Preregistering qualitative research: A Delphi study

International Journal of Qualitative Methods

Published On 2020/12/8

Preregistrations—records made a priori about study designs and analysis plans and placed in open repositories—are thought to strengthen the credibility and transparency of research. Different authors have put forth arguments in favor of introducing this practice in qualitative research and made suggestions for what to include in a qualitative preregistration form. The goal of this study was to gauge and understand what parts of preregistration templates qualitative researchers would find helpful and informative. We used an online Delphi study design consisting of two rounds with feedback reports in between. In total, 48 researchers participated (response rate: 16%). In round 1, panelists considered 14 proposed items relevant to include in the preregistration form, but two items had relevance scores just below our predefined criterion (68%) with mixed argument and were put forth again. We combined items where …

Journal

International Journal of Qualitative Methods

Published On

2020/12/8

Volume

19

Page

1609406920976417

Authors

Kristian Skrede Gleditsch

Kristian Skrede Gleditsch

University of Essex

Position

Professor Department of Government & Peace Research Institute Oslo

H-Index(all)

60

H-Index(since 2020)

48

I-10 Index(all)

0

I-10 Index(since 2020)

0

Citation(all)

0

Citation(since 2020)

0

Cited By

0

Research Interests

Conflict

international relations

democratization

statistical methods

political science

University Profile Page

Fernando Rosenblatt

Fernando Rosenblatt

Universidad Diego Portales

Position

Profesor Asociado Escuela de Ciencia Política

H-Index(all)

17

H-Index(since 2020)

13

I-10 Index(all)

0

I-10 Index(since 2020)

0

Citation(all)

0

Citation(since 2020)

0

Cited By

0

Research Interests

Comparative Politics

University Profile Page

Florian G. Kern

Florian G. Kern

University of Essex

Position

H-Index(all)

9

H-Index(since 2020)

9

I-10 Index(all)

0

I-10 Index(since 2020)

0

Citation(all)

0

Citation(since 2020)

0

Cited By

0

Research Interests

Comparative politics

Political Economy of Development

local governance

mixed methods inference

University Profile Page

Other Articles from authors

Kristian Skrede Gleditsch

Kristian Skrede Gleditsch

University of Essex

Governance

Judiciary institutions and violent crime in American Indian nations

In many American Indian nations the security situation is dire. While scholars have studied how institutions shape economic development in American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) nations, the role of AIAN institutions for security and violent crime has received much less attention—despite the extensive literature highlighting the important role of effective and legitimate institutions in the long‐term decline of violence. We analyze how varying types of American Indian polities and judiciary institutions fare in tackling violent crime using data across 146 American Indian polities. Our findings indicate that more autonomous American Indian criminal justice institutions with specialized court systems are associated with lower violent crime. However, customary justice institutions do not appear to be effective in reducing violent crime, highlighting the problem of cultural mismatch between traditional and formal justice …

Florian G. Kern

Florian G. Kern

University of Essex

Third World Quarterly

Between cooperation and conflict: tracing the variance in relations of traditional governance institutions and the state in Sub-Saharan Africa

The relationship between the state and traditional governance institutions (TGI) in contemporary politics has recently received increased scholarly attention. Traditional leaders play important roles in elections, public goods provision or conflict resolution in Sub-Saharan Africa. We analyse under what conditions cooperation or conflict emerge between the state and TGI. We contribute to the understanding of state-traditional relations by studying how governments interact simultaneously with varying TGI of different ethnic groups. We compare state-TGI relations for eight traditional polities in Kenya, Namibia, Tanzania, and Uganda, based on extensive fieldwork and interviews with state and traditional authorities, experts and constituents. We study three factors shaping state relations with different TGI: (1) the significance of TGI – both social and organisational – in each country and ethnic group; (2) the institutional …

Florian G. Kern

Florian G. Kern

University of Essex

Governance

Judiciary institutions and violent crime in American Indian nations

In many American Indian nations the security situation is dire. While scholars have studied how institutions shape economic development in American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) nations, the role of AIAN institutions for security and violent crime has received much less attention—despite the extensive literature highlighting the important role of effective and legitimate institutions in the long‐term decline of violence. We analyze how varying types of American Indian polities and judiciary institutions fare in tackling violent crime using data across 146 American Indian polities. Our findings indicate that more autonomous American Indian criminal justice institutions with specialized court systems are associated with lower violent crime. However, customary justice institutions do not appear to be effective in reducing violent crime, highlighting the problem of cultural mismatch between traditional and formal justice …

Fernando Rosenblatt

Fernando Rosenblatt

Universidad Diego Portales

Comparative Politics

Unorganized Politics: The Political Aftermath of Social Unrest in Chile

Extant theories posit that political conflict affords favorable circumstances for successful party building. However, crises do not necessarily engender the emergence of new parties with the capacity to integrate discontent. In this in-depth analysis of Chile, we show how lowering barriers to entry inadvertently precluded the development of a national political organization. We describe the nature of new political actors who emerged from the cycle of protest that erupted in October 2019. Our analysis shows that the traits of the umbrellas of lists of independents conditioned the ability of emerging actors to aggregate demands of different districts. The Chilean case illustrates how a cycle of protest can engender new, electorally successful political actors but does not assure these actors’ capacity to legitimate the political process.

Fernando Rosenblatt

Fernando Rosenblatt

Universidad Diego Portales

Government Information Quarterly

How the exercise of the right to information (RTI) affects trust in political institutions

Various countries throughout the world have enacted transparency reforms, especially reforms oriented toward increasing access to government information (right to information, RTI). While researchers have published thorough examinations of the impact of such reforms, no study to date has surveyed how the successful exercise of this RTI affects institutional trust. Using a field experiment in Chile, Peru, and Uruguay to elicit information requests, we identify the effect of the successful exercise of RTI on individuals' trust in and perceptions of the transparency of institutions in these countries. Our findings indicate a need to differentiate between how the successful exercise of RTI affects individuals' trust in a specific institution— and especially their perception of its transparency—and how it affects trust in and perceived transparency of governmental institutions in general.

Fernando Rosenblatt

Fernando Rosenblatt

Universidad Diego Portales

Perspectives on Politics

Raising the red flag: democratic elitism and the protests in Chile

The recent surge of global populism has led many intellectuals to call for new forms of democratic elitism. Yet research into the sources of support for political organizations and regimes predicts that suppressing opportunities for public participation will likely exacerbate antisystem political tendencies. We cite the recent protests in Chile, a nation that has employed democratic elitism more effectively than perhaps any other, as illustrative of the eventual consequences of suppressing voice. Our research indicates that empowering citizens through vibrant parties and continuous democracy is the best way to avoid populist impulses and waves of contentious politics.

Kristian Skrede Gleditsch

Kristian Skrede Gleditsch

University of Essex

European Journal of International Relations

Clouds with silver linings: how mobilization shapes the impact of coups on democratization

There is a long-standing debate over the impact of coups on democratization. Some argue that coups can help promote transitions to democratic rule. Yet, others contend that coups often spur increased repression and autocratization, undermining hopes of democratic reform. We argue that both democratic and autocratic changes are more likely after a coup and that popular mobilization plays a crucial role in shaping the post-coup trajectory. Democratization is more likely when coups occur in the presence of significant popular mobilization. A coup reveals cracks within a regime, and the combination of pressure from within and threat from below during popular mobilizations fosters greater incentives to promise democratic reform. In the absence of popular mobilization, autocratic rule is more likely, especially when a coup is successful. We test our argument on the combined effect of popular mobilization and coups …

Kristian Skrede Gleditsch

Kristian Skrede Gleditsch

University of Essex

PLoS one

Local deprivation predicts right-wing hate crime in England

We argue that community deprivation can increase the risk of right-wing radicalization and violent attacks and that measures of local deprivation can help improve forecasting local hate crime rates. A large body of research stresses how experiences of deprivation can erode the perceived legitimacy of political leaders and institutions, increase alienation, and encourage right-wing radicalization and hate crime. Existing analyses have found limited support for a close relationship between deprivation and radicalization among individuals. We provide an alternative approach using highly disaggregated data for England and show that information on local deprivation can improve predictions of the location of right-wing hate crime attacks. Beyond the ability to predict where right-wing hate crime is likely, our results suggest that efforts to decrease deprivation can have important consequences for political violence, and that targeting structural facilitators to prevent far-right violence ex ante can be an alternative or complement to ex post measures.

Kristian Skrede Gleditsch

Kristian Skrede Gleditsch

University of Essex

Journal of Peace Research

Going, going, gone? Varieties of dissent and leader exit

We examine how popular dissent affects the likelihood that political leaders lose power, distinguishing between types of dissent in terms of nonviolent/violent primary tactics as well as the level of individual participation. We posit that protests threaten leaders both directly through the governance costs of citizen non-compliance, and indirectly through the increased risk of elite defections in the ruling coalition. In a series of propositions we detail how the type of dissent and the magnitude of participation influence the odds of leaders surviving in office. We argue that mass nonviolent challenges tend to be more threatening to a leader’s rule than violent dissent, given the characteristics of movements likely to choose nonviolent tactics. Moreover, the effectiveness of the challenge increases in the scale and size of the dissident campaign, and movements that can mobilize larger numbers have a comparative advantage in …

Kristian Skrede Gleditsch

Kristian Skrede Gleditsch

University of Essex

International Studies Review

Challenges to Scholarship and Policy During Crises

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a dramatic influence on mortality and public health and generated much speculation on potential impacts on international politics. Fast-moving crises such as the COVID pandemic and 2008 financial crises entail many challenges for scholarship; events evolve rapidly, our prior knowledge base is limited, it is unclear whether existing theories or analogies apply, and new research findings emerge quickly but also erratically. Researchers face demands to engage with policy and general audiences when normal standards of scholarship may be difficult to apply. Crises can also have a dramatic impact on how we conduct research and interact with other scholars. The forum introduction outlines how crises pose challenges for scholarship and policy and the value of approaching crises such as COVID-19 in comparative perspective. Milner highlights the important differences …

Kristian Skrede Gleditsch

Kristian Skrede Gleditsch

University of Essex

Peace Economics, Peace Science and Public Policy

This Research has Important Policy Implications…

The COVID 19 pandemic has generated much interest in the relationship between research and policy. It has drawn new attention to the limitations of a linear model, where policy is based on first observing prior scientific research and then designed in response to this. Conflict researchers often motivate the importance of their work by claiming that their “research has important policy implications”, but the proposals offered are often at best incomplete. I identify a number of common limitations in claims about policy implications, including a lack of discussion of objectives and priorities, stating objectives themselves as if they were policies, claims about targeting factors without discussing the effectiveness of possible interventions, and a failure to consider uncertainty and potential tensions with other objectives or unintended effects. Research can potentially inform policy discussions and improve decisions, but the …

Kristian Skrede Gleditsch

Kristian Skrede Gleditsch

University of Essex

Political Research Quarterly

A double-edge sword? Mass media and nonviolent dissent in autocracies

It is often assumed that nondemocratic regimes will control mass media and suppress independent information, but in many autocracies the media are partially free and imperfectly controlled. We argue that partial media freedom can increase the prospects for mass nonviolent dissent. We develop a theory emphasizing how even less than perfectly free media outlets can increase the ability of individuals to coordinate and mobilize, and provide an informational endowment that can help non-state actors overcome collective mobilization barriers. We further argue that this informational endowment amplifies the effect of other influences spurring mass protests in autocracies, in particular protest contagion and elections. We find empirical support for our argument in an analysis of all autocracies between 1955 and 2013. A case study of the Georgian Rose revolution provides further support for the postulated mechanisms.

Kristian Skrede Gleditsch

Kristian Skrede Gleditsch

University of Essex

Political Geography

Michael D. Ward (1948–2021) and the road to space, networks and geography

We were very sad to learn of the passing of our mentor, friend, and collaborator Michael D. Ward on 9 July 2021. Mike made important contributions to political geography, and he served on the editorial board of Political Geography from 2002 to 2013 as well as the advisory board for the Center for Spatially Integrated Social Sciences at the University of California Santa Barbara. Above all, he played a key role in disseminating insights on the role of geography and spatial concepts and methods to his home discipline, political science.In this intervention, we have gathered scholars who worked with Mike at different times in his career to reflect on themes in his research and the enduring relevance of his contributions. Our introduction gives a brief account of how Mike’s interest in geography and space evolved.

Fernando Rosenblatt

Fernando Rosenblatt

Universidad Diego Portales

Political Communication

Local Government, Social Media and Management of COVID-19: The Case of Chilean Mayoral Communication

Most research on governments’ use of social media focuses on the national or federal level. We therefore know little about the way local authorities harness social media platforms to communicate with their constituencies. This paper studies the role structural and political variables played in Chilean mayors’ political communication strategies during 2020–2021, a period of municipal elections marked by lockdowns due to the COVID-19 pandemic. We evaluate whether the volume and characteristics of mayors’ social media posts are related to political factors (partisanship; alignment or not with the governing block; years in office), socioeconomic characteristics (poverty rate; age profile; health infrastructure; etc.); and the incidence of COVID-19 cases and deaths at the municipal level. We found that mayors’ social media communication strategies depend on the functions that different municipalities perform in the …

2023/12/10

Article Details
Fernando Rosenblatt

Fernando Rosenblatt

Universidad Diego Portales

Congreso Uruguayo de Ciencia Política, 6-8 diciembre 2023, Montevideo.

Constituencies inside parties: the decriminalization of abortion in Bolivia and transgender rights law in Uruguay

Current theories employ a transactional approach to explain how a given constituency successfully advances its policy agenda. These theories focus on groups’ capacities to marshal material, mobilizational, or disruptive resources to exert influence on politicians. However, these theories cannot account for how powerless constituencies succeed at promoting their demands. We analyze two least likely cases of the promotion of divisive issues, the decriminalization of abortion in Bolivia and the passage of a law recognizing transgender rights in Uruguay, to explain how powerless groups can advance their agenda. We show how powerless groups can engage in constitutive relations with parties to influence party decision-making processes by acting as constituencies inside parties. In parties with formal and informal structures that allow their members to exercise voice, powerless constituencies can exert agency and transform a party’s policy agenda. We outline this theory through two in-depth case studies using a systematic process-tracing analysis.

Fernando Rosenblatt

Fernando Rosenblatt

Universidad Diego Portales

Perspectives on Politics

Democracy against Parties: The Divergent Fates of Latin America’s New Left Contenders. By Brandon Van Dyck. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2021. 288p. $55.00 cloth.

Democracy against Parties answers the question,“Under what conditions does successful party building occur?”(p. 4). More specifically, it asks,“Why did some of Latin America’s new left contenders survive, while others collapsed?”(p. 22). Van Dyck questions the conventional assumption that democracy breeds parties, writing,“I frontally challenge the argument that democracy facilitates party building”(p. 6). Although he agrees with the premise that “parties are good for democracy,” he asserts that “democracy is not good for parties”(p. 6). Van Dyck provides a comparative in-depth analysis of new contender leftist parties in Latin America to show how mechanisms of survival or collapse occurred.“New left contenders” are leftist parties that emerged after the third wave of democratization in Latin America between 1978 and 2005. Van Dyck defines a “contender” as a party that is electorally successful in its early years; it …

Fernando Rosenblatt

Fernando Rosenblatt

Universidad Diego Portales

Politics & Society

Agents of Representation: the organic connection between society and leftist parties in Bolivia and Uruguay

Parties are central agents of democratic representation. The literature assumes that this function is an automatic consequence of social structure and/or a product of incentives derived from electoral competition. However, representation is contingent upon the organizational structure of parties. The connection between a party and an organized constituency is not limited to electoral strategy; it includes an organic connection through permanent formal or informal linkages that bind party programmatic positions to social groups’ preferences, regardless of the electoral returns. This article analyzes how the Movimiento al Socialismo (Movement toward Socialism, MAS) in Bolivia and the Frente Amplio (Broad Front, FA) in Uruguay developed two different forms of relationship with social organizations that result from the interplay of historical factors traceable to the parties’ formative phases and party organizational …

Fernando Rosenblatt

Fernando Rosenblatt

Universidad Diego Portales

Journal of Information Technology & Politics

Much ado about Facebook? Evidence from 80 congressional campaigns in Chile

How do political candidates combine social media campaign tools with on-the-ground political campaigns to pursue segmented electoral strategies? We argue that online campaigns can reproduce and reinforce segmented electoral appeals. Furthermore, our study suggests that electoral segmentation remains a broader phenomenon that includes social media as but one of many instruments by which to appeal to voters. To test our argument, we analyze the case of the 2017 legislative elections in Chile. We combine an analysis of Facebook and online electoral campaign data from 80 congressional campaigns that competed in three districts with ethnographic sources (i.e., campaigns observed on the ground and in-depth interviews with candidates). The results of this novel study suggest that intensive online campaigning mirrors offline segmentation.

Kristian Skrede Gleditsch

Kristian Skrede Gleditsch

University of Essex

International Studies Quarterly

One without the other? Prediction and policy in international studies

Like many others, I have spent much time since March 2020 reviewing and reflecting on research on COVID-19 and the policy responses to the pandemic. This has in turn inspired me to reflect on research and policy in my own field. The crisis over Russian demands on Ukraine in early 2022 and the subsequent Russian invasion of Ukraine is at the time ofCentre for Advanced Studies, Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters in Oslo, on May 11–12. I would like to dedicate this article to my late supervisor, close collaborator, and personal friend Michael D. Ward. We had many useful discussions on forecasting, and his work on conflict prediction has had a major influence on the field. I hope he would have enjoyed this presidential address.

Kristian Skrede Gleditsch

Kristian Skrede Gleditsch

University of Essex

International Studies Quarterly

Ties that bias in international conflict: A spatial approach to dyadic dependence from alliance ties and inbetweenness

Much of international behavior is linked spatially and temporally. Yet, analyses of interstate interactions generally either assume independence among units or resort to technical solutions to dependence that “throw away” relevant information. We detail a more informative and satisfying approach to modeling spatial dependence from extra-dyadic linkages in alliance ties and geographical proximity as specific pathways of conflict contagion. Beyond deterrence, the purpose of alliances is to draw other parties into dyadic contests, but most existing research on conflict onset generally only considers alliance ties within an individual dyad or external intervention in the same dispute. We develop new measures on third- and fourth-party alliance ties, demonstrating direct and indirect spatial effects of alliances on conflict onset. Similarly, ongoing contests can spread geographically, but dyads in some locations are …

Other articles from International Journal of Qualitative Methods journal

Dr. Bernadine Nsa Ekpenyong, OD, MPH, PhD,FNCO, FAAO

Dr. Bernadine Nsa Ekpenyong, OD, MPH, PhD,FNCO, FAAO

University of Calabar

International Journal of Qualitative Methods

International research collaboration during the pandemic

This paper discusses multidisciplinary international research collaboration team formation during the COVID-19 pandemic, challenges faced, strategies adopted, achievements and dynamics in the implementation of research on Coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19), by the African Translational Research Group (ATReG). The paper also discusses the lessons learnt and future opportunities for global collaborative research. In-depth virtual interviews were conducted with consenting members of ATReG. Questions were designed to provide rich, deep, and insightful opinions, lived experiences and perspectives of ATReG group members on group formation, challenges, strategies and achievements. Interview data was transcribed and analysed thematically, and the results were presented with important quotations presented. The ATReG consisted of English (n = 13) and French (n = 1) speaking sub-Saharan African …

Douglas P. Gross

Douglas P. Gross

University of Alberta

International Journal of Qualitative Methods

“This Is a Look Into My Life”: Enhancing Qualitative Inquiry Into Communication Through Arts-Based Research Methods

As researchers in communication sciences and related disciplines continue to embrace qualitative research methodologies, there will be a corresponding need for innovative methods and strategies for data collection and generation, reflexivity and knowledge translation to make qualitative research methods more inclusive. Historically, those who communicate differently from the status quo have been excluded from or spoken for in qualitative research. The resulting omission of these perspectives in the literature constitutes a critical research-to-practice gap as clinicians seek to deliver client-focused communication care. Arts-Based Research (ABR) offers researchers a means of augmenting potentially linguistically and cognitively demanding verbal interviews while inviting participants to share a window into their daily lives with researchers and knowledge users. Additionally, ABR offers participants alternative …

Silvia Ranfagni

Silvia Ranfagni

Università degli Studi di Firenze

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Demystification and actualisation of data saturation in qualitative research through thematic analysis

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Sarah Wayland

Sarah Wayland

University of New England

International Journal of Qualitative Methods

Different Ways of Being, Doing and Telling in Qualitative Research: Lessons From d/Deafblind Studies

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Nada Signal

Nada Signal

Auckland University of Technology

International Journal of Qualitative Methods

Toward Culturally Responsive Qualitative Research Methods in the Design of Health Technologies: Learnings in Applying an Indigenous Māori-Centred Approach

There is a growing call for health researchers to address the inequities in healthcare experienced by indigenous populations by focusing on the development of culturally responsive research approaches. This article presents a contextual example from Aotearoa New Zealand (NZ) of how indigenous (Māori) knowledge and practices helped reimagine and enhance an existing qualitative descriptive research protocol exploring clinicians’ perspectives of robotic rehabilitation for people with stroke. The intent was to develop a research design that upheld and valued mātauranga Māori (indigenous knowledge systems) alongside Western clinical sciences knowledge. To achieve this, a collaboration of non-indigenous (tauiwi) and indigenous researchers with experience in Qualitative and Kaupapa Māori (indigenous) methodologies, and clinical practice was formed. The researchers undertook a cyclical process of …

Irma Eloff

Irma Eloff

University of Pretoria

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The Utility of I-Poems to Explore Subjective Well-Being in Children and Adolescents with ADHD

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Abraham Matamanda

Abraham Matamanda

University of the Free State

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Doing Fieldwork Among Hard-To-Reach Populations: An Account of Local Female Researchers Studying Foreign Migrants in Downtown Bloemfontein, South Africa

Fieldwork challenges involving hard-to-reach populations and with which many novice researchers grapple are apparent. However, literature on the issues related to female researchers’ experiences with hard-to-reach populations like undocumented foreign migrants is scarce. This article reflects on local female researchers’ fieldwork experiences during a study on the socio-economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on foreign migrants operating informal businesses in the downtown area of Bloemfontein, South Africa. Our findings highlight unique challenges confronted by local female researchers compared to their male counterparts, including the risk of physical and emotional harm. Despite these challenges, female researchers play a vital role in accessing and understanding hard-to-reach populations, contributing immensely to the fieldwork research process. We also recognize the influence of contextual …

Natalina Martiniello

Natalina Martiniello

Université de Montréal

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A Duoethnography on Disability and Allyship Within a Vision Science Doctoral Program: Perspectives on Inclusion, Diversity, Equity, and Accessibility

People with visual impairments (those who are blind or who have low vision) continue to experience an unemployment rate of 70% or higher across all sectors but remain especially under-represented within higher education and the research ecosystem. Among the barriers emphasized by people with visual impairments are those related to accessibility and inclusion. It is within this socio-historical context that we began our interactions as a blind graduate student (Martiniello) and a sighted PhD. supervisor (Wittich) in the process of completing a doctoral program in vision science. Utilizing duoethnography as a methodological approach, we juxtapose two perspectives on a shared experience. Over a period of five years, we explored the ways in which our interactions as a trainee with lived experience and sighted ally have shaped our perspectives on disability inclusion in (and while doing) disability research and …

Stephen Fife

Stephen Fife

Texas Tech University

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Deductive qualitative analysis: Evaluating, expanding, and refining theory

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Sarah Abboud, PhD, RN

Sarah Abboud, PhD, RN

University of Illinois at Chicago

International Journal of Qualitative Methods

Writing Qualitative Research Proposals Using the Pathway Project Mapping Tool

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Andrew McCormick

Andrew McCormick

University of Pittsburgh

International Journal of Qualitative Methods

Using a Transition Design Approach to Explore the Adolescent Shift to Adulthood

Transition to adulthood is a multi-faceted, complex process that affects all areas of an adolescent’s internal and external world. Prior methodologies to assess the medical facet of this transformative time have focused on objective, quantitative analysis of transition practices to facilitate a productive transfer to an adult care provider, without considering the more nuanced context. Transition Design (TD) is an under-utilized, novel methodology that can holistically investigate transition to adulthood by generating insight into the current framework for transition both within and outside of the medical field, and by conceptualizing possible interventions for a more sustainable and equitable future -- all from the perspective of constituent groups who have expertise and a vested interest in transition. Participants within four such constituent groups (young adults, young adult caregivers, healthcare providers, and social services …

Walter Wittich

Walter Wittich

Université de Montréal

International Journal of Qualitative Methods

A Duoethnography on Disability and Allyship Within a Vision Science Doctoral Program: Perspectives on Inclusion, Diversity, Equity, and Accessibility

People with visual impairments (those who are blind or who have low vision) continue to experience an unemployment rate of 70% or higher across all sectors but remain especially under-represented within higher education and the research ecosystem. Among the barriers emphasized by people with visual impairments are those related to accessibility and inclusion. It is within this socio-historical context that we began our interactions as a blind graduate student (Martiniello) and a sighted PhD. supervisor (Wittich) in the process of completing a doctoral program in vision science. Utilizing duoethnography as a methodological approach, we juxtapose two perspectives on a shared experience. Over a period of five years, we explored the ways in which our interactions as a trainee with lived experience and sighted ally have shaped our perspectives on disability inclusion in (and while doing) disability research and …

David Peacock

David Peacock

Queensland University of Technology

International Journal of Qualitative Methods

The Social Organization of Post-Secondary Music Students’ Work and Health: An Institutional Ethnography Protocol

Researchers have found that many post-secondary music students suffer from physical and mental health issues. However, researchers have mainly studied these problems at the individual level, with little investigation of how music students’ work is shaped by the coordinating effects of policies, texts, and discourses at and beyond their local site. This paper describes a protocol for an international project that will explore the health of music students in the context of their daily work. Using an institutional ethnography approach, we will examine the social organization of music students’ work at three universities: two in Canada and one in Australia. This will be the first set of studies that use institutional ethnography specifically for the purpose of understanding how the social organization of music students’ work shapes their health. Data will be collected using several methods common to institutional ethnography …

Nadia Kellam

Nadia Kellam

Arizona State University

International Journal of Qualitative Methods

Narrative Smoothing in the Wild: A Pack Based Approach to Co-Constructing Narratives for Analysis

This methodology paper introduces a collective, team-based approach to constructing narratives in narrative research. The goal of the larger study was to explore the pedagogical belief and practices of engineering faculty members. The newly formed team of researchers ranged from novices to experts in the field of qualitative research, and this space created a unique opportunity to reflect on and explore the co-construction of Cody’s narrative, the first narrative that the team constructed. The narrative was smoothed and constructed in a way that reduces some of the limitations inherent in narrative smoothing, through a deliberate and intentional negotiation process. We hope that this deeper exploration of our methods is helpful for other narrative researchers who are interested in team-based approaches to co-construction of narratives.

Andrew Singleton

Andrew Singleton

Deakin University

International Journal of Qualitative Methods

Research Protocol: A Transdisciplinary Multi-Case Study Research Design Using Mixed Methods to Evaluate the Long-Term Impact of Holocaust Museum Education in Australia

Holocaust museums around the world are distinctive in their emphasis on educational missions premised on the idea of “never again”, a deep belief that increasing public awareness of the history and contemporary significance of the Holocaust – the mass murder of six million European Jews by the Nazi regime during World War Two – can prevent the future recurrence of such events. In the Australian context, tens of thousands of school students visit Holocaust museums every year to participate in learning programs designed to impart powerful historical and moral lessons about the Holocaust, its antecedent conditions, and its ongoing relevance. The aspirations attached to these programs and the scale at which they are delivered stand in stark contrast to the lack of empirical evidence to support their efficacy. This research protocol describes an extensive four-year research study designed to evaluate the …

Natasha Crooks

Natasha Crooks

University of Illinois at Chicago

International Journal of Qualitative Methods

Writing Qualitative Research Proposals Using the Pathway Project Mapping Tool

This article describes using the Qualitative Pathway Project Mapping Tool (QL-PPMT) to guide the development of rigorous qualitative research proposals. The original PPMT was initially developed to assist nursing students in planning their quantitative research proposals and has been widely used by faculty to advise student research projects. In this paper, we have adapted the 26 sections of the PPMT to provide a comprehensive checklist and road map for qualitative proposal planning. Further, we describe each section of the QL-PPMT in detail with examples and suggest additional resources to guide the development of evidence-based qualitative research proposals for new investigators, students, and trainees.

Gerald Jordan

Gerald Jordan

McGill University

International Journal of Qualitative Methods

Applying the Visual-Verbal Video Analysis Framework to Understand How Mental Illness is Represented in the TV Show Euphoria

Mental illness in media can shape viewer’s beliefs about mental health, help-seeking, and empathic behaviors. The current study sought to investigate how mental health and substance use is depicted in popular media targeted for youth. The visual-verbal video analysis (VVVA) framework was applied to the HBO American drama television series Euphoria to understand how mental illness, substance use, and mental health service use is portrayed, and how characters respond to mental health scenes. Euphoria follows a group of high school students as they navigate adolescence, mental illness and substance use. The VVVA provides a framework for social science and medical researchers to qualitatively analyze multimodal information (e.g., text, cinematography, music and sounds, body language and facial expressions) of visual content. This commentary will briefly describe the VVVA framework, provide an …

Satu Venäläinen

Satu Venäläinen

Helsingin yliopisto

International Journal of Qualitative Methods

Lived experience as the basis of collaborative knowing. Inclusivity and resistance to stigma in co-research

Social scientific research has become increasingly aware of power asymmetries and the elitist and exclusive nature of scientific knowledge production. These debates have resulted in more inclusive and participatory research practices. In this article, we focus on co-research, which is a participatory and multi-perspective research strategy that invites the people whom the research concerns to participate as active and influential agents throughout the research process as experts on ‘the studied world.’ Co-research is increasingly being adopted in research involving people who belong to marginalised groups or who face the threat of stigmatisation. Despite its increasing applications, engaging in co-research requires reflection on several methodological and ethical questions that so far have been underexplored in the methodological literature. In this article, we address challenges in practicing inclusion and …

Kerry E. Howell

Kerry E. Howell

Northumbria University

International Journal of Qualitative Methods

Demystification and actualisation of data saturation in qualitative research through thematic analysis

The concept of saturation in qualitative research is a widely debated topic. Saturation refers to the point at which no new data or themes are emerging from the data set, which indicates that the data have been fully explored. It is considered an important concept as it helps to ensure that the findings are robust and that the data are being used to their full potential to achieve the research aim. Saturation, or the point at which further observation of data will not lead to the discovery of more information related to the research questions, is an important aspect of qualitative research. However, there is some mystification and semantic debate surrounding the term saturation, and it is not always clear how many rounds of research are needed to reach saturation or what criteria are used to make that determination during the thematic analysis process. This paper focuses on the actualisation of saturation in the context of …

Victoria Stead

Victoria Stead

Deakin University

International Journal of Qualitative Methods

In pursuit of ethical and inclusive research: What ethics committees and disability researchers can learn from each other

Across disciplines, qualitative researchers have documented epistemological and practical tensions in the ethical review of community-based and participatory research, with many arguing that ethics committees’ decisions perpetuate the exclusion of marginalised communities from research engagement. In the existing literature, the research team and the ethics committee are often characterised as staunch opponents. Conversely, in our recent qualitative research addressing communication about sexuality with young people with cerebral palsy who use communication methods other than speech (augmentative and alternative communication), we found that constructive collaboration between researchers and committee members yielded novel insights. Co-authored by a multi-disciplinary research team and the former chair of a Human Research Ethics Committee, this reflexive case study identified three key …