and perpetration are found to be influenced by microsystem-level factors, such as exposure to delinquent peers, teacher support, and neighborhood disorganization. An intervention strategy that involves teachers is particularly important. Anti-bullying intervention and prevention programs in urban schools need to account for the unique situations of urban African American adolescents.

Authors

Jeoung Min Lee,Jun Sung Hong,Stella M Resko,A Antonio Gonzalez-Prendes,Dexter R Voisin

Journal

The Journal of Educational Research

Publish By

Routledge

Publish Date

2021/8/19

Pathways from bullying victimization to suicidal thoughts among urban African American adolescents: Implications for nurse practitioners

Purpose Children and adolescents who are victimized by their peers are at an elevated risk of suicidal thoughts and behaviors. Bullying and suicide are major public health concerns; however, studies have not fully addressed the link between peer victimization and suicidal behavior among urban African American youth. The current study proposed and explored the pathways from peer victimization to suicidal thoughts via internalizing behaviors (i.e., low self‐esteem, depression, and hopelessness). Design and Methods The sample consisted of 638 African American adolescents (aged 12–22) from low‐income communities in Chicago's Southside. A path model using the structural equation model was employed, controlling for biological sex, age, and government assistance. Results The study found that victims of bullying are likely to develop low self‐esteem and depression, and depression can contribute to …

Authors

Jeoung Min Lee,Jun Sung Hong,Stella M Resko,A Antonio Gonzalez‐Prendes,Dexter R Voisin

Journal

Journal of child and adolescent psychiatric nursing

Publish Date

2021/8

Correlates of school bullying victimization among Black/White biracial adolescents: Are they similar to their monoracial Black and White peers?

Guided by the social‐ecological perspective, we examined familial, peer, and school‐related predictors of bullying victimization among a large sample of U.S. White, Black, and biracial adolescents. Data were drawn from the Health Behavior in School‐aged Children study, drawn from adolescents who self‐identified as White, Black, or biracial. Of the total sample, 3211 were White, 1188 were Black, and 175 were biracial. Adolescents completed measures of bullying victimization, perceptions of family relations, peer relationships, and school connectedness. Biracial students reported more bullying victimization than White and Black students. For biracial adolescents, family affluence off, and negative perceptions of other students were both found to be positively associated with victimization. For Whites, age, difficulty in talking with parents, parents sometimes like me to make my own decision, parents almost never …

Authors

Jun Sung Hong,Yueqi Yan,A Antonio Gonzalez‐Prendes,Dorothy L Espelage,Paula Allen‐Meares

Journal

Psychology in the Schools

Publish Date

2021/3

Trauma: Contemporary directions in trauma theory, research, and practice

Note: Figures and tables are indicated by an f or at following the page number. abandonment, 116, 225 abreaction, 4, 69, 76, 95 acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), 14, 142, 145–146 access hypothesis, 21 acute stress disorder (ASD), 170 Adaptive Disclosure Method, 282 Adult Attachment Interview (AAI), 111, 124–127, 128–131 affect, 97–98, 105 affect regulation, 13, 105, 117–120, 134; brain and, 132; disruption-repair cycles, 119; infant self-regulation, 119; mutual regulation, 118–119; in secure, avoidant, and anxious individuals, 120; self-regulation strategies, 120 African American women, 312–333; beauty standards, 321–322, 326; Black feminist thought, 325; colorism and, 321–322; convict lease, 314–315; demeaning language descriptors, 316–317; disproportionate incarceration of, 312, 315–316, 324, 329; formerly-incarcerated women, qualitative study, 325–328; formerly-incarcerated women …

Authors

Jerrold Brandell,Shoshana Ringel

Publish By

Columbia University Press

Publish Date

2019/12/31

Cognitive-behavioral therapy

a. antonio gonzalez-prendes, stella resko, and caitlin m. cassady cognitive-behavioral therapies (cbt) have garnered a substantial body of research establishing them as effective interventions to treat trauma in adults, children, and adolescents (Cukor et al. 2009; Cusack et al. 2016; Ehlers et al. 2010; Hofmann et al. 2012; Kar 2011). Cognitive-behavioral approaches are recommended for the treatment of trauma by the Department of Veterans Affairs and Department of Defense’s (VA/DoD) Clinical Practice Guidelines (2017) and by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE)(2005). This chapter pre sents an overview of leading cognitive-behavioral therapy models used in the treatment of traumatized individuals. They include cognitive therapy/reframing, or CT (which includes the Ehlers and Clark model and cognitive-processing therapy, or CPT), exposure therapies (which include prolonged …

Authors

A Antonio González-Prendes,Stella Resko,Caitlin M Cassady

Publish By

Columbia University Press

Publish Date

2019/12/31

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