Modelling columnarity of pyramidal cells in the human cerebral cortex

Australian & New Zealand Journal of Statistics

Published On 2021/3

For modelling the location of pyramidal cells in the human cerebral cortex, we suggest a hierarchical point process in that exhibits anisotropy in the form of cylinders extending along the z‐axis. The model consists first of a generalised shot noise Cox process for the xy‐coordinates, providing cylindrical clusters, and next of a Markov random field model for the z‐coordinates conditioned on the xy‐coordinates, providing either repulsion, aggregation or both within specified areas of interaction. Several cases of these hierarchical point processes are fitted to two pyramidal cell data sets, and of these a final model allowing for both repulsion and attraction between the points seem adequate. We discuss how the final model relates to the so‐called minicolumn hypothesis in neuroscience.

Journal

Australian & New Zealand Journal of Statistics

Published On

2021/3

Volume

63

Issue

1

Page

33-54

Authors

Jesper Møller

Jesper Møller

Aalborg Universitet

Position

Professor in Statistics

H-Index(all)

46

H-Index(since 2020)

23

I-10 Index(all)

0

I-10 Index(since 2020)

0

Citation(all)

0

Citation(since 2020)

0

Cited By

0

Research Interests

Mathematical Statistics

Probability Theory

University Profile Page

Other Articles from authors

Jesper Møller

Jesper Møller

Aalborg Universitet

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Aalborg Universitet

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Jesper Møller

Jesper Møller

Aalborg Universitet

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Jesper Møller

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The asymptotic distribution of the remainder in a certain base- expansion

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2023/12/15

Article Details
Jesper Møller

Jesper Møller

Aalborg Universitet

Proceedings of the London Mathematical Society

Realizability and tameness of fusion systems

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Aalborg Universitet

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Article Details
Jesper Møller

Jesper Møller

Aalborg Universitet

Spatial Statistics

Fitting the grain orientation distribution of a polycrystalline material conditioned on a Laguerre tessellation

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Aalborg Universitet

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Jesper Møller

Jesper Møller

Aalborg Universitet

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Article Details
Jesper Møller

Jesper Møller

Aalborg Universitet

Stat

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Jesper Møller

Jesper Møller

Aalborg Universitet

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Jesper Møller

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Aalborg Universitet

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Aalborg Universitet

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Aalborg Universitet

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Aalborg Universitet

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Jesper Møller

Jesper Møller

Aalborg Universitet

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Jesper Møller

Aalborg Universitet

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Jesper Møller

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Aalborg Universitet

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Jesper Møller

Jesper Møller

Aalborg Universitet

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