Electric Micro-Mobilities Scoping Review [Data Set]

Published On 2021/7/15

In 2020, the authors received funding from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada Knowledge Synthesis Grants: Mobility and Public Transit competition. The primary output made possible by this funding is a scoping review of literature on the subject of electric micro-mobilities (EMMs) published between 2010-2021. This Excel document logs all literature found in library databases, Google Scholar, and general Google searches. Each entry contains author(s), year, title, database/location, source type, country/region, city/province/state, and type(s) of EMM.

Published On

2021/7/15

Authors

Meghan Winters

Meghan Winters

Simon Fraser University

Position

Faculty of Health Sciences

H-Index(all)

47

H-Index(since 2020)

41

I-10 Index(all)

0

I-10 Index(since 2020)

0

Citation(all)

0

Citation(since 2020)

0

Cited By

0

Research Interests

Population Health

Active Transportation

Built Environment

GIS

University Profile Page

Kathleen Reed

Kathleen Reed

Vancouver Island University

Position

Assessment & Data Librarian ; PhD Student Simon Fraser University

H-Index(all)

5

H-Index(since 2020)

5

I-10 Index(all)

0

I-10 Index(since 2020)

0

Citation(all)

0

Citation(since 2020)

0

Cited By

0

Research Interests

transgender and non-binary youth

surveillance

privacy

digital humanities

research methods

University Profile Page

Other Articles from authors

Meghan Winters

Meghan Winters

Simon Fraser University

Epidemiology

Risk factors and inequities in transportation injury and mortality in the Canadian Census Health and Environment Cohorts (CanCHECs)

Background:Road traffic injury contributes substantially to morbidity and mortality. Canada stands out among developed countries in not conducting a national household travel survey, leading to a dearth of national transportation mode data and risk calculations that have appropriate denominators. Since traffic injuries are specific to the mode of travel used, these risk calculations should consider travel mode.Methods:Census data on mode of commute is one of the few sources of these data for persons aged 15 and over. This study leveraged a national data linkage cohort, the Canadian Census Health and Environment Cohorts, that connects census sociodemographic and commute mode data with records of deaths and hospitalizations, enabling assessment of road traffic injury associations by indicators of mode of travel (commuter mode). We examined longitudinal (1996–2019) bicyclist, pedestrian, and motor …

Meghan Winters

Meghan Winters

Simon Fraser University

SSM-Population Health

Associations between gentrification, census tract-level socioeconomic status, and cycling infrastructure expansions in Montreal, Canada

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Meghan Winters

Meghan Winters

Simon Fraser University

Cities & Health

Acceptability of built environment interventions to support active travel in 17 Canadian metropolitan areas: findings from the THEPA study

Obesity and related chronic conditions present significant challenges in both national and global public health. Modifying the built environment stands as a population-level strategy to foster healthier behaviours and alleviate the burden of chronic diseases. The success of such interventions, however, hinges on their public acceptability, an aspect often overlooked. This study aimed to evaluate the level of public acceptability concerning diverse built environment interventions promoting healthy eating and physical activity within two major Canadian cities. We conducted an analysis of data gathered from 2,133 participants through a pan-Canadian survey, employing multilevel logistic regression. Interventions were categorized using the Nuffield Council on Bioethics’ ‘intervention ladder’, graded by their level of intrusiveness. Overall, individuals were more agreeable to implementing the least intrusive interventions in …

Meghan Winters

Meghan Winters

Simon Fraser University

International Journal of Sustainable Transportation

Association between network characteristics and bicycle ridership across a large metropolitan region

Numerous studies have explored associations between bicycle network characteristics and bicycle ridership. However, the majority of these studies have been conducted in inner metropolitan regions and as such, there is limited knowledge on how various characteristics of bicycle networks relate to bicycle trips within and across entire metropolitan regions, and how the size and composition of study regions impact on the association between bicycle network characteristics and bicycle ridership. We conducted a retrospective analysis of household travel survey data and bicycle infrastructure in the Greater Melbourne region, Australia. Seven network metrics were calculated (length of the bicycle network, betweenness centrality, degree centrality, network density, network coverage, intersection density and average weighted slope) and Bayesian spatial models were used to explore associations between these …

Meghan Winters

Meghan Winters

Simon Fraser University

BMJ open

Building CapaCITY/É for sustainable transportation: protocol for an implementation science research program in healthy cities

IntroductionImproving sustainable transportation options will help cities tackle growing challenges related to population health, congestion, climate change and inequity. Interventions supporting active transportation face many practical and political hurdles. Implementation science aims to understand how interventions or policies arise, how they can be translated to new contexts or scales and who benefits. Sustainable transportation interventions are complex, and existing implementation science frameworks may not be suitable. To apply and adapt implementation science for healthy cities, we have launched our mixed-methods research programme, CapaCITY/É. We aim to understand how, why and for whom sustainable transportation interventions are successful and when they are not.Methods and analysisAcross nine Canadian municipalities and the State of Victoria (Australia), our research will focus on two …

Meghan Winters

Meghan Winters

Simon Fraser University

The socialities of walking: a post phenomenological study on everyday walking among families.

Introduction. Walking, as a way of being in the world, is a social practice. In particular, the New Urbanism movement argues that walkable neighbourhoods are also more sociable, walking promoting social ties. Such an argument is of importance for public health, as any form of group life-social capital, social cohesion, sense of community-is a determinant of mental health, especially among families in times of sanitary crisis. Yet, evidence, largely based on quantitative research, supporting the relation between walkable neighbourhood and sociability remain inconsistent.Goals and methods. The aim of this research is to explore the socialities–or group life forms–that are interwoven into walking. We adopted a post-phenomenological stance and conducted a walking interview followed by an interview with 26 parents, part of the INTERACT cohort, a pan-Canadian project aimed at understanding the impact of urban …

Meghan Winters

Meghan Winters

Simon Fraser University

Cycling and cognition in middle-aged and older adults: A scoping review

A scoping review that will summarize and identify gaps in the literature examining cycling for transportation and/or recreation and its association with cognition in middle-aged and older adults (45+ years of age)

Meghan Winters

Meghan Winters

Simon Fraser University

American Journal of Epidemiology

Comparing Location Data From Smartphone and Dedicated Global Positioning System Devices: Implications for Epidemiologic Research

In this study, we compared location data from a dedicated Global Positioning System (GPS) device with location data from smartphones. Data from the Interventions, Equity, and Action in Cities Team (INTERACT) Study, a study examining the impact of urban-form changes on health in 4 Canadian cities (Victoria, Vancouver, Saskatoon, and Montreal), were used. A total of 337 participants contributed data collected for about 6 months from the Ethica Data smartphone application (Ethica Data Inc., Toronto, Ontario, Canada) and the SenseDoc dedicated GPS (MobySens Technologies Inc., Montreal, Quebec, Canada) during the period 2017–2019. Participants recorded an average total of 14,781 Ethica locations (standard deviation, 19,353) and 197,167 SenseDoc locations (standard deviation, 111,868). Dynamic time warping and cross-correlation were used to examine the spatial and temporal similarity of GPS …

Meghan Winters

Meghan Winters

Simon Fraser University

Philippine Journal of Science

Facilitators and barriers to the implementation of community-based transportation services for older adults: evidence from six case studies

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Meghan Winters

Meghan Winters

Simon Fraser University

Frontiers in rehabilitation sciences

WalkRollMap. org: Crowdsourcing barriers to mobility

Walking is a simple way to improve health through physical activity. Yet many people experience barriers to walking from a variety of physical, social, and psychological factors that impact their mobility. A challenge for managing and studying pedestrian environments is that barriers often occur at local scales (e.g., sidewalk features), yet such fine scale data on pedestrian facilities and experiences are often lacking or out of date. In response, our team developed WalkRollMap.org an online mapping tool that empowers communities by providing them with tools for crowdsourcing their own open data source. In this manuscript we highlight key functions of the tool, discuss initial approaches to community outreach, and share trends in reporting from the first nine months of operation. As of July 27, 2022, there have been 897 reports, of which 53% served to identify hazards, 34% missing amenities, and 14% incidents. The most frequently reported issues were related to sidewalks (15%), driver behavior (19%), and marked crosswalks (7%). The most common suggested amenities were sidewalks, marked crosswalks, connections (i.e., pathways between streets), and curb cuts. The most common types of incidents all included conflicts with vehicles. Data compiled through WalkRollMap.org offer unique potential for local and timely information on microscale barriers to mobility and are available for use by anyone as data are open and downloadable.

Meghan Winters

Meghan Winters

Simon Fraser University

A systematic scoping review of methods for estimating link-level bicycling volumes

Estimation of bicycling volumes is essential for the strategic implementation of infrastructure and related transport elements and policies. Link-level volume estimation models (models that estimate volumes on individual street segments) allow for understanding variation in bicycling volumes across an entire network at higher spatial resolution than area-level models. Such models assist transport planners to efficiently monitor network usage, to identify opportunities to enhance safety and to evaluate the impact of policy and infrastructure interventions. However, given the sparsity and scarcity of bicycling data as compared to its motorised counterparts, link-level bicycling volume estimation literature is relatively limited. This paper conducts a scoping review of link-level bicycling volume estimation methods by implementing systematic search strategies across relevant databases, thereby identifying appropriate studies …

Meghan Winters

Meghan Winters

Simon Fraser University

Travel Behaviour and Society

How daily activities and built environment affect health? A latent segmentation-based random parameter logit modeling approach

Transport studies have recently started focusing on the link between activity participation and general health. This study explores the relationship between general health and travel activities, physical activity, and built environment attributes. Individuals’ self-rated health is considered a general health indicator. Using data from the Impacts of Bicycle Infrastructure in Mid-sized Cities (IBIMS) survey of Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada, this study develops a latent segmentation-based random parameter logit (LSRPL) model. The motivation for adopting the LSRPL model is to capture multi-dimensional heterogeneity by allocating individuals into discrete latent segments (inter-segment heterogeneity) and then allowing a continuous distribution of the parameters within the segments (intra-segment heterogeneity). The model is estimated for two segments where segment one includes younger suburban dwellers …

Meghan Winters

Meghan Winters

Simon Fraser University

Landscape and Urban Planning

Gentrification, neighborhood socioeconomic factors and urban vegetation inequities: A study of greenspace and tree canopy increases in Montreal, Canada

This study investigates the relationship between increasing urban vegetation and census tract-level green inequities, as well as the role of social indicators in this relationship. We analyzed the augmentation of greenspace and tree canopy in Montreal, Canada, between 2011 and 2017, and its effect on green inequities based on material deprivation, the percentage of visible minorities, and gentrification status using Poisson spatial random effect models. Our analyses showed an increase in greenspace from 57.4% to 65.8% and tree canopy from 21.1% to 22.3% between 2011 and 2017. Census tracts (CTs) with higher levels of material deprivation or a higher percentage of visible minority population had less greenspace and tree canopy at baseline in 2011. Additionally, CTs that were not gentrified had less greenspace and tree canopy than ineligible for gentrification CTs. Furthermore, CTs with more visible …

Meghan Winters

Meghan Winters

Simon Fraser University

Urban, Planning and Transport Research

‘All Ages and Abilities’: exploring the language of municipal cycling policies

As cities work to support greater uptake and equity in cycling, the terminology ‘All Ages and Abilities’ (or AAA) is increasingly common in cycling research and practice vernacular. However, it is unclear the values that underlie this. We undertook a policy scan of Canadian municipal and regional policy documents to understand: the language used to describe ‘All Ages and Abilities’; the infrastructure specified; how municipalities and regions define a cycling network; and how equity and priority populations are incorporated into these plans. Of 35 plans, 25 mentioned ‘All Ages and Abilities’. Fourteen mentioned specific ‘All Ages and Abilities’ infrastructure, with cycle tracks, local street bikeways, and multi-use paths most frequent. Reference to the idea of a network was common (32 plans), with some defining this as a minimum grid. Within plans that used ‘All Ages and Abilities’ language, children and older adults were …

2023/12/31

Article Details
Meghan Winters

Meghan Winters

Simon Fraser University

Emotion, Space and Society

“They didn't have to build that much”: A qualitative study on the emotional response to urban change in the Montreal context

Cities are constantly changing, and the way people experience these changes shapes their future relation with urban space. While studies of urban change often seek to illuminate socio-political and economic impacts, they seldom focus on the emotional responses that people have to those changes. Yet, emotional responses are important as they condition the way we respond to change. To better understand people's experience of urban change and the emotional response associated with it, we led a descriptive qualitative study based on 32 semi-structured interviews and a directed content analysis with people living in Montreal, Canada, and its suburbs. Changes to the urban environment were linked to both positive and negative emotions. Among all the physical and social changes reported, condominiums (“condos”), emerged as a prominent theme that elicited a strong emotional response. Condos triggered …

Meghan Winters

Meghan Winters

Simon Fraser University

SSM-Population Health

Gentrification, perceptions of neighborhood change, and mental health in Montréal, Québec

While census-defined measures of gentrification are often used in research on gentrification and health, surveys can be used to better understand how residents perceive neighborhood change, and the implications for mental health. Whether or not gentrification affects mental health may depend on the extent to which an individual perceives changes in their neighborhood. Using health and map-based survey data, collected from 2020 to 2021, from the Interventions, Research, and Action in Cities Team, we examined links between perceptions of neighborhood change, census-defined neighborhood gentrification at participant residential addresses, and mental health among 505 adults living in Montréal. After adjusting for age, gender, race, education, and duration at current residence, greater perceived affordability and more positive feelings about neighborhood changes were associated with better mental health …

Meghan Winters

Meghan Winters

Simon Fraser University

Habitat International

The temporal sequence between gentrification and cycling infrastructure expansions in Montreal, Canada

Increases in cycling infrastructure might be linked to gentrification. However, there is little empirical evidence investigating the existence and directionality of this possible relationship. This study examined the temporal sequence involved in the relation between gentrification and increases in the cycling infrastructure in Montreal, Canada. We analyzed changes in cycling infrastructure between 2006, 2011, and 2016, considering cyclist-only paths, multi-use paths, and on-street bike lanes. The Ding measure was used to identify gentrified census tracts (CTs) using census data. We implemented logistic regression models with and without geographically weighted regression specification at the CT level to test three scenarios; whether an increase in cycling infrastructure (2006–2011) was associated with subsequent gentrification (2011–2016); whether gentrification (2006–2011) was associated with subsequent …

Meghan Winters

Meghan Winters

Simon Fraser University

Findings

Patterns in Bike Theft and Recovery

Limited research on the patterns of bicycle theft and recovery makes it difficult to tackle the issue of bicycle theft. Our goal is to generate knowledge that can reduce the negative impacts of bicycle theft by better understanding patterns in bicycle theft and recovery. We analyzed data from a North American survey on bicycle theft conditions and recovery circumstances. Results indicate that the reported stolen bicycles were usually locked (59%), and stolen overnight (41%) from enclosed spaces (28%). 15% of stolen bicycles are recovered. Reporting the stolen bicycle on a variety of channels could increase the chance to recover them.

2023/11/28

Article Details
Meghan Winters

Meghan Winters

Simon Fraser University

Prioritizing a research agenda on built environments and physical activity: a twin panel Delphi consensus process with researchers and knowledge users

BackgroundThe growth of urban dwelling populations globally has led to rapid increases of research and policy initiatives addressing associations between the built environment and physical activity (PA). Given this rapid proliferation, it is important to identify priority areas and research questions for moving the field forward. The objective of this study was to identify and compare research priorities on the built environment and PA among researchers and knowledge users (e.g., policy makers, practitioners).MethodsBetween September 2022 and April 2023, a three-round, modified Delphi survey was conducted among two independent panels of international researchers (n = 38) and knowledge users (n = 23) to identify similarities and differences in perceived research priorities on the built environment and PA and generate twin ‘top 10’ lists of the most important research needs.ResultsFrom a broad range of self …

Kathleen Reed

Kathleen Reed

Vancouver Island University

Sociological Perspectives

Moral Panic and Electric Micromobilities: Seeking Space for Mobility Justice

This article makes the case that electric micromobilities (EMMs) are the site of a moral panic and employs the lens of mobility justice to explain it. Through analysis of scholarly and media discourse, interviews with, and social media content produced by, EMM riders (eriders), and the auto ethnographic experiences of the lead author as an electric unicycle rider in daily life, as a participant in online and offline “erider” communities, and as a food delivery worker, we reinforce the conclusion that alternate mobilities face an uphill battle in gaining legitimacy and inclusion in transportation policy and infrastructure. While this is not a new finding—alternate mobilities have a long history of being demonized and excluded—this article offers insight into how individuals who find themselves unwitting scapegoats in conflicts over public space consciously engage in deliberate actions to resist EMM panic and achieve greater …