Ice‐sheet deglaciation and Loch Lomond Readvance in the eastern Cairngorms: implications of a Lateglacial sediment record from Glen Builg

Journal of Quaternary Science

Published On 2022/11

We present new lithostratigraphic, pollen‐stratigraphic and tephrochronological data obtained from a sediment sequence in a small lake basin in Glen Builg, eastern Cairngorms, with mapping of the surrounding glacial geomorphological features. The collective evidence indicates that basin organic sediment accumulation started during the Windermere Interstadial at ~14.3 ka. The new results reaffirm the conclusions of Clapperton et al. (1975), that any occupation of the eastern Cairngorms by Loch Lomond (‘Younger Dryas’) Stadial glacier ice was spatially restricted. The record also suggests that harsh climatic conditions prevailed throughout the Windermere Interstadial, probably due to the relatively high altitude of the site (~460 m) and its proximity to major Cairngorm peaks. Our new, more comprehensive study provides a robust chronology, and reveals several palaeoenvironmental signals congruent with …

Journal

Journal of Quaternary Science

Published On

2022/11

Volume

37

Issue

8

Page

1332-1347

Authors

John Lowe

John Lowe

Royal Holloway, University of London

Position

H-Index(all)

62

H-Index(since 2020)

26

I-10 Index(all)

0

I-10 Index(since 2020)

0

Citation(all)

0

Citation(since 2020)

0

Cited By

0

Research Interests

Quaternary science

Palaeoclimates

Tephrochronology

Dating methods

Ian Matthews

Ian Matthews

Royal Holloway, University of London

Position

Senior Lecturer in Quaternary Science

H-Index(all)

25

H-Index(since 2020)

20

I-10 Index(all)

0

I-10 Index(since 2020)

0

Citation(all)

0

Citation(since 2020)

0

Cited By

0

Research Interests

Quaternary Science

Ashley Abrook

Ashley Abrook

Royal Holloway, University of London

Position

H-Index(all)

5

H-Index(since 2020)

5

I-10 Index(all)

0

I-10 Index(since 2020)

0

Citation(all)

0

Citation(since 2020)

0

Cited By

0

Research Interests

Palaeoclimatology

Palaeoecology

Other Articles from authors

Ian Matthews

Ian Matthews

Royal Holloway, University of London

Earth System Science Data

Tephra data from varved lakes of the Last Glacial–Interglacial Transition: towards a global inventory and better chronologies on the Varved Sediments Database (VARDA)

The Varved Sediments Database (VARDA) was launched in 2020 and aimed to establish a community database for annually resolved chronological archives with their associated high-resolution proxy records. This resource would support reproducibility through accessible data for the paleoclimate and modelling communities. In this paper, VARDA has been extended by a dataset of European tephra geochemical data and metadata to enable the synchronisation of varve records during the Last Glacial–Interglacial Transition (LGIT; here defined as 25 to 8 ka; Beckett et al., 2022). Geochemical data from 49 known individual tephra layers across 19 lake records have been included, with Lago di Grande Monticchio being the single biggest contributor of geochemical data with 28 tephra layers. The Vedde Ash and Laacher See tephra are the most common layers found in six different records. This highlights the potential of refining the absolute age estimates for these tephra layers using varve chronologies and for synchronising regional paleoclimate archives. This is the first stage in a 5-year plan funded by the Past Global Changes (PAGES) Data Stewardship Scholarship to incorporate a global dataset of tephra geochemical data into varve records. Further stages of this project will focus on different regions and timescales. Data collated for this project are available open access at https://doi. org/10.5880/fidgeo. 2023.015 (Beckett et al., 2022).

John Lowe

John Lowe

Royal Holloway, University of London

BMC medical research methodology

The development and acceptability of an educational and training intervention for recruiters to neonatal trials: the TRAIN project

BackgroundSuboptimal or slow recruitment affects 30–50% of trials. Education and training of trial recruiters has been identified as one strategy for potentially boosting recruitment to randomised controlled trials (hereafter referred to as trials). The Training tRial recruiters, An educational INtervention (TRAIN) project was established to develop and assess the acceptability of an education and training intervention for recruiters to neonatal trials. In this paper, we report the development and acceptability of TRAIN.MethodsTRAIN involved three sequential phases, with each phase contributing information to the subsequent phase(s). These phases were 1) evidence synthesis (systematic review of the effectiveness of training interventions and a content analysis of the format, content, and delivery of identified interventions), 2) intervention development using a Partnership (co-design/co-creation) approach, and 3 …

2023/11/11

Article Details
John Lowe

John Lowe

Royal Holloway, University of London

Land

Testing the effect of relative pollen productivity on the REVEALS model: A validated reconstruction of Europe-Wide Holocene vegetation

Reliable quantitative vegetation reconstructions for Europe during the Holocene are crucial to improving our understanding of landscape dynamics, making it possible to assess the past effects of environmental variables and land-use change on ecosystems and biodiversity, and mitigating their effects in the future. We present here the most spatially extensive and temporally continuous pollen-based reconstructions of plant cover in Europe (at a spatial resolution of 1° × 1°) over the Holocene (last 11.7 ka BP) using the ‘Regional Estimates of VEgetation Abundance from Large Sites’ (REVEALS) model. This study has three main aims. First, to present the most accurate and reliable generation of REVEALS reconstructions across Europe so far. This has been achieved by including a larger number of pollen records compared to former analyses, in particular from the Mediterranean area. Second, to discuss methodological issues in the quantification of past land cover by using alternative datasets of relative pollen productivities (RPPs), one of the key input parameters of REVEALS, to test model sensitivity. Finally, to validate our reconstructions with the global forest change dataset. The results suggest that the RPPs.st1 (31 taxa) dataset is best suited to producing regional vegetation cover estimates for Europe. These reconstructions offer a long-term perspective providing unique possibilities to explore spatial-temporal changes in past land cover and biodiversity.

John Lowe

John Lowe

Royal Holloway, University of London

Acknowledgment to the Reviewers of Quaternary in 2022

High-quality academic publishing is built on rigorous peer review. Quaternary was able to uphold its high standards for published papers due to the outstanding efforts of our reviewers. Thanks to the efforts of our reviewers in 2022, the median time to first decision was 28.5 days and the median time to publication was 94 days. Regardless of whether the articles they examined were ultimately published, the editors would like to express their appreciation and thank the following reviewers for the time and dedication that they have shown Quaternary:

Ian Matthews

Ian Matthews

Royal Holloway, University of London

Cell reports

Skeletal muscle TFEB signaling promotes central nervous system function and reduces neuroinflammation during aging and neurodegenerative disease

Skeletal muscle has recently arisen as a regulator of central nervous system (CNS) function and aging, secreting bioactive molecules known as myokines with metabolism-modifying functions in targeted tissues, including the CNS. Here, we report the generation of a transgenic mouse with enhanced skeletal muscle lysosomal and mitochondrial function via targeted overexpression of transcription factor E-B (TFEB). We discovered that the resulting geroprotective effects in skeletal muscle reduce neuroinflammation and the accumulation of tau-associated pathological hallmarks in a mouse model of tauopathy. Muscle-specific TFEB overexpression significantly ameliorates proteotoxicity, reduces neuroinflammation, and promotes transcriptional remodeling of the aged CNS, preserving cognition and memory in aged mice. Our results implicate the maintenance of skeletal muscle function throughout aging in direct …

2023/11/28

Article Details
Ian Matthews

Ian Matthews

Royal Holloway, University of London

Earth System Science Data Discussions

Tephra data from varved lakes of the last Glacial-Interglacial transition: towards a global inventory and better chronologies

The Varve Database (VARDA) was launched in 2020 and aimed to establish a community database for annually-resolved chronological archives with their associated high-resolution proxy records. This resource would support reproducibility through accessible data for the paleoclimate and modelling communities. In this paper, we used VARDA to assemble an extensive dataset of European tephra geochemical data and metadata to enable the synchronisation of varve records during the Last Glacial Interglacial Transition (here defined as 25 ka BP to 8 ka BP). Geochemical data from 49 known individual tephra layers across 19 varve lake records have been included, with Lago di Grande Monticchio being the single biggest contributor of geochemical data with 28 tephra layers. The Vedde Ash and Laacher See tephra are the most common layers being found in 6 different varve records and highlights the potential of refining the absolute age estimates for these tephra layers using varve chronologies and for synchronising regional paleoclimate archives. This is the first stage in a 5 year plan funded by the Past Global Changes (PAGES) Data Stewardship Scholarship to incorporate a global dataset of tephra geochemical data in varve records. Further stages of this project will focus on different regions and timescales.

Ian Matthews

Ian Matthews

Royal Holloway, University of London

Alzheimer's & Dementia

Exercise‐Associated Signaling Reduces Tau Accumulation and Neuroinflammation in P301S MAPT Transgenic Mice

Background Skeletal muscle has recently arisen as a novel regulators of Central Nervous System (CNS) function and aging, secreting bioactive molecules known as myokines with proteostasis and metabolism‐modifying functions in targeted tissues, including the CNS. Myokine secretion is heavily modified by exercise, suggesting that myokine signaling in the periphery may underlie the well document geroprotective benefits of exercise on the brain. The following studies address muscle proteostasis, a pathway highly activated during exercise, as a potential new regulator of the neurocognitive benefits of exercise. Method We have recently generated a novel transgenic mouse with enhanced muscle proteostasis via moderate overexpression of Transcription Factor E‐B (TFEB), a powerful master regulator of cellular clearance and proteostasis. We have discovered that the resulting enhanced skeletal muscle …

Ian Matthews

Ian Matthews

Royal Holloway, University of London

Major Element and Trace Element Compositions of Tephra Layers Found in European Varved Lake Records

This database contains major and trace element compositions of European tephra and metadata for the datasets and lakes they were found in. It was created by collecting data from scientific literature to support the synchronisation of annually-resolved lake sediment records during the Last Glacial Interglacial Transition (25 ka BP to 8 ka BP). 49 individual tephra layers across 19 varved lake records have been included, with Lago di Grande Monticchio being the largest contributor of geochemical data with 28 layers. The Vedde Ash and Laacher See tephra are the most common layers, being found in 6 different varved records, and highlight the potential of refining the absolute age estimates for these tephra layers using varve chronologies and for synchronising regional paleoclimate archives. This project is the first stage in a 5-years plan funded by the Past Global Changes (PAGES) Data Stewardship Scholarship to …

Ian Matthews

Ian Matthews

Royal Holloway, University of London

International Journal of Exercise Science: Conference Proceedings

IMPACT OF MENTAL STRESS ON THE PHYSIOLOGICAL DETERMINANTS OF EXERCISE PERFORMANCE

E. Flood 1, I. Matthews 1, L. Heenan 1, K. Fisher 1, BJ Winn 2, BS Kirby 2, BW Wilkins 1

Ian Matthews

Ian Matthews

Royal Holloway, University of London

Biodiversity and Conservation

Ecological consequences of historic moorland ‘improvement’

Upland peatlands are nationally and internationally important habitats that can provide a range of ecosystem services, but many are considered degraded by human activities. On Exmoor, (South West England, UK) restoration activities are often aimed at reversing the effects of nineteenth century agricultural ‘improvement’ schemes, the effects of which are not yet fully understood. To develop this understanding, long-term ecological context is essential. We used sub-fossil pollen, plant macrofossils, testate amoebae, insects, coprophilous fungal spores and charcoal to study ecological conditions and disturbance regimes over the last ~ 7700 years at a site in Exmoor National Park (‘Ricksy Ball’). Multivariate analyses were used to explore changes in ecological communities over time and a range of techniques were used to establish the chronology. During the last ~ 7700 years, anthropogenic disturbance regimes …

Ian Matthews

Ian Matthews

Royal Holloway, University of London

International Journal of Exercise Science: Conference Proceedings

THE EFFECT OF CARBON FIBER PLATED MIDSOLES ON THE BIOMECHANICS OF NON-ELITE RUNNERS

S. Reynolds 1, L. Hastert 1, I. Matthews 1, N. Nodland 1, AD Gidley 2, & BW Wilkins 1

Ian Matthews

Ian Matthews

Royal Holloway, University of London

Data associated with'Rowney et al.(2022). Ecological consequences of historic moorland ‘improvement’. Biodiversity and Conservation'

Version 1.1 | 17.02.2016 UNIVERSITY OF PLYMOUTH DEPOSIT LICENCE AGREEMENT FOR RESEARCH PEARL supports the long-term preservat Page 1 Version 1.1 | 17.02.2016 UNIVERSITY OF PLYMOUTH DEPOSIT LICENCE AGREEMENT FOR RESEARCH PEARL supports the long-term preservation of research outputs, and open access to them. To undertake this role, the administrators of PEARL need permission from authors to store, copy and migrate the material in order to ensure that it can be preserved and accessed in the future. This Deposit License Agreement is designed to give PEARL’s administrators the right to do this, and to confirm that the author has the right to submit the material to the repository. The Licence Agreement is non-exclusive, and the depositor does not give away any of their rights to the repository. Depositor’s declaration You (the Author) agree to deposit an electronic copy of …

John Lowe

John Lowe

Royal Holloway, University of London

Response to comment by Dr. R. Cornish concerning the publication by Palmer et al.(2020)

We thank Dr. Cornish for his' comment'piece prompted by our revised model for the timing of ice build-up and retreat during the Loch Lomond ('Younger Dryas') Stadial (LLS) in Glens Roy and Spean (Palmer et al., 2020), iconic valleys that contain suites of landforms that have stimulated debate for over two centuries. Our new interpretations are based on a high-precision varve chronology (the Lochaber Varve Chronology, or LMVC19) anchored to an absolute timescale by the Vedde Ash, a tephra isochron widely-employed in NW Europe which was detected within the varve sequence. These new results led us to challenge the model initially established by Sissons (1978, 1979a) concerning the relative timing of:(i) the expansion of glacier ice into the Spean and Roy catchments, and (ii) the order of the subsequent retreat of the ice margins. In responding to Cornish's comments we are mindful of the complexity of the …

Ian Matthews

Ian Matthews

Royal Holloway, University of London

Response to comment by Dr. R. Cornish concerning the publication by Palmer et al.(2020)

We thank Dr. Cornish for his' comment'piece prompted by our revised model for the timing of ice build-up and retreat during the Loch Lomond ('Younger Dryas') Stadial (LLS) in Glens Roy and Spean (Palmer et al., 2020), iconic valleys that contain suites of landforms that have stimulated debate for over two centuries. Our new interpretations are based on a high-precision varve chronology (the Lochaber Varve Chronology, or LMVC19) anchored to an absolute timescale by the Vedde Ash, a tephra isochron widely-employed in NW Europe which was detected within the varve sequence. These new results led us to challenge the model initially established by Sissons (1978, 1979a) concerning the relative timing of:(i) the expansion of glacier ice into the Spean and Roy catchments, and (ii) the order of the subsequent retreat of the ice margins. In responding to Cornish's comments we are mindful of the complexity of the …

Ian Matthews

Ian Matthews

Royal Holloway, University of London

The Quaternary of the West Grampian Highlands: Field Guide

The Kinghouse 2 record for timing the deglaciation of the Rannoch basin

The Kinghouse 2 record for timing the deglaciation of the Rannoch basin - ePrints - Newcastle University Newcastle University Toggle Main Menu Toggle Search Home Browse Latest Stats Policies About Home Browse Latest Policies About Open Access padlock ePrints Browse by author The Kinghouse 2 record for timing the deglaciation of the Rannoch basin Lookup NU author(s): Dr Roseanna MayfieldORCiD Downloads Full text for this publication is not currently held within this repository. Alternative links are provided below where available. Publication metadata Author(s): Lowe JJ, Matthews IP, Mayfield R, Lincoln P, Palmer AP, Staff R, Timms RGO Editor(s): Palmer, AP; Lowe, JJ; Matthews, IP; Publication type: Book Chapter Publication status: Published Book Title: The Quaternary of the West Grampian Highlands: Field Guide Year: 2021 Pages: 12-27 Print publication date: 15/09/2021 Acceptance date: 15/09/…

Ian Matthews

Ian Matthews

Royal Holloway, University of London

Proceedings of the Geologists' Association

The late quaternary sediment successions of Llangorse Lake, south Wales

The last British-Irish Ice Sheet (BIIS) created a landscape with many sedimentary basins that preserve archives of paleoenvironmental and paleoclimatic change during the Last Glacial-Interglacial Transition (LGIT; ~ 18-8 ka BP). The typical lithostratigraphic succession of these archives is composed of minerogenic/allogenic sediments formed during cold climatic conditions and organic-rich/authigenic sediments during warmer climates. This paper presents a multi-core lithostratigraphy compiled from the extant lake and surrounding basin at Llangorse Lake, south Wales, a basin lying within the southernmost limits of the last BIIS. This lake contains one of the longest continuous terrestrial sediment successions in the UK. Uncertainty previously existed concerning the presence and distribution of sediments at the site related to the Windermere Interstadial (~ 14.7 to ~ 12.9 ka BP) and Loch Lomond Stadial (~ 12.9 to 11 …

Ashley Abrook

Ashley Abrook

Royal Holloway, University of London

Proceedings of the Geologists' Association

The late quaternary sediment successions of Llangorse Lake, south Wales

The last British-Irish Ice Sheet (BIIS) created a landscape with many sedimentary basins that preserve archives of paleoenvironmental and paleoclimatic change during the Last Glacial-Interglacial Transition (LGIT; ~ 18-8 ka BP). The typical lithostratigraphic succession of these archives is composed of minerogenic/allogenic sediments formed during cold climatic conditions and organic-rich/authigenic sediments during warmer climates. This paper presents a multi-core lithostratigraphy compiled from the extant lake and surrounding basin at Llangorse Lake, south Wales, a basin lying within the southernmost limits of the last BIIS. This lake contains one of the longest continuous terrestrial sediment successions in the UK. Uncertainty previously existed concerning the presence and distribution of sediments at the site related to the Windermere Interstadial (~ 14.7 to ~ 12.9 ka BP) and Loch Lomond Stadial (~ 12.9 to 11 …

Other articles from Journal of Quaternary Science journal

Mahboubeh Molavi-Arabshahi

Mahboubeh Molavi-Arabshahi

Iran University of Science and Technology

Journal of Quaternary Science

Postglacial flooding and Holocene climate shifts in the Persian Gulf

Postglacial flooding of the Persian Gulf (PG) was important in shaping human history and driving landscape changes in the region. However, there is a paucity of data regarding the postglacial transgression. The position of the PG at the edge of major synoptic systems of the Indian Ocean Summer Monsoon (IOSM) and Mid‐latitude Westerlies (MLW) makes the environment particularly sensitive to Holocene climate shifts. To investigate the timing of the flooding and to detect the impacts of significant climate shifts on the regional environment during the Holocene, a multiproxy study was conducted on three short sediment cores from two deep sites in the PG. Sedimentological, palynological and geochemical analyses were performed on the cores. The results show that inundation of the western part of the PG that started from ca. 11.5 ka bp continued with successive prominent phases of transgression centered on 10 …

David J A Evans

David J A Evans

Durham University

Journal of Quaternary Science

Late Wolstonian and Ipswichian (MIS 6/5e) sediment fill in a limestone sinkhole, Askham Fell, northern England

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John C. Ridge

John C. Ridge

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Michael James Grant

Michael James Grant

University of Southampton

Journal of Quaternary Science

Coastal Lagoonal Evolution within the Early Holocene Humber Estuary, eastern England

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Frauke Rostek

Aix-Marseille Université

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azhar abdul rahman

azhar abdul rahman

Universiti Utara Malaysia

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Lázaro Guevara

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Luminita Bejenaru

Universitatea Alexandru Ioan Cuza din Iasi

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Isa SCHÖN

Isa SCHÖN

Universiteit Hasselt

Journal of Quaternary Science

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Jorge Sanjurjo Sanchez

Jorge Sanjurjo Sanchez

Universidade da Coruña

Journal of Quaternary Science

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Alessia Masi

Alessia Masi

Sapienza Università di Roma

Journal of Quaternary Science

The recent evolution of the salt marsh ‘Pantano Grande’(NE Sicily, Italy): interplay between natural and human activity over the last 3700 years

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University of Vermont

Journal of Quaternary Science

A critical re‐analysis of constraints on the timing and rate of Laurentide Ice Sheet recession in the northeastern United States

We review geochronological data relating to the timing and rate of Laurentide Ice Sheet recession in the northeastern United States and model ice margin movements in a Bayesian framework using compilations of previously published organic 14C (n = 133) and in situ cosmogenic 10Be (n = 95) ages. We compare the resulting method‐specific chronologies with glacial varve records that serve as independent constraints on the pace of ice recession to: (1) construct a synthesis of deglacial chronology throughout the region; and (2) assess the accuracy of each chronometer for constraining the timing of deglaciation. Near the Last Glacial Maximum terminal moraine zone, 10Be and organic 14C ages disagree by thousands of years and limit determination of the initial recession to a date range of 24–20 ka. We infer that 10Be inherited from pre‐glacial exposure adds 2–6 kyr to many exposure ages near the terminal …

Christoph Mayr

Christoph Mayr

Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg

Journal of Quaternary Science

Seasonal climate variations during Marine Isotope Stages 3 and 2 inferred from high‐resolution oxygen isotope ratios in horse tooth enamel from Lower Austria

We present sequential oxygen isotope records (δ18Ophosphate vs. VSMOW) of horse tooth enamel phosphate of six individuals from two adjacent Palaeolithic sites in Lower Austria. Three molars from the site Krems‐Wachtberg date to 33–31k cal a bp, and three molars from Kammern‐Grubgraben to 24–20k cal a bp. All teeth show seasonal isotope variations, which are used to reconstruct the annual oxygen isotope composition of drinking water (δ18Odw) and palaeotemperatures. Measured δ18Ophosphate values ranged from 8.6 to 13.0‰ and from 10.8 to 13.9‰ at Krems‐Wachtberg and Kammern‐Grubgraben, respectively. An inverse modelling approach was used to reconstruct summer and winter temperatures after a correction for glacial oceanic source water δ18O. Reconstructed annual δ18Odw was −16.4 ± 1.5‰ at Krems‐Wachtberg and −15.3 ± 1.4‰ at Kammern‐Grubgraben, resulting in annual …

Steven Forman

Steven Forman

Baylor University

Journal of Quaternary Science

Where did the water come from? Wetlands and shallow lakes in semi‐arid dunefields from South America during the Pleistocene–Holocene transition

Stabilized and active dunes and sand sheet deposits abound in a small lake‐dotted semi‐arid region of the Western Pampean Dunefield, Argentina. Here, a multi‐scale and multi‐proxy study of three sites, across a hydrologic gradient from lakes to a dryland with groundwater levels at more than 25 m depth, analyzes calcareous and ferruginous rhizoliths, calcareous crusts, hypocoatings, pedogenic carbonate and amorphous Mn‐oxide precipitates within blowout dunes. These palustrine‐related features indicate significantly wetter conditions that allowed the development of shallow lakes and expanding wetlands during the Pleistocene–Holocene transition, limited by associated optically stimulated luminescence ages between ca. 14.7 and 11.6 ka. These wetter conditions, also identified in other nearby proxy records, may be associated with a strengthened South American Monsoon System, potentially during the …

Morten Tange Olsen

Morten Tange Olsen

Københavns Universitet

Journal of Quaternary Science

Earliest Records of Holocene Cetaceans in the Black Sea

The timing of the Holocene transition of the Black Sea from a brackish lake to a marine sea has long been debated. Here, we report on the earliest records of cetaceans in the Black Sea region as a proxy for the connection with the Mediterranean and the transition from a brackish to marine environment. We base our analysis on cetacean skeletal finds and archival data on cetacean skeletal remains from the Bosphorus, the western, northern and eastern Black Sea, and the Kerch Strait. We find that all three contemporary cetacean species in the Black Sea – the harbour porpoise, bottlenose dolphin and common dolphin – had migrated out of the Mediterranean to the Bosphorus and the Black Sea at least 8000–7000 years ago and reached the northern Black Sea by 5500 years ago at the latest. Our study suggests the establishment of a Mediterranean–Black Sea biogeographical connection for marine vertebrates at …

Nie Junsheng

Nie Junsheng

Lanzhou University

Journal of Quaternary Science

Holocene overflow events of the lower Yellow River recorded in Huangdun ancient lake, northern Jiangsu Plain, China

Overflow events are important embodiments of the evolutionary characteristics of the lower Yellow River. Lakes in the lower reaches of the Yellow River have the capacity to record these events. Due to the complex provenance and transport pathways of sediments in local lakes, it is difficult to extract reliable information on sediments delivered by the Yellow River based on conventional methods and proxies. Here, we show results from a genetically meaningful end‐member (EM) decomposition of sediment grain‐size data from Huangdun ancient lake. The grain‐size of the sediments can be decomposed into three end‐members. Comprehensive analysis combining environmental magnetism and geochemical indicators clarifies the significance of each end‐member. EM1 represents mixed signals of various proximal fluvial sediments and the Yellow River materials. EM2 is similar to terrestrial fine‐grained debris in …

Dorothée G. Drucker

Dorothée G. Drucker

Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen

Journal of Quaternary Science

Environmental conditions in the Massif Central during the Upper Palaeolithic using stable isotope tracking (13C, 15N) of bone collagen from large herbivores

The environmental conditions experienced by hunter‐gatherers during the second part of the Upper Palaeolithic (ca. 28 000–15 000 cal bp) are poorly known in the mid‐elevation volcanic mountains of the Massif Central in southern France. The stable isotope ratios of carbon and nitrogen (13C/12C and 15N/14N expressed as δ13C and δ15N values) in bone collagen of large herbivores can track their diet and habitat, reflecting local abiotic conditions (temperature, aridity, altitude). Due to poor preservation of skeletal organic matter in the region, new radiocarbon dating was conducted on a limited number of quality‐controlled collagen samples, based on a minimum carbon content of 30%. They document three main phases of occupation corresponding to the Final Gravettian, the Badegoulian and the Magdalenian, each of which is represented in different regions of the Allier and Loire valleys. Over time, a …

Jacqueline Austermann

Jacqueline Austermann

Columbia University in the City of New York

Journal of Quaternary Science

Refining Holocene sea‐level variations for the Lofoten and Vesterålen archipelagos, northern Norway: implications for prehistoric human–environment interactions

The Lofoten and Vesterålen archipelagos are located off the outer coast of northern Norway far from the center of the former Fennoscandian Ice Sheet and near the continental shelf edge. Existing relative sea‐level (RSL) data indicate a pronounced mid‐Holocene transgression and interesting connections with the region's prehistoric human settlement history. Here we present seven new sea‐level index points from isolation basins and five terrestrial limiting points from a coastal sedimentary sequence to refine the region's RSL history. Ingression and isolation contacts in isolation basin sediment cores are identified using sedimentary geochemical data, scanning X‐ray fluorescence profiles and phytoplankton analysis. The ages of these contacts are determined using radiocarbon‐based age models. Our index points range from 11.2 to 1.5k cal a bp and are combined with previously published data to predict the …