A Horning

A  Horning

University of Massachusetts Lowell

H-index: 13

North America-United States

Professor Information

University

University of Massachusetts Lowell

Position

Assistant Professor School of Criminology & Justice Studies

Citations(all)

710

Citations(since 2016)

375

Cited By

490

hIndex(all)

13

hIndex(since 2016)

11

i10Index(all)

15

i10Index(since 2016)

15

Email

University Profile Page

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Research & Interests List

Criminology

Human Trafficking

Risk

Illicit Labor and Masculinity

Violent Crime

Professor FAQs

What is A Horning's h-index at University of Massachusetts Lowell?

The h-index of A Horning has been 11 since 2016 and 13 in total.

What are A Horning's research interests?

The research interests of A Horning are: Criminology, Human Trafficking, Risk, Illicit Labor and Masculinity, Violent Crime

What is A Horning's total number of citations?

A Horning has 710 citations in total.

Top articles of A Horning

Public Perceptions of the Police During COVID-19: A Cross-National Analysis

Using cross-national data collected during the pandemic, this study examines factors influencing public willingness to obey and cooperate with police during the COVID-19 pandemic. Data for the study were garnered using web-based surveys, which yielded about 500 participants from the U.S., India, Brazil, Kenya, and several European countries. OLS results revealed that police legitimacy remains a crucial predictor of public willingness to obey and cooperate with the police. However, fears experienced during the pandemic failed to directly predict public's obligation to obey the police and their willingness to cooperate with the police. Interestingly, fear had an indirect effect on the relationship between police legitimacy and the obligation to obey and cooperate with the police. Conceptualizations of police legitimacy should continue to be tested, alternative versions of surveying without the limitations of COVID-19 …

Authors

Joselyne L Chenane,Amber Horning,Sean Perry,Catherine Stevens

Journal

Criminal Justice Review

Publish By

SAGE Publications

Publish Date

2023/9/12

The COVID-19 Pandemic: Trust in Authorities and Criminal Justice Systems

Shortly after March 13, 2020, the University of Massachusetts Lowell announced a grant for studies investigating the COVID-19 pandemic. At that time, US citizens were fighting over and hoarding toilet paper. Many seemed anxious about the shutdown with schools and workplaces closing and the public receiving indeterminate stay-at-home orders. Additionally, the US culture wars and distrust of the government from both sides contributed to what could ignite the powder keg. The possibility of public protests, riots, and widespread unrest seemed inevitable. Further, there was no vaccine, scientific predictions that vaccine approval was years if not decades away, and there was the element of virus mutations. Each country grappled with how authorities would handle the regulations related to COVID-19 and how the public would respond to these rapid, stressful impositions. Given Dr. Chenane’s expertise in policing and …

Authors

Amber Horning,Joselyne L Chenane

Journal

Criminal Justice Review

Publish By

SAGE Publications

Publish Date

2023/8/15

Intergenerational Pathways into Family Sex Market Facilitation

Prior studies have found that 15–31% of sex market facilitators (SMFs) experienced family trafficking, and this was a primary route of market entrance (Dank et al., 2014), yet researchers have not thoroughly explored this social problem. We interviewed 24 SMFs exposed to facilitation through family, starting as teenagers. We qualitatively explored the accounts using the Grounded Theory (G.T.) approach (Glaser & Strauss, ), evaluating patterns to their entrance story using the sensitizing concept of “agency.” Our sample consisted of SMFs experiencing structural disadvantage. Their positionality informed their formulations of their entrance, ranging from family coercion to cooperative learning. Their negative formulations centered on being denied a childhood, exposure to negative stimuli, physical or sexual abuse, unconventional relationships with caregivers, strained relationships with traditional family and family …

Authors

Amber Horning,Michelle Poirier,Sara Jordenö

Journal

Victims & Offenders

Publish By

Routledge

Publish Date

2023/4/19

Swedish civil society mobilises in response to refugees’‘bare life’

In 2015, Sweden welcomed asylum-seekers from the mass exodus in what became known as the ‘European refugee crisis.’ However, as Swedish public perceptions of refugees shifted from sympathy to fear, the government enacted policy changes that eroded unaccompanied minor refugees’ (UMRs) rights. After witnessing refugees’ ‘bare life’ by seeing them denied politicised citizens’ rights, Sweden's civil society mobilised to assist these vulnerable young people. This paper focuses on what causes citizens to mobilise into humanitarian actors. We interviewed nineteen members of a helping network called Vi Står Inte Ut (We Can't Stand It), investigating their reasons for mobilising. Using sentiment analysis, we identified ‘high points’ or salient experiences by evaluating participants’ sentiments and linguistic cues, with many centreing on witnessing bare life. Some participants were activated through individual …

Authors

Amber Horning,Sara Jordenö,Catherine Stevens,Tanja Dejanova

Journal

European Journal of Social Work

Publish By

Routledge

Publish Date

2023/3/25

Rules, gender dynamics, and structure of sex market facilitators

This paper explores sex market facilitators’ (SMFs’) sex trade rules or 'facilitation styles,' work dyads, the use of violence, and attitudes about sex workers. We interviewed 37 SMFs in New York City who facilitated sex work 'long-term' (for at least five years). SMFs exhibited a range of trade rules, many of which were about maintaining control over the work setting and sex workers. Those who worked in groups of two or more had more controlling styles that were rarely conflict-free. SMFs whose operations had more organizational structure often used main sex workers as extensions of control and used violence to enforce rules. Those with controlling behaviors justified them in gendered ways, e.g., sex workers’ competency to do their jobs, manage their own money, and organize their lives. In contrast, SMFs with less controlling styles did not rely on violence and often included sex workers in decisions. Many 'long-term' …

Authors

Amber Horning,Michelle Poirier,Roisin Bermingham,Christopher Thomas

Publish By

Springer US

Publish Date

2022/12/19

Mapmaking as visual storytelling: the movement and emotion of managing sex work in the urban landscape

This paper explores an interdisciplinary approach that researchers can use to understand how people feel about their movement in the cityscape and their risk-taking activities by visualizing it. Author 1, a visual artist, and Author 2, a criminologist, used a psychogeography method where participants hand-drew maps of their everyday operations in the sex marketplace. Researchers, artists, and activists have used mapmaking to elucidate how individuals conceptualize physical space and place or their subjective, emotional relationship to the city's geography. Psychogeographers Lynch and Debord have used it to understand how participants feel about moving, inhabiting, navigating risk, and subverting space in the metropolis. We use this method as a vehicle to show how sex market facilitators’ imagine the physical geographic space where they work in the nighttime economy, their embodiment in managing a …

Authors

Sara Jordenö,Amber Horning

Journal

Crime, Law and Social Change

Publish By

Springer Netherlands

Publish Date

2022/11/19

Pimps” Self-presentations in the Interview Setting:‘Good Me,’‘Bad Me,’and ‘Badass Me

Using a mixed-method approach, we explored how 85 sex market facilitators used neutralization and subcultural discourse to present themselves in the interview setting. We used non-metric, Multidimensional Scaling (MDS) to test discursive themes that resulted in a three-fold model with the themes ‘good,’’bad,’ and ‘badass me’ with externalizing and internalizing approaches. The ‘good me’ subtype focused on fundamentally being a ”nice guy” but blaming acts on oppression. ‘Bad me” focused on being ”innately bad” but blaming outside factors and neutralizing ‘bad me.’ ‘Badass me’ centered on high-status feelings of pimping but also expressing guilt about it. This model may be helpful for researchers or practitioners interviewing or working with sex market facilitators, such as pimps or sex traffickers.

Authors

Amber Horning,Roisin Bermingham,Julie Sriken,Christopher Thomas

Journal

Journal of Human Trafficking

Publish By

Routledge

Publish Date

2022/5/29

Oblivious ‘Sex Traffickers’: Challenging stereotypes and the fairness of US trafficking laws

In this paper, we explore third parties who unexpectedly fell within the legal definition of a sex trafficker. The anti-trafficking lobby and media stories frequently portray traffickers as organised, psychopathic, violent, and child kidnappers. We dismantle these depictions by showing the unexpected people who qualify as traffickers. This paper incorporates findings from two studies involving eighty-five third parties in New York City and forty-nine in Chicago. We analyse how teenagers, drivers, and boyfriends qualify as traffickers under US law. We find that two-thirds of them hold inaccurate views about the difference between sex trafficking and facilitating prostitution. Trafficking can be incidental or temporary, and traffickers in these samples were often oblivious to their legal status, potentially resulting in lengthy prison sentences. We conclude by calling for differential sentencing based on traffickers’ age, and awareness campaigns designed to alert third parties of the legal distinctions between pandering and sex trafficking.

Authors

Amber Horning,Loretta Stalans

Journal

Anti-trafficking review

Publish Date

2022/4/19

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