Talking back: Trans youth and resilience in action

Journal of LGBT Youth

Published On 2022/1/2

In 2015 the Gender Vectors research team received a major research grant to conduct research with and about transgender youth in the Greater Vancouver Area. A unique aspect of this research project involved combining social action research with the development of a prototype of a video game as a knowledge translation tool to depict the life experiences of trans youth. We draw on transformative gender justice theory to document and address the diminished life chances of and the need to promote resilience among trans youth in the region and more broadly, across Canada and the United States. This article provides an overview of the research project and concludes by identifying key insights relating to resiliency that resulted from 15 narrative interviews with transgender youth, focus group meetings with the Project’s Youth Advisory Council, and dialog from an intergenerational workshop for transgender youth …

Journal

Journal of LGBT Youth

Published On

2022/1/2

Volume

19

Issue

1

Page

1-30

Authors

Travers, A.

Travers, A.

Simon Fraser University

Position

H-Index(all)

16

H-Index(since 2020)

12

I-10 Index(all)

0

I-10 Index(since 2020)

0

Citation(all)

0

Citation(since 2020)

0

Cited By

0

Research Interests

gender transgender sport

University Profile Page

Sharalyn Jordan

Sharalyn Jordan

Simon Fraser University

Position

Assistant Professor Counselling Psychology Faculty of Education

H-Index(all)

10

H-Index(since 2020)

8

I-10 Index(all)

0

I-10 Index(since 2020)

0

Citation(all)

0

Citation(since 2020)

0

Cited By

0

Research Interests

Mental Health

Gender

Sexuality

Forced Migration

University Profile Page

Kathleen Reed

Kathleen Reed

Vancouver Island University

Position

Assessment & Data Librarian ; PhD Student Simon Fraser University

H-Index(all)

5

H-Index(since 2020)

5

I-10 Index(all)

0

I-10 Index(since 2020)

0

Citation(all)

0

Citation(since 2020)

0

Cited By

0

Research Interests

transgender and non-binary youth

surveillance

privacy

digital humanities

research methods

University Profile Page

Other Articles from authors

Travers, A.

Travers, A.

Simon Fraser University

Contemporary Clinical Trials

Mitigation through on-site testing & education among formerly incarcerated individuals against Covid-19–The MOSAIC study: Design and rationale

BackgroundMany of the largest COVID-19 outbreaks in the United States have occurred at carceral facilities. Criminal legal system (CLS)-involved individuals typically face structural barriers accessing medical care post-release. Improving COVID-19 testing and education for CLS-involved individuals could improve health outcomes for this vulnerable population and the communities to which they return. Community-based organizations (CBO) and community health workers (CHWs) fill care gaps by connecting CLS-involved individuals with essential re-entry services. The MOSAIC study will: 1) test an onsite CHW-led SARS-CoV-2 testing and education intervention in a reentry CBO and 2) model the cost-effectiveness of this intervention compared to standard care.MethodsWe will recruit 250 CLS-involved individuals who have left incarceration in the prior 90 days. Participants will be randomized to receive onsite …

Kathleen Reed

Kathleen Reed

Vancouver Island University

Sociological Perspectives

Moral Panic and Electric Micromobilities: Seeking Space for Mobility Justice

This article makes the case that electric micromobilities (EMMs) are the site of a moral panic and employs the lens of mobility justice to explain it. Through analysis of scholarly and media discourse, interviews with, and social media content produced by, EMM riders (eriders), and the auto ethnographic experiences of the lead author as an electric unicycle rider in daily life, as a participant in online and offline “erider” communities, and as a food delivery worker, we reinforce the conclusion that alternate mobilities face an uphill battle in gaining legitimacy and inclusion in transportation policy and infrastructure. While this is not a new finding—alternate mobilities have a long history of being demonized and excluded—this article offers insight into how individuals who find themselves unwitting scapegoats in conflicts over public space consciously engage in deliberate actions to resist EMM panic and achieve greater …

Kathleen Reed

Kathleen Reed

Vancouver Island University

Marine Biology

Localised mass mortality of giant California sea cucumbers in Western Canada

Mass-mortality events are seldom reported in sea cucumbers (Echinodermata: Holothuria), but here we document a localized mass die-off of giant California sea cucumbers (Apostichopus californicus) in Western Canada from August to October 2021. We recruited volunteer divers to count wasting and healthy sea cucumbers, resulting in observations spanning 500 km of coastline. Reports of dead and wasting sea cucumbers were restricted to Nanoose Bay, BC (Snaw-naw-as First Nation territory, 49°17'N, 124°08'W), with the exception of a single report from Hornby Island, some 55 km away. In Nanoose Bay in 2021, up to 94% of observed sea cucumbers were affected, with healthy sea cucumbers generally observed below 16 m. Following reports of wasting sea cucumbers, population abundance declined sharply. We returned in September 2022 to survey a subset of sites and observed similarly spatially isolated …

Kathleen Reed

Kathleen Reed

Vancouver Island University

Elder abuse in the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender plus communities (Evidence Summary)

This evidence brief summarizes the literature on the abuse of older adults who identify as 2SLGBT+(Two-Spirit, lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, queer plus) published in the past decade (2013-2023), and discusses policy implications.

Kathleen Reed

Kathleen Reed

Vancouver Island University

Evidence Brief: Elder Abuse in the 2SLGBTQ+ Community

This knowledge synthesis reports on the literature on the abuse of older adults who identify as 2SLGBT+ (Two-Spirit, lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, queer plus) published in the past decade (2013-2023). Although there is not a great deal of literature prior to 2013, what we do have indicates that 2SLGBT+ older adults face particular vulnerabilities that can make them experience elder abuse in ways that are specific to their communities and that can present additional barriers to their health and well-being. Objectives (1) synthesize existing knowledge related to 2SLGBTQ+ elder abuse and determine knowledge gaps (2) identify and evaluate the nature of the academic literature, including methodologies and data sources; (3) create an evidence-based agenda for future research and advocacy in the area of 2SLGBTQ+ elder abuse; and (4) where evidence and data are lacking, our work will highlight the gaps in order to help shape future data policies and research agendas.

Kathleen Reed

Kathleen Reed

Vancouver Island University

A scoping review of good methodological practices in research involving transgender, non-binary, and two-spirit youth

Transgender, non-binary, two-spirit, and other gender non-conforming (GNC) youth have been the focus of increasing scholarly attention over the past decade. A scoping review method was applied to this growing body of literature to identify good practices and important themes in conducting research with GNC youth. A body of non-clinical, English-language scholarship was identified utilizing keywords relating to GNC youth, methods, and methodologies via searches in 33 databases, 3 specific journals, and other online sources. These works were then analyzed for good practices, with themes emerging related to institutional review boards (IRBs) and assent/consent, advisory boards and community involvement, recruitment, identity descriptions, adultism, youth agency and voice, intersectionality, knowledge mobilization, and researcher reflexivity.

Travers, A.

Travers, A.

Simon Fraser University

Advancing feminist innovation in sport studies: a transdisciplinary dialogue on gender, health and wellbeing

Athlete health and wellbeing requires a holistic, multidimensional approach to understanding, supporting, and treating individual athletes. Building more supportive, inclusive, and equitable environments for the health and wellbeing of women and gender expansive people further requires gender-responsive approaches that promote broader cultural change. Feminist sport and exercise medicine practitioners, sports scientists, and social science researchers are increasingly coming together in their efforts to do this work, however working across disciplines inevitably includes an array of ontological, epistemological and political challenges. In this paper we offer a curated 'dialogue' with a group of feminist scholars from across these disciplines, bringing them together to discuss some of the most pressing gendered issues in sport today (i.e., ACL injury, concussion, menstruation in sport, mental health, gender categories). In so doing, we amplify the voices of those working (empirically and clinically) at the disciplinary intersections of gender, sport and health, and learn about some of the current and future possibilities for transdisciplinary innovations and strategies for building (responsiveness to) cultural change.

Sharalyn Jordan

Sharalyn Jordan

Simon Fraser University

Sexualities

Another perspective: Reflections on using qualitative video-recall procedures in sexual communication research with partnered gay men

As sex cultures evolve in complexity, so too must our research procedures. We introduce qualitative video-recall procedures and discuss the unique opportunities they present in the study of sexual communication. In a pilot study, three diverse gay male couples had video-recorded conversations about aspects of their sexual relationships that they wished to change or explore. Partners then individually watched and reflected on their partnered conversations during open-ended video-recall interviews. We discuss how reflexively engaging with these research procedures enabled the first author to (1) confront dominant and restrictive assumptions about partnered sex, (2) observe how interpersonal dynamics shape sexual communication, and (3) enhance cultural reflexivity.

Kathleen Reed

Kathleen Reed

Vancouver Island University

Youth and Public Transit: A Knowledge Synthesis of Recent Publications (SSHRC Forum Presentation)

Historically, youth (13-25) have been one of the most active user groups of public transit in Canada, accounting for one-third of ridership nation-wide, and up to two-thirds in cities such as Moose Jaw, SK and Red Deer, AB (Canadian Urban Transit Association, 2004). Despite their high usage of public transportation, youth as a specific category of riders have received an underwhelming amount of focus by academics and transit authorities. This report synthesizes the last ten years of evidence, policy, and pilot projects related to youth as a public transportation user group in order to provide an up-to-date summary of the state of knowledge in this area. Youth and public transportation research is identified and evaluated, including data sources and gaps. Media coverage of the issue is also considered, as many of the concerns of youth, public debates, and pilot programs related to youth and public transit are only referenced in this format. The final section of this work consists of an evidence-based agenda for future research and policy, with an eye toward enhancing the equity of access to transit systems for youth riders.

2021/12/14

Article Details
Kathleen Reed

Kathleen Reed

Vancouver Island University

Transportation Planning, Policy, and Electric Micro-Mobilities: A Knowledge Synthesis of Recent Publications

This SSHRC-funded (Grant #972-2020-1009) scoping review synthesizes existing research (2010-2021) related to both private and shared electric micro-mobilities (i.e. e-bikes, e-scooters, e-unicycles, e-skateboards). It considers themes such as: rider demographics, usage, and motivations; mobility justice; benefits of and barriers to EMM use; safety and injuries; modal shift among forms of transportation; rider satisfaction with mode choice; environmental impact; conflict and controversy; EMM pilot programs; and EMM integration, legislation, and policy recommendations. Aside from scholarship, media reports are also included, in order to speak to the environment in which the research takes place.

Kathleen Reed

Kathleen Reed

Vancouver Island University

Free and Reduced-fare Public Transit for Youth (Evidence Brief)

This two page evidence brief summarizes the academic literature and media reports of free and fare-reduced public transit for youth. Motivations, Canadian initiatives, and assessment of programs are considered.

2021/12/15

Article Details
Kathleen Reed

Kathleen Reed

Vancouver Island University

Youth and Public Transit (Evidence Brief)

This two page evidence brief summarizes recent (2010-2021) literature related to youth and public transit. Major themes include demand, barriers, youth advocacy, various types of passes (ie, U-PASS, free or reduced-fares), and active transportation. A list of recommendations for transit planners and policy-makers is included.

2021/12/15

Article Details
Kathleen Reed

Kathleen Reed

Vancouver Island University

Evidence Brief: Youth and Public Transit

This short report summarizes the literature related to youth and transit, with a focus on demand, barriers, youth advocacy, various types of passes (i.e., U-PASS, free or reduced-fares), and active transportation.

2021/12/14

Article Details
Kathleen Reed

Kathleen Reed

Vancouver Island University

Free and Reduced-Fare Transportation for Youth

This short report summarizes the literature related to free and reduced-fare transportation for youth, including motivations for such programs, Canadian initiatives, and assessments.

2021/12/14

Article Details
Kathleen Reed

Kathleen Reed

Vancouver Island University

Electric Micro-Mobilities Scoping Review [Data Set]

In 2020, the authors received funding from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada Knowledge Synthesis Grants: Mobility and Public Transit competition. The primary output made possible by this funding is a scoping review of literature on the subject of electric micro-mobilities (EMMs) published between 2010-2021. This Excel document logs all literature found in library databases, Google Scholar, and general Google searches. Each entry contains author(s), year, title, database/location, source type, country/region, city/province/state, and type(s) of EMM.

Travers, A.

Travers, A.

Simon Fraser University

Gender, diversity, and inclusion international workshop

Transgender children on the margins: Impacts of colonialism, racism, and poverty

Transgender children are to be found in every population of children, whether they make themselves visible or not. The trans kids who are visible tend to be disproportionately white, relatively wealthy, binary-conforming, and supported by activist parents. This chapter makes the case that social justice for all trans kids is impossible without targeting the interlocking systems of colonialism, white supremacy, capitalism, and national security state policies and institutions for transformative change. Putting the most vulnerable trans kids at the center of social change efforts is crucial to this project.Trans kids are present in every population whether they make themselves known or not. Educational scholar Mark Hellen (2009) observes that the majority of them are “nonapparent”(p. 92); they hide because they expect a lack of acceptance. This is the selfperpetuating logic of “the Thomas Theorem,” whereby “situations that are defined as real become real in their consequences”(Thomas & Thomas, 1928, p. 301). Ultimately, both visible and invisible trans kids are vulnerable to high-risk behavior, self-harm, and suicide. It is important to emphasize that it is not being transgender, per se, that increases the likelihood of self-harm and suicide; rather, it is cultural and social prejudice that does the damage. Trans kids represent normal and healthy gender variation and are not new, as Jules Gill-Peterson (2018) documents in her recent book, Histories of the Transgender Child. I should know; I was one of them.

Sharalyn Jordan

Sharalyn Jordan

Simon Fraser University

International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction

Intersectionality as an analytic framework for understanding the experiences of mental health stigma among racialized men

The objective of this research was to use intersectionality to explore Asian men’s experiences of stigma and mental illness to tease out the ways in which stigma of mental illness among Asian men is mediated by age, immigration experiences, sexual and gender identities, racism and racialization processes, normative expectations about masculinity, and material inequality. The data for this research are based on a 4-year, multi-site (Calgary, Vancouver, and Toronto) mixed-methods intervention study that evaluated the effectiveness of interventions in reducing self and social mental health stigma among Asian men (Livingston et al. International Journal of Social Psychiatry 64, 679-689, 2018; Guruge et al. Contemporary Clinical Trials 71, 133–139, 2018). Participants were Asian men living with or affected by mental illness and community leaders interested in stigma reduction and advocacy. Quantitative survey data …

Other articles from Journal of LGBT Youth journal

Briana McGeough

Briana McGeough

University of California, Berkeley

Journal of LGBT Youth

School of social welfare transgender justice group: student-led advocacy to promote justice and equity for gender diverse college students

Transgender and gender diverse (TGD) social work students experience microaggressions on campuses, curricula that are often cissexist and stigmatizing, and a lack of inclusive facilities, like gender-neutral bathrooms. The Transgender Justice Group (TJG) was founded by students at a School of Social Welfare (SSW) to respond to these and other pressing issues on the campus of a public university in the Midwestern U.S. This report aims to describe the formation process and activities of the TJG and provide recommendations for students, staff, and faculty who are interested in creating similar groups at other universities. Students and supporting faculty used a nonhierarchical approach to define, strategize, and implement advocacy goals, including creating more trans-affirming classrooms and increasing positive and proactive administrative responses to recent harmful anti-trans laws. Strategies for achieving …

Maurice N. Gattis

Maurice N. Gattis

Virginia Commonwealth University

Journal of LGBT Youth

Three years of Camp Qmunity: an interdisciplinary LGBTQIA+ summer intensive program

LGBTQIA + college students are navigating a variety of social environments on college campuses. Faculty support, interaction with the LGBTQIA + community, and LGBTQIA + curriculum content are important ways that help support LGBTQIA + students thrive in college. Camp Qmunity is an interdisciplinary LGBTQIA + summer intensive program that allows students to interact with faculty, build community, and learn LGBTQIA + content. This report describes the intensive program that began during the summer of 2020 and continues today. Student evaluations indicated the program increased their knowledge of LGBTQIA + content, allowed them to learn from other students, and felt like the project that resulted from the intensive program was one of the best things they ever did. In the future student roles in the projects will be solidified earlier on in the program. The purpose of this report is to highlight the …

Lisa Platt

Lisa Platt

West Virginia University

Journal of LGBT Youth

The mental health needs of sexual and gender minority collegiate clients at university counseling centers

University counseling centers (UCCs) are an important resource for sexual and gender minority (SM/GM) students as they navigate their college experience. This study investigated the mental health needs of SM/GM collegiate clients in 2020-2021 as compared to the mental health needs of SM/GM collegiate clients in 2012-2015. The analyses also specifically explored the current mental health needs of asexual, pansexual, and gender non-binary collegiate clients. Data were from the Center for Collegiate Mental Health 2012-2015 and 2020-2021 academic years. Results indicate SM/GM identifying collegiate clients in 2020-2021 are younger, more racially diverse, reporting more mental health needs, and utilizing services at UCCs at double or triple the rate as compared to 2012-2015. In 2020-2021, all SM/GM clients had more mental health needs than their non-marginalized peers. Asexual and non-binary clients …

Kimberly Nelson, PhD, MPH

Kimberly Nelson, PhD, MPH

Boston University

Journal of LGBT Youth

Differences in the sexual health information parents/guardians give their adolescent sexual minority sons by outness

Parents and guardians are a potentially valuable source of sexual health information for adolescent sexual minority males (ASMM). The current study examines what sexual health topics ASMM report discussing with a parent/guardian and whether topics differ by outness about sexual attraction to other males. ASMM (N = 154; ages 14–17) in the United States completed the baseline of an online sexual health intervention pilot in 2020. They reported which of twelve sexual health topics they discussed with a parent/guardian and if they had disclosed their sexual attraction to other males. Associations between topics discussed and outness to a parent/guardian were examined with Firth logistic regression. Eighty-eight (57%) participants reported being out to a parent/guardian. Six sexual health topics were significantly more likely to be discussed if participants were out. The three categories with the largest …

You Fu

You Fu

University of Nevada, Reno

Journal of LGBT Youth

Sexual identity-behavior discordance and meeting 24-hour movement behavior recommendations in adolescents

The purpose of this study was to examine the association between sexual identity-behavior concordance and discordance with meeting recommendations for 24-hour movement behaviors in adolescents. Participants were US adolescents who reported a history of sexual partners from the 2015–2019 National Youth Risk Behavior Survey (N = 19688; 49.3% female). A sexual identity-behavior variable indicated response agreement (concordance) and disagreement (discordance) between self-reported sexual identity and the sex of sexual partners. The 24-hour movement behaviors included meeting recommendations for physical activity, screen use, and school night sleep. Sex-specific and weighted multivariable logistic regression models were used to analyze associations between sexual identity-behavior concordance and discordance with meeting recommendations for 24-hour movement behaviors …

Elizabeth R. Boskey

Elizabeth R. Boskey

Harvard University

Journal of LGBT Youth

“You can’t be deadnamed in a video game”: Transgender and gender diverse adolescents’ use of video game avatar creation for gender-affirmation and exploration

Transgender and gender diverse (TGD) adolescents experience mental health challenges at higher rates than cisgender peers due to a combination of minority stress and gender dysphoria. Many TGD youth use video games to cope with stress and access informal networks of support. However, very little is known about the potential positive influence avatar customization has for this group of youth. To address this gap in the literature, in-depth, semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with ten TGD adolescents about their experiences with avatar customization. Thematic analysis revealed four primary themes including that (1) video game avatar customization offers a low stakes environment for gender exploration, (2) avatars offer both internal and external validation of gender identity and transition goals, (3) avatars allow players to enact aspirational appearance goals, and (4) video games and …

Casey Burkholder

Casey Burkholder

University of New Brunswick

Journal of LGBT Youth

Doing it together, but in a queer way: joyful worldmaking with 2SLGBTQI+ folks in Atlantic Canada

This paper explores the joyful worldmaking that circulated between a group of 35 queer and trans adults and youth from across Atlantic Canada—New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and Newfoundland and Labrador—who came together in February 2023 for a do-it-yourself (DIY) archiving and artmaking workshop on unceded and unsurrendered Wolastoqiyik territory in Fredericton, New Brunswick—as part of an ongoing participatory visual research initiative called Pride/Swell+. Exploring this worldmaking through frameworks of queer joy, we ask: How does worldmaking circulate within the Pride/Swell + workshop space and archives? Why is queer and trans worldmaking valuable to 2SLGBTQI + youth? What is the importance in remembering and archiving the things that queer and trans folks are doing to craft their everyday lives? Through DIY artmaking and participatory methodologies, we …

Ryan B. Berke

Ryan B. Berke

Utah State University

Journal of LGBT Youth

LGBTQ+ engineering students’ recommendations for sustaining and supporting diversity in STEM

LGBTQ + engineering students in higher education face systemic challenges in their educational contexts because of interlocking systems of oppression that privilege majority identities. The current study uses thematic analysis to explore LGBTQ + graduate and undergraduate engineering students’ recommendations for supporting diverse students in engineering higher education programs. A sample of ten LGBTQ + engineering college students in the United States shared effective classroom norms and recommendations for integrating LGBTQ-informed content. Suggestions for higher education institutions revolved around increasing students’ feelings of safety or addressing feelings of unsafety in their educational contexts. Students cited community ignorance as well as invisibility/isolation as root causes of their dis-ease as LGBTQ + people in the engineering field. To that end, students suggested …

Alena Kuhlemeier

Alena Kuhlemeier

University of New Mexico

Journal of LGBT Youth

The impact of LGBTQ-inclusive practices on student suicidality in New Mexico high schools

Sexually and gender diverse (SGD) youth experience suicidality at high rates compared to their cisgender and heterosexual peers. This study sought to investigate the impact on SGD youth suicidality of schools’ implementation of policies and practices designed ameliorate disparities experienced by SGD youth. With data pooled from the 2017 and 2019 New Mexico Youth Risk and Resiliency Survey and School Health Profiles (N = 22,993), this study used hierarchical linear modeling to examine the impact of 4 strategies recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on suicidality among lesbian/gay, bisexual, questioning, and transgender/gender-diverse students. Attending a school with a genders and sexualities alliance (GSA) was associated with lower odds of reporting suicidal thoughts (aOR 0.70, SE = 0.18, p < 0.05) and suicide attempt(s) (aOR = 0.73, SE = 0.15, p < 0.05 …

Lida Anagnostaki

Lida Anagnostaki

National and Kapodistrian University of Athens

Journal of LGBT Youth

Lesbian-parent families in Greece: the experience of preschool and primary school teachers

The article aims to explore Greek preschool and primary school teachers’ experience regarding students coming from lesbian-parent families. In recent years, the composition of school classes in Greece has become more diverse. However, the inclusion of students and families from the LGBTQ+ community in the educational system and the teachers’ role in creating inclusive schools has not been systematically investigated. Six primary school teachers who had had experience with students from lesbian-parent families were interviewed. Their narratives were analyzed using interpretative phenomenological analysis, a qualitative research method which allows the in-depth examination of the participants’ experiences while simultaneously acknowledging the researcher’s active role. The analysis of the interviews yielded four themes (the “uncanny,” in the classroom, cooperation between teachers and lesbian …

Edward Ou Jin Lee

Edward Ou Jin Lee

Université de Montréal

Journal of LGBT Youth

Mamu: trans indigenous and two-spirit youth coming together to define their needs and to take action

Youth who are both trans and Indigenous, whether or not they identify as Two-Spirit experience multiple forms of structural violence at the intersection of gender and Indigeneity. Whether these young people live on or off reserve, the studies have highlighted specific challenges experienced in particular in connection with self-identification, conditions of significant poverty, violence, and lack of access to health care. health. This paper presents the results of an action research project using Talking Circles co-facilitated by an Elder and two Two-Spirit young people. Developed in collaboration with a local community organization the Talking Circles took place over a period of 21 meetings held between September 2021 and April 2022, in Tiohtià:ke (Montreal) and online. The participants of the Talking Circles discussed their most pressing issues, the underlying causes of these issues, and possible solutions to address …

Danielle Chiaramonte

Danielle Chiaramonte

Michigan State University

Journal of LGBT Youth

Breaking the binary: Restriction and reclamation of power among transgender and gender diverse young adults

Binary gender norms in the U.S. contribute to the systemic marginalization of transgender and gender diverse (TGD) individuals. These norms shape beliefs and assumptions about TGD young adults; inform the policies that govern their rights, the settings they occupy, and research conducted about them. Experiences based on binary conceptions of gender may leave TGD young adults feeling disempowered and require they develop resilient strategies to maintain or reclaim power and control over their lives and decisions. The purpose of this study was to explore the mechanisms through which TGD young adults (ages 18 to 24) demonstrate resilience and resist oppressive gender norms. In collaboration with a TGD young adult advisory team, we used a participatory focus group method (Youth GO) to engage TGD participants in critically examining power and powerlessness in the context of their multiple identities …

Shanna K. Kattari

Shanna K. Kattari

University of Michigan

Journal of LGBT Youth

‘I have had several providers who recognize my humanity’: exploring the overall health and positive healthcare interactions of transgender and gender diverse college students

To date, little research has focused on transgender and gender diverse (TGD) college students’ experiences with health services; most of the literature around TGD health focuses on barriers to care. During the 2021–22 academic year, a collective of researchers, university health service providers, and transgender/gender diverse community members collaborated to conduct a pilot study of TGD students (undergraduate and graduate) at the University of Michigan, on topics related to health, wellness, and their campus experience. This mixed-methods analysis investigates participants’ (N = 121) overall health, mental health, and access to trans-inclusive primary care providers, as well as self-reported qualitative responses regarding both how they take care of their health, and positive experiences in accessing beneficial and affirming health care. Students noted positive practices that we themed into concrete …

Morgan Polikoff

Morgan Polikoff

University of Southern California

Journal of LGBT Youth

Who wants to say ‘Gay?’Public opinion about LGBT issues in the curriculum

Public schools are currently a source of major political conflict, specifically with regard to topics related to LGBT representation in the curriculum. We report on a large nationally representative survey of American households focusing on their views on what LGBT topics are and should be taught, and what LGBT-themed books should be assigned and available. We report results overall and broken down by demographic, partisan, and geographic variables. We find that Americans report that they largely do not know what topics are being taught in schools, but they do not think LGBT topics are being taught to elementary children. There is widespread opposition to teaching about LGBT topics in elementary school, with more mixed support in high school. Voters are much more opposed to LGBT-themed books being assigned to students than simply made available to them (e.g. in libraries). There are very large splits in …

Katie MacEntee

Katie MacEntee

University of Toronto

Journal of LGBT Youth

Doing it together, but in a queer way: joyful worldmaking with 2SLGBTQI+ folks in Atlantic Canada

This paper explores the joyful worldmaking that circulated between a group of 35 queer and trans adults and youth from across Atlantic Canada—New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and Newfoundland and Labrador—who came together in February 2023 for a do-it-yourself (DIY) archiving and artmaking workshop on unceded and unsurrendered Wolastoqiyik territory in Fredericton, New Brunswick—as part of an ongoing participatory visual research initiative called Pride/Swell+. Exploring this worldmaking through frameworks of queer joy, we ask: How does worldmaking circulate within the Pride/Swell + workshop space and archives? Why is queer and trans worldmaking valuable to 2SLGBTQI + youth? What is the importance in remembering and archiving the things that queer and trans folks are doing to craft their everyday lives? Through DIY artmaking and participatory methodologies, we …

Lefteris Patlamazoglou

Lefteris Patlamazoglou

Monash University

Journal of LGBT Youth

The role of engagement with BL manga on queer young people’s sense of belonging

There is limited qualitative research about the role of engagement with Boys Love (BL) manga on queer or questioning young people. The present study aimed to explore the motivations for consuming Boys Love (BL) manga and the outcomes of engagement with this type of material on queer young people’s sense of belonging. Semi-structured interviews were held with nine queer young people who consumed BL manga to explore their experiences and perspectives regarding BL manga. Two research questions were posed: (1) What are queer young people’s motives for consuming BL manga? and (2) What are the outcomes of engagement with BL manga on queer young people’s sense of belonging? Using thematic analysis, five main themes were identified in the data: a comforting and safe environment, self-acceptance, connection and relatedness, hopes for the future, and queer liberation. The findings …

Robin Lin Miller

Robin Lin Miller

Michigan State University

Journal of LGBT Youth

Breaking the binary: Restriction and reclamation of power among transgender and gender diverse young adults

Binary gender norms in the U.S. contribute to the systemic marginalization of transgender and gender diverse (TGD) individuals. These norms shape beliefs and assumptions about TGD young adults; inform the policies that govern their rights, the settings they occupy, and research conducted about them. Experiences based on binary conceptions of gender may leave TGD young adults feeling disempowered and require they develop resilient strategies to maintain or reclaim power and control over their lives and decisions. The purpose of this study was to explore the mechanisms through which TGD young adults (ages 18 to 24) demonstrate resilience and resist oppressive gender norms. In collaboration with a TGD young adult advisory team, we used a participatory focus group method (Youth GO) to engage TGD participants in critically examining power and powerlessness in the context of their multiple identities …

Steven Feldman

Steven Feldman

West Chester University of Pennsylvania

Journal of LGBT Youth

Examining campus support systems for LGBQ+ college students’ mental health and well-being

In this study, we explore LGBQ+ college students’ experiences related to mental health and wellbeing, using the Proud & Thriving Framework. Our research utilizes a large-scale, multi-institutional, quantitative and qualitative data set that includes a variety of institutional types and geographic locations across the United States. We use a series of OLS regression analyses and descriptive analyses to explore LGBQ+ students’ difficulties, support networks, knowledge about institution-provided supports, and student-suggested ways that their institution has supported their mental health and well-being. We find that large portions of LGBQ+ students do not know how to get help with various difficulties and that students within the LGBQ+ community had differing relationships with risks and supports depending on their specific LGBQ+ identity such as asexual students struggling less with workload-related issues and …

Jennifer A  Currin-McCulloch

Jennifer A Currin-McCulloch

Colorado State University

Journal of LGBT Youth

Queer umbrella: a student-employee collaboration to enhance 2SLGBTQ+ well-being and belonging

Students and employees from Colorado State University School of Social Work partnered to co-lead a comprehensive student and employee community-building initiative focused on enhancing 2SLGBTQ+ student and employee well-being and belonging. The Queer Umbrella, created in response to queer and trans-identifying students and employees’ experiences within a heterosexist and cissexist departmental climate, obtained funding from the university to improve departmental climate and 2SLGBTQ+ student and employee retention by focusing on three priority areas: visibility, action, and resilience. The ambitious semester-long grant initiative incorporated a variety of activities such as resiliency-based mutual aid groups and 2SLGBTQ+ alumnx lectures, advocacy, and queer and trans celebratory events. The purpose of this brief is to 1) share our experiences as leaders of the Queer Umbrella initiative, 2 …

Todd A Coleman

Todd A Coleman

Wilfrid Laurier University

Journal of LGBT Youth

COVID-19 pandemic experiences of LGBTQIA+ Asian youth in Canada

LGBTQIA + Asian youth face unique challenges due to their intersecting identities (i.e. racial discrimination from LGBTQIA + communities, and LGBTQIA+ -related stigmatization from their Asian culture). The COVID-19 pandemic exacerbated existing intersectional challenges due to the closure of community spaces for LGBTQIA + Asian youth, spaces which served as a safe haven from home and anti-Asians sentiments. Thus far, there have been no studies examining how the COVID-19 pandemic was experienced by LGBTQIA + Asian Canadian youth. To address this, we completed eight online focus group discussions with 30 LGBTQIA + Asian youth from across Canada, alongside a brief quantitative questionnaire to explore specific components of participants’ mental health and well-being. Quantitative findings suggested many participants were experiencing negative mental health outcomes (i.e. stress …