Geodaten und deren Analyse in der Politikwissenschaft

Published On 2020

Räumliche Daten und Phänomene spielen eine wachsende Rolle in der Politikwissenschaft. Durch die Entwicklung von Geografischen Informationssystemen (GIS) und Geodatensätzen werden Wissenschaftlern neue und mächtige Analysewerkzeuge an die Hand gegeben. In diesem Kapitel geben wir eine kurze Einführung in die Verwendung räumlicher Methoden für die politikwissenschaftliche Forschung. Wir beginnen mit grundlegenden Konzepten und diskutieren die Datentypen, die für die Speicherung räumlicher Daten verwendet werden. Anhand einiger Beispiele geben wir einen Einblick in verfügbare Datensätze, die in der Politikwissenschaft Verwendung gefunden haben. Wir beschreiben drei verschiedene Ansätze, wie GIS Werkzeuge und Daten eingesetzt werden können und diskutieren die Schwierigkeiten, die dabei auftreten können.

Published On

2020

Page

419-438

Authors

Kristian Skrede Gleditsch

Kristian Skrede Gleditsch

University of Essex

Position

Professor Department of Government & Peace Research Institute Oslo

H-Index(all)

60

H-Index(since 2020)

48

I-10 Index(all)

0

I-10 Index(since 2020)

0

Citation(all)

0

Citation(since 2020)

0

Cited By

0

Research Interests

Conflict

international relations

democratization

statistical methods

political science

University Profile Page

Nils B. Weidmann

Nils B. Weidmann

Universität Konstanz

Position

H-Index(all)

33

H-Index(since 2020)

29

I-10 Index(all)

0

I-10 Index(since 2020)

0

Citation(all)

0

Citation(since 2020)

0

Cited By

0

Research Interests

Political Violence

Ethnic Conflict

ICT

Protest

Autocracy

University Profile Page

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Nils B. Weidmann

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Kristian Skrede Gleditsch

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Kristian Skrede Gleditsch

Kristian Skrede Gleditsch

University of Essex

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Kristian Skrede Gleditsch

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Kristian Skrede Gleditsch

Kristian Skrede Gleditsch

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Kristian Skrede Gleditsch

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Kristian Skrede Gleditsch

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Kristian Skrede Gleditsch

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Kristian Skrede Gleditsch

Kristian Skrede Gleditsch

University of Essex

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