The Callander (Auchenlaich) moraine: a new site report for the Western Highland Boundary block of the Quaternary of Scotland Geological Conservation Review (GCR)

Proceedings of the Geologists' Association

Published On 2021/2/1

The Callander Moraine (also known locally as the Auchenlaich Moraine) is an exceptionally well-preserved glacial landform on the outskirts of the town of Callander, in the council district of Stirling. It is part of an assemblage of neighbouring glacial landforms and sedimentary sequences which include eskers, kame terraces and kettle holes. When viewed both individually and together these features provide evidence for the interpretation of the nature, timing and extent of an ice margin at one of the south-eastern limits of the main icefield that occupied the Western Highlands during the Loch Lomond Readvance (Lowe, 1993), the last episode of glacial expansion to affect Scotland. This site description forms a new inclusion of the site into the Quaternary of Scotland Geological Conservation Review (GCR). The Callander Moraine is a key feature because it one of the best constrained of the ice limits dating to this …

Journal

Proceedings of the Geologists' Association

Published On

2021/2/1

Volume

132

Issue

1

Page

24-33

Authors

John Lowe

John Lowe

Royal Holloway, University of London

Position

H-Index(all)

62

H-Index(since 2020)

26

I-10 Index(all)

0

I-10 Index(since 2020)

0

Citation(all)

0

Citation(since 2020)

0

Cited By

0

Research Interests

Quaternary science

Palaeoclimates

Tephrochronology

Dating methods

Other Articles from authors

John Lowe

John Lowe

Royal Holloway, University of London

BMC medical research methodology

The development and acceptability of an educational and training intervention for recruiters to neonatal trials: the TRAIN project

BackgroundSuboptimal or slow recruitment affects 30–50% of trials. Education and training of trial recruiters has been identified as one strategy for potentially boosting recruitment to randomised controlled trials (hereafter referred to as trials). The Training tRial recruiters, An educational INtervention (TRAIN) project was established to develop and assess the acceptability of an education and training intervention for recruiters to neonatal trials. In this paper, we report the development and acceptability of TRAIN.MethodsTRAIN involved three sequential phases, with each phase contributing information to the subsequent phase(s). These phases were 1) evidence synthesis (systematic review of the effectiveness of training interventions and a content analysis of the format, content, and delivery of identified interventions), 2) intervention development using a Partnership (co-design/co-creation) approach, and 3 …

2023/11/11

Article Details
John Lowe

John Lowe

Royal Holloway, University of London

Land

Testing the effect of relative pollen productivity on the REVEALS model: A validated reconstruction of Europe-Wide Holocene vegetation

Reliable quantitative vegetation reconstructions for Europe during the Holocene are crucial to improving our understanding of landscape dynamics, making it possible to assess the past effects of environmental variables and land-use change on ecosystems and biodiversity, and mitigating their effects in the future. We present here the most spatially extensive and temporally continuous pollen-based reconstructions of plant cover in Europe (at a spatial resolution of 1° × 1°) over the Holocene (last 11.7 ka BP) using the ‘Regional Estimates of VEgetation Abundance from Large Sites’ (REVEALS) model. This study has three main aims. First, to present the most accurate and reliable generation of REVEALS reconstructions across Europe so far. This has been achieved by including a larger number of pollen records compared to former analyses, in particular from the Mediterranean area. Second, to discuss methodological issues in the quantification of past land cover by using alternative datasets of relative pollen productivities (RPPs), one of the key input parameters of REVEALS, to test model sensitivity. Finally, to validate our reconstructions with the global forest change dataset. The results suggest that the RPPs.st1 (31 taxa) dataset is best suited to producing regional vegetation cover estimates for Europe. These reconstructions offer a long-term perspective providing unique possibilities to explore spatial-temporal changes in past land cover and biodiversity.

John Lowe

John Lowe

Royal Holloway, University of London

Acknowledgment to the Reviewers of Quaternary in 2022

High-quality academic publishing is built on rigorous peer review. Quaternary was able to uphold its high standards for published papers due to the outstanding efforts of our reviewers. Thanks to the efforts of our reviewers in 2022, the median time to first decision was 28.5 days and the median time to publication was 94 days. Regardless of whether the articles they examined were ultimately published, the editors would like to express their appreciation and thank the following reviewers for the time and dedication that they have shown Quaternary:

John Lowe

John Lowe

Royal Holloway, University of London

Journal of Quaternary Science

Ice‐sheet deglaciation and Loch Lomond Readvance in the eastern Cairngorms: implications of a Lateglacial sediment record from Glen Builg

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John Lowe

John Lowe

Royal Holloway, University of London

Response to comment by Dr. R. Cornish concerning the publication by Palmer et al.(2020)

We thank Dr. Cornish for his' comment'piece prompted by our revised model for the timing of ice build-up and retreat during the Loch Lomond ('Younger Dryas') Stadial (LLS) in Glens Roy and Spean (Palmer et al., 2020), iconic valleys that contain suites of landforms that have stimulated debate for over two centuries. Our new interpretations are based on a high-precision varve chronology (the Lochaber Varve Chronology, or LMVC19) anchored to an absolute timescale by the Vedde Ash, a tephra isochron widely-employed in NW Europe which was detected within the varve sequence. These new results led us to challenge the model initially established by Sissons (1978, 1979a) concerning the relative timing of:(i) the expansion of glacier ice into the Spean and Roy catchments, and (ii) the order of the subsequent retreat of the ice margins. In responding to Cornish's comments we are mindful of the complexity of the …

John Lowe

John Lowe

Royal Holloway, University of London

The Quaternary of the West Grampian Highlands: Field Guide

The Kinghouse 2 record for timing the deglaciation of the Rannoch basin

The Kinghouse 2 record for timing the deglaciation of the Rannoch basin - ePrints - Newcastle University Newcastle University Toggle Main Menu Toggle Search Home Browse Latest Stats Policies About Home Browse Latest Policies About Open Access padlock ePrints Browse by author The Kinghouse 2 record for timing the deglaciation of the Rannoch basin Lookup NU author(s): Dr Roseanna MayfieldORCiD Downloads Full text for this publication is not currently held within this repository. Alternative links are provided below where available. Publication metadata Author(s): Lowe JJ, Matthews IP, Mayfield R, Lincoln P, Palmer AP, Staff R, Timms RGO Editor(s): Palmer, AP; Lowe, JJ; Matthews, IP; Publication type: Book Chapter Publication status: Published Book Title: The Quaternary of the West Grampian Highlands: Field Guide Year: 2021 Pages: 12-27 Print publication date: 15/09/2021 Acceptance date: 15/09/…

John Lowe

John Lowe

Royal Holloway, University of London

A revised chronology for the growth and demise of Loch Lomond Readvance (‘Younger Dryas’) ice lobes in the Lochaber area, Scotland

We present a revised varve chronology for the duration of ice-dammed lakes that formed in the Lochaber district, Scotland, during the Loch Lomond (‘Younger Dryas’) Stadial. We analysed new varved sequences and combined them with existing varve records to develop the Lochaber Master Varve Chronology 2019 (LMVC19), published here for the first time. It spans an interval of 518 ± 18 vyrs and is considered more secure than its predecessors because: (i) it is anchored by a more robust record of the Vedde Ash, which is dated to 12,043 ± 43 cal yr BP; and (ii) it provides revised estimates of the timings of key regional palaeoclimatic shifts that are fully compatible with those inferred from independently-dated, non-varved records obtained from neighbouring sites. The new results indicate that the Lochaber ice-dammed lakes existed between ∼12,135 and 11,618 ± 61 cal yr BP, but the pattern of glacier advance …

2020/11/15

Article Details
John Lowe

John Lowe

Royal Holloway, University of London

Quaternary

Detection and characterisation of Eemian Marine Tephra layers within the sapropel s5 sediments of the Aegean and Levantine Seas

The Eemian was the last interglacial period (~130 to 115 ka BP) to precede the current interglacial. In Eastern Mediterranean marine sediments, it is marked by a well-developed and organic-rich “sapropel” layer (S5), which is thought to reflect an intensification and northward migration of the African monsoon rain belt over orbital timescales. However, despite the importance of these sediments, very little proxy-independent stratigraphic information is available to enable rigorous correlation of these sediments across the region. This paper presents the first detailed study of visible and non-visible (cryptotephra) layers found within these sediments at three marine coring sites: ODP Site 967B (Levantine Basin), KL51 (South East of Crete) and LC21 (Southern Aegean Sea). Major element analyses of the glass component were used to distinguish four distinct tephra events of Santorini (e.g., Vourvoulos eruption) and possible Anatolian provenance occurring during the formation of S5. Interpolation of core chronologies provides provisional eruption ages for the uppermost tephra (unknown Santorini, 121.8 ± 2.9 ka) and lowermost tephra (Anatolia or Kos/Yali/Nisyros, 126.4 ± 2.9 ka). These newly characterised tephra deposits have also been set into the regional tephrostratigraphy to illustrate the potential to precisely synchronise marine proxy records with their terrestrial counterparts, and also contribute to the establishment of a more detailed volcanic history of the Eastern Mediterranean.

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Mohamed Abou Heleika

Minia University

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Roy E Smith

Roy E Smith

University of Portsmouth

Proceedings of the Geologists' Association

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Pedro Proença Cunha

Pedro Proença Cunha

Universidade de Coimbra

Proceedings of the Geologists' Association

Quaternary earth-science and Palaeolithic conservation initiatives in the Tejo (Tagus), Portugal: comparison with the Lower Thames, UK

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David Bridgland

David Bridgland

Durham University

Proceedings of the Geologists' Association

Valuing the Quaternary–Nature conservation and geoheritage

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