Abdelbaset A. Elzagallaai

Abdelbaset A.  Elzagallaai

Western University

H-index: 16

North America-Canada

Abdelbaset A. Elzagallaai Information

University

Western University

Position

Research Associate and Lab manager

Citations(all)

1084

Citations(since 2020)

506

Cited By

603

hIndex(all)

16

hIndex(since 2020)

11

i10Index(all)

20

i10Index(since 2020)

13

Email

University Profile Page

Western University

Abdelbaset A. Elzagallaai Skills & Research Interests

Pharmacology

Top articles of Abdelbaset A. Elzagallaai

Hair hormone data from Syrian refugee children: Perspectives from a two-year longitudinal study

For numerous issues of convenience and acceptability, hair hormone data have been increasingly incorporated in the field of war trauma and forced displacement, allowing retrospective examination of several biological metrics thought to covary with refugees’ mental health. As a relatively new research method, however, there remain several complexities and uncertainties surrounding the use of hair hormones, from initial hair sampling to final statistical analysis, many of which are underappreciated in the extant literature, and restrict the potential utility of hair hormones. To promote awareness, we provide a narrative overview of our experiences collecting and analyzing hair hormone data in a large cohort of Syrian refugee children (n = 1594), across two sampling waves spaced 12 months apart. We highlight both the challenges faced, and the promising results obtained thus far, and draw comparisons to other …

Authors

Andrew K May,Demelza Smeeth,Fiona McEwen,Patricia Moghames,Elie Karam,Michael J Rieder,Abdelbaset A Elzagallaai,Stan van Uum,Michael Pluess

Published Date

2024/4/8

Relationships among cortisol, perceived stress, and dental caries experience in adolescents and young adults

Address for correspondence: Dr. Sharat C. Pani Department of Dentistry, BC Children’s Hospital, 4500 Oak St, Vancouver, BC V6H 3N1 E-mail: sharat. pani@ cw. bc. ca

Authors

Naima Abouseta,Noha Gomaa,Ali Tassi,Abdelbaset A Elzagallaai,Michael J Rieder,S Jeffrey Dixon,Sharat C Pani

Journal

Caries Research

Published Date

2024/4/24

War exposure, post-traumatic stress symptoms and hair cortisol concentrations in Syrian refugee children

Altered secretion of cortisol, the primary effector of the hypothalamus–pituitary–adrenal axis, has been proposed as a means by which traumatic experiences compromise later mental health. However, despite the popularity of cortisol as a potential biomarker for stress and adversity, findings are inconsistent, and little is known about the impact of war-related trauma on stress physiology of children and adolescents. Here we aimed to evaluate the relationships between war exposure, current living conditions, hair cortisol concentrations (HCC) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in a large cohort of Syrian refugee children and adolescents (6–18 years) and their caregiver. This longitudinal observational study assessed Syrian refugee children and adolescents in two waves, 1 year apart, within informal tented settlements in Lebanon. The relationships between war exposure, time since leaving Syria …

Authors

Demelza Smeeth,Fiona S McEwen,Cassandra M Popham,Elie G Karam,John Fayyad,Dahlia Saab,Michael J Rieder,Abdelbaset A Elzagallaai,Stan van Uum,Michael Pluess

Journal

Molecular psychiatry

Published Date

2023/2

Advancing Precision Medicine in Paediatrics: Past, present and future

Precision Medicine is an approach to disease treatment and prevention taking into account individual genetic, environmental, therapeutic and lifestyle variability for each person. This holistic approach to therapeutics is intended to enhance drug efficacy and safety not only across healthcare systems but for individual patients. While weight and to some extent gestational age have been considered in determining drug dosing in children, historically other factors including genetic variability have not been factored into therapeutic decision making. As our knowledge of the role of ontogeny and genetics in determining drug efficacy and safety has expanded, these insights have provided new opportunities to apply principles of Precision Medicine to the care of infants, children and youth. These opportunities are most likely to be achieved first in select sub-groups of children. While there are many challenges to the …

Authors

Abdelbaset Elzagallaai,Charlotte Barker,Tamorah Lewis,Ronald Cohn,Michael Rieder

Published Date

2023/1

Novel insights into molecular and cellular aspects of delayed drug hypersensitivity reactions

IntroductionDelayed drug hypersensitivity reactions (DDHRs) represent a major health problem. They are unpredictable and can cause life-long disability or even death. The pathophysiology of DDHRs is complicated, multifactorial, and not well understood mainly due to the lack of validated animal models or in vitro systems. The role of the immune system is well demonstrated but its exact pathophysiology still a matter of debate.Area coveredThis review summarizes the current understanding of DDHRs pathophysiology and abridges the available new evidence supporting each hypothesis. A comprehensive literature search for relevant publications was performed using PubMed, Google Scholar, and Medline databases with no date restrictions and focusing on the most recent 10 years.Expert opinionAlthough multiple milestones have been achieved in our understanding of DDHRs pathophysiology as a result of …

Authors

Abdelbaset A Elzagallaai,Michael J Rieder

Published Date

2023/12/2

Risk and resilience in Syrian refugee children: A multisystem analysis

Refugee children are often exposed to substantial trauma, placing them at increased risk for mental illness. However, this risk can be mitigated by a capacity for resilience, conferred from multiple ecological systems (e.g., family, community), including at an individual biological level. We examined the ability of hair cortisol concentrations and polygenic scores for mental health to predict risk and resilience in a sample of Syrian refugee children (n = 1359). Children were categorized as either at-risk or resilient depending on clinical thresholds for posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, and externalizing behavior problems. Logistic regression was used to examine main and interacting effects while controlling for covariates. Elevated hair cortisol concentrations were significantly associated with reduced resilience (odds ratio (OR)=0.58, 95%CI [0.40, 0.83]) while controlling for levels of war exposure. Polygenic scores …

Authors

Demelza Smeeth,Andrew K May,Elie G Karam,Michael J Rieder,Abdelbaset A Elzagallaai,Stan van Uum,Michael Pluess

Journal

Development and psychopathology

Published Date

2023/12

P24-038-23 The Role and Importance of Three Basic Mechanisms in Being Healthier: Inflammation, Oxidative Stress and Endothelial Dysfunction

Objectives: Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) commonly experience feeding difficulties that negatively impact their nutritional states. Moreover, these children depend on their caregivers due to the late development of their self-care skills. Hence, feeding children with ASD necessitates consideration of nutritional requirements along with the caregiver’s styles in feeding. This study investigated the feeding styles of caregivers of children with ASD and the factors affecting child feeding in Candaba and San Luis, Pampanga, Philippines. Methods: The qualitative research design using the phenomenological approach was employed in this study. A purposive sampling procedure was used to identify the participants. Semistructured questionnaires were utilized to gather the caregivers’ accounts which were then subjected to thematic analysis. Results: Eleven participants from Candaba and San Luis shared their narratives on feeding the children with ASD. From the collected data, three themes were identified namely:(1) Children’s characteristics during feeding,(2) Parenting style, and (3) Caregivers’ experiences and perception on child feeding. Study findings showed that 63.6% of the caregivers practiced the indulgent feeding style because of strict preference, high food selectivity or mealtime behaviors. Both authoritarian and authoritative feeding styles were practiced by 18.2% of the participants. Indulgent feeding of children with ASD stemmed from the prioritization of caregivers on food intake rather than the nutritional content or variation of the meals. Furthermore, results revealed that the children’s characteristics during feeding, mainly …

Authors

Zeynep Demir,Awatif M Abuzgaia,Muhammet Fatih Demir,Erkan Demirkaya,Abdelbaset Elzagallaai,David Piskin,Mahmut Ilker Yilmaz

Journal

Current Developments in Nutrition

Published Date

2023/7/1

Drug Hypersensitivity Reactions in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis: Potential Value of the Lymphocyte Toxicity Assay to Assess Risk

BackgroundCystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disease characterized by multi-system dysfunction resulting in recurrent lung infections and progressive pulmonary disease. CF patients are at a higher risk for drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs) compared to the general population, which has been attributed to the recurrent need for antibiotics and the inflammation associated with CF disease. In vitro toxicity tests such as the lymphocyte toxicity assay (LTA) offer the potential for risk assessment for DHRs. In the current study, we investigated the utility of the LTA test for diagnosis of DHRs in a cohort of CF patients.MethodTwenty CF patients with suspected DHRs to sulfamethoxazole, penicillins, cephalosporins, meropenem, vancomycin, rifampicin, and tobramycin were recruited to this study and tested using the LTA test along with 20 healthy control volunteers. Demographic data of the patients, including age, sex, and …

Authors

Awatif M Abuzgaia,Abdelbaset A Elzagallaai,Tara Mullowney,Michael J Rieder

Journal

Molecular Diagnosis & Therapy

Published Date

2023/5

Genetic markers of drug hypersensitivity in pediatrics: current state and promise

IntroductionDrug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs) represent a great challenge to clinicians due to their unpredictability and severity, notably being potentially fatal. Genetic markers for DHRs have been emerging as potential valuable clinical tools for prediction and diagnosis of DHRs. Dedicated pediatric studies in this field are scarce and many published studies lack key data in this regard.Area coveredThis review briefly covers the current status of the use and validation of genetic markers for drug hypersensitivity in pediatrics. Classification, epidemiology and pathophysiology of DHRs are also briefly described. We searched PubMed, Ovid Medline, Web of Science, Scopus and Google Scholar literature databases for all relevant articles published from their date of commencement to March 2022. We summarized the current existing evidence and discussed the role and potential of pharmacogenomic testing in …

Authors

Abdelbaset A Elzagallaai,Michael J Rieder

Published Date

2022/6/3

Pharmacogenomics in Children

Historically genetics has not been considered when prescribing drugs for children. However, it is clear that genetics are not only an important determinant of disease in children but also of drug response for many important drugs that are core agents used in the therapy of common problems in children. Advances in therapy and in the ethical construct of children’s research have made pharmacogenomic assessment for children much easier to pursue. It is likely that pharmacogenomics will become part of the therapeutic decision-making process for children, notably in areas such as childhood cancer where weighing benefits and risks of therapy is crucial.

Authors

Michael J Rieder,Abdelbaset A Elzagallaai

Published Date

2022/1/1

Pathophysiology of drug hypersensitivity

Drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs) are type B adverse drug reactions (ADRs) traditionally defined as unpredictable, dose independent and not related to the drug pharmacology. DHRs, also called drug allergy if the immune system involvement is confirmed, represent around one‐sixth of all ADRs and can cause major clinical problems due to their vague clinical presentation and irregular time course. Understanding the underlying pathophysiology of DHRs is very important for their diagnosis and management. Multiple layers of evidence exist pointing to the involvement of the immune system in DHRs. Recent data have led to a paradigm shift in our understanding of the exact pathophysiology of these reactions. Numerous hypotheses proposing explanation on how a low molecular weight drug molecule can elicit an immune reaction have been proposed. In addition to the classical “hapten” hypothesis, the …

Authors

Abdelbaset A Elzagallaai,Michael J Rieder

Published Date

2022/12/14

The role of in vitro testing in pharmacovigilance for ß-lactam-induced serum sickness-like reaction: A pilot study

Background: Current pharmacovigilance (PV) methods for detection of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) fail to capture rare immune-mediated drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs) due to their scarcity and the lack of clear diagnostic criteria. Drug-induced serum sickness-like reactions (SSLRs) are rare type of DHRs that occur in susceptible patients 1–3 weeks after exposure to the culprit drug with ß-lactam antibiotics being the most associated drugs. The diagnosis of drug induced SSLR is difficult due to the lack of safe and reliable diagnostic tests for identifying the culprit drug. The lymphocyte toxicity assay (LTA) is an in vitro test used as a diagnostic tool for drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs). Objective: To evaluate the role of the LTA test for diagnosing and capturing SSLR due to ß-lactam antibiotics in a cohort of patients. Methods: Patients were recruited from patients referred to the Drug Hypersensitivity Clinic at Clinic at London Health Science Centre with suspicion of drug allergy. Twenty patients (10 males and 10 females) were selected to be tested to confirm diagnosis. Demographic data was collected form the patents and blood samples were withdrawn from all patients and from 20 healthy controls. The LTA test was performed on all subjects and data is expressed as percentage increase in cell death compared to control (vehicle without the drug). Results: In the result of LTA tests performed on samples from the selected 20 patients. There was a significant (p < 0.05) concentration-dependent increase in cell death in cells isolated from patients as compared to cells from healthy controls when incubated with the drug in the presence of …

Authors

Abdelbaset A Elzagallaai,Awatif M Abuzgaia,Blanca R Del Pozzo-Magaña,Eman Loubani,Michael J Rieder

Journal

Frontiers in Pharmacology

Published Date

2022/8/30

Anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anti-atherosclerotic effects of natural supplements on patients with FMF-related AA amyloidosis: a non-randomized 24-week open-label …

We aimed to evaluate the effect of a combination of natural products on parameters related to inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, and oxidative stress in a cohort of familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) patients with Serum Amyloid A amyloidosis, in a non-randomized, 24-week open-label interventional study. Morinda citrifolia (anti-atherosclerotic-AAL), omega-3 (anti-inflammatory-AIC), and extract with Alaskan blueberry (antioxidant-AOL) were given to patients with FMF-related biopsy-proven AA amyloidosis. Patients were >18 years and had proteinuria (>3500 mg/day) but a normal estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Arterial flow-mediated dilatation (FMD), carotid intima media thickness (CIMT), and serum biomarkers asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), pentraxin (PTX3), malondialdehyde (MDA), Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) were studied at baseline and after 24 weeks of treatment. A total of 67 FMF-related amyloidosis patients (52 male (77.6%); median age 36 years (range 21–66)) were enrolled. At the end of a 24-week treatment period with AAL, AIC, and AOL combination therapy, ADMA, MDA, PTX3, hsCRP, cholesterol, and proteinuria were significantly decreased compared to baseline, while CuZn-SOD, GSH-Px, and FMD levels were significantly increased. Changes in inflammatory markers PTX3, and hsCRP were negatively correlated with FMD change, and positively correlated with decreases in proteinuria, ADMA, MDA, cholesterol, and CIMT. Treatment with AAL, AIC and AOL combination for 24 weeks were significantly …

Authors

Micol Romano,Facundo Garcia-Bournissen,David Piskin,Ulkumen Rodoplu,Lizzy Piskin,Abdelbaset A Elzagallaai,Tunc Tuncer,Siren Sezer,Didar Ucuncuoglu,Tevfik Honca,Dimitri Poddighe,Izzet Yavuz,Peter Stenvinkel,Mahmut Ilker Yilmaz,Erkan Demirkaya

Journal

Life

Published Date

2022/6/15

DRESS induced by amoxicillin-clavulanate in two pediatric patients confirmed by lymphocyte toxicity assay

Background Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) is a rare but serious delayed hypersensitivity reaction that can be caused by antibiotic exposure. The reaction typically develops in 2 to 6 weeks. The pathophysiology is thought to involve toxic drug metabolites acting as a hapten, triggering a systemic response. The diagnosis is made clinically but can be confirmed using assays such as the lymphocyte toxicity assay (LTA), which correlates cell death upon exposure to drug metabolites with susceptibility to hypersensitivity reactions. Case presentations Case 1 involves a previously healthy 11-month-old male with first exposure to amoxicillin-clavulanate, prescribed for seven days to treat a respiratory infection. The patient developed DRESS fourteen days after starting the drug and was successfully treated with corticosteroids …

Authors

Arun Dhir,Hasandeep Kular,Abdelbaset A Elzagallaai,Bruce Carleton,Michael J Rieder,Raymond Mak,Tiffany Wong

Journal

Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology

Published Date

2021/12

Model based evaluation of hypersensitivity adverse drug reactions to antimicrobial agents in children

Drug use in children is–in most cases–supported by extrapolation of data generated from clinical trials in adult populations. This puts children at higher risk of developing adverse drug reactions (ADRs) due to “off-label” use of drugs and dosing issues. Major types of ADRs are drug hypersensitivity reactions, an idiosyncratic type of ADRs that are largely unpredictable and can cause high morbidity and mortality in a hard-to-identify specific population of patients. Lack of a complete understanding of the pathophysiology of DHRs and their unpredictive nature make them problematic in clinical practice and in drug development. In addition, ethical and legal obstacles hinder conducting large clinical trials in children, which in turn make children a “therapeutic orphan” where clear clinical guidelines are lacking, and practice is based largely on the personal experience of the clinician, hence making modeling desirable. This brief review summarizes the current knowledge of model-based evaluation of diagnosis and management of drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs) to antimicrobial drugs in the pediatric population. Ethical and legal aspects of drug research in children and the effect of different stages of child development and other factors on the risk of DHRs are discussed. The role of animal models, in vitro models and oral provocation test in management of DHRs are examined in the context of the current understanding of the pathophysiology of DHRs. Finally, recent changes in drug development legislations have been put forward to encourage drug developers to conduct trials in children clearly indicate the urgent need for evidence to support drug …

Authors

Abdelbaset A Elzagallaai,Michael J Rieder

Published Date

2021/4/30

Pharmacogenomics in pediatric oncology: mitigating adverse drug reactions while preserving efficacy

Cancer is the leading cause of death in American children older than 1 year of age. Major developments in drugs such as thiopurines and optimization in clinical trial protocols for treating cancer in children have led to a remarkable improvement in survival, from approximately 30% in the 1960s to more than 80% today. Short-term and long-term adverse effects of chemotherapy still affect most survivors of childhood cancer. Pharmacogenetics plays a major role in predicting the safety of cancer chemotherapy and, in the future, its effectiveness. Treatment failure in childhood cancer—due to either serious adverse effects that limit therapy or the failure of conventional dosing to induce remission—warrants development of new strategies for treatment. Here, we summarize the current knowledge of the pharmacogenomics of cancer drug treatment in children and of statistically and clinically relevant drug–gene associations …

Authors

Abdelbaset A Elzagallaai,Bruce C Carleton,Michael J Rieder

Published Date

2021/1/6

FRI0547 THE EFFECT OF CORRECTED INFLAMMATION, OXIDATIVE STRESS AND ENDOTHELIAL DYSFUNCTION ON FMD LEVELS IN PATIENTS WITH SELECTED CHRONIC DISEASES: A QUASI-EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

Background While the pathophysiology of chronic disorders varies there are three basic mechanisms - inflammation, oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction – that are common in many chronic diseases. These mechanisms, which have a dynamic structure, are key to homeostasis. However, the failure of these mechanisms to work synchronously can lead to morbidity complicating the course of many chronic diseases.Objectives To evaluate the effect of anti-atherosclerotic liquid (AAL), anti-inflammatory capsules (AIC) and anti-oxidant liquid (AOL) supplementation on the flow-mediated dilatation (FMD), inflammatory, oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction markers in patients with selected chronic diseasesMethods We analyzed data of 178 patients from cohorts with selected chronic diseases (Rheumatoid arthritis, familial Mediterranean fever, DM type-2, Hypertension, Multiple sclerosis, Chronic obstructive …

Authors

M Yilmaz,Micol Romano,Mustafa Kemal Basarali,Abdelbaset Elzagallaai,Murat Karaman,Zeynep Demir,Muhammet Fatih Demir,M Seyrek,F Akcay,Nuri Haksever,David Piskin,Rolando Cimaz,Michael Rieder,Erkan Demirkaya

Published Date

2020/6/1

Pathogenesis of Beta-lactam-induced serum sickness-like reaction: The potential role of reactive drug metabolites

Aims Drug-induced serum sickness-like reactions (SSLRs) are idiosyncratic drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions that occur in susceptible patients 1-3 weeks after exposure to the culprit drug. The pathophysiology of this type of reactions is not well understood and its diagnosis is difficult due to the lack of safe and reliable diagnostic tests for identifying the culprit drug. The lymphocyte toxicity assay (LTA) is an in vitro test used as a diagnostic and investigative tool for drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs). In this pilot study, we investigated the pathogenesis of SSLR using the LTA test to evaluate the potential role of reactive drug metabolites in the pathogenesis of SSLR. Methods Nineteen patients (14 males and 5 females) were recruited to this study. Demographic data was collected form the patents and blood samples were withdrawn from all patients and from 19 healthy controls. The LTA test was performed on all subjects and data is expressed as percentage increase in cell death compared to control (vehicle without the drug). Results There was a significant (p<0.05) concentration-related increase in cell death in cells isolated from patients as compared to cells from healthy controls when incubated with the drug in the presence of phenobarbitone-induced rat liver microsomes (MICs). Conclusion This data suggests the initial bioactivation of the drug to a reactive metabolite followed by a toxic response is a key first step in -lactam antibiotic-induced SSLRs. Further research is needed to explore the implications of this data as to the pathogenesis of -lactam antibiotic induced SSLR.

Authors

Abdelbaset Elzagallaai,Awatif Abuzgaia,Blanca Rosa Del Pozzo Magaña,Eman Loubani,Michael Rieder

Journal

Authorea Preprints

Published Date

2020/4/7

Role of oxidative stress in hypersensitivity reactions to sulfonamides

Antimicrobial sulfonamides are important medications. However, their use is associated with major immune‐mediated drug hypersensitivity reactions with a rate that ranges from 3% to 4% in the general population. The pathophysiology of sulfa‐induced drug hypersensitivity reactions is not well understood, but accumulation of reactive metabolites (sulfamethoxazole [SMX] hydroxylamine [SMX‐HA] and SMX N‐nitrosamine [SMX‐NO]) is thought to be a major factor. These reactive metabolites contribute to the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) known to cause cellular damage and induce cell death through apoptosis and necroptosis. ROS can also serve as “danger signals,” priming immune cells to mount an immunological reaction. We recruited 26 sulfa‐hypersensitive (HS) patients, 19 healthy control subjects, and 6 sulfa‐tolerant patients to this study. Peripheral blood monocytes and platelets were …

Authors

Abdelbaset A Elzagallaai,Elham A Sultan,John R Bend,Awatif M Abuzgaia,Eman Loubani,Michael J Rieder

Journal

The Journal of Clinical Pharmacology

Published Date

2020/3

Cytochrome P450

In this book the editors have brought together the widest group of investigators of the cytochrome P450 superfamily in order to present complete and right up-to-date coverage of this important enzyme system. The authors describe and analyze the components of the enzyme system, the reaction mechanisms involved, and the evolution and nomenclature of this superfamily of enzymes. They also describe the hepatic microsomal enzyme in a large number of species, from mammalian to birds and fish, to plants and unicellular organisms. The different P450 forms in different tissues of the mammalian system are also treated. Regulatory factors of P450 expression receive considerable attention, as do studies on the mechanism of interaction of the microsomal monooxygenase system components. Of particular interest to the reader are, for the first time, a compilation of chapters dedicated to forms of cytochrome P450 involved in steroid hormone biosynthesis. This volume presents the most complete survey of the cytochrome P450 field. It will allow recognition and understanding of the very wide implications this enzyme system has on life processes.

Authors

Emel Arinç,WL Backes,I Benveniste,Roger Bernard,LS Birnbaum,SD Black,J Blanck,E Bresnick,MJ Coon,CJ Corbin,KM Curnow,AK Daly,X Ding,J Doehmer,F Durst,MJ Fasco,R Feyereisen,Y Fujii-Kuriyama,Y Funae,FJ Gonzales,SE Graham-Lorence,RW Gray,H Greim,FP Guengerich,J-A Gustafsson,DK Hammond,BW Hollis,JR Idle,S Imaoka,I Jansson,C Jung,O Käppeli,LS Kaminsky,H Kappus,CB Kasper,R Kato,MW Kilgore,WN Kühn-Velten,W Levin,MS Mahendroo,MA Marletta,GD Means,CR Mendelson,D Müller-Enoch,M Noshiro,RS Obach,T Ogishima,K Okuda,T Omura,PR Ortiz de Montellano,L Pascoe,H Rein,K Ruckpaul,DE Ryan,D Sanglard,JB Schenkman,LR Schwarz,AL Shen,ER Simpson,JF Sinclair,PR Sinclair,K Sogawa,JJ Stegeman,DJ Stralka,HW Strobel,G Strobl,LE Vickery,M Warner,DJ Waxman,KA White,PC White,T White,FJ Wiebel,K Wikvall,T Wolff,Y Yamazoe,Y Yoshida,P Zimniak

Published Date

2013/3/8

The effect of corrected inflammation, oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction on fmd levels in patients with selected chronic diseases: a quasi-experimental study

While the pathophysiology of chronic disorders varies there are three basic mechanisms - inflammation, oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction – that are common in many chronic diseases. However, the failure of these mechanisms to work synchronously can lead to morbidity complicating the course of many chronic diseases. We analyzed data of 178 patients from cohorts with selected chronic diseases in this quasi-experimental study. Endothelial dysfunction was determined by flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) levels. Serum ADMA, high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), serum PTX3, malondialdehyde (MDA), Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) levels and FMD were studied in baseline and after 12 weeks of Morinda citrifolia (anti-atherosclerotic liquid- AAL), omega-3 (anti-inflammatory capsules- AIC) and extract with …

Authors

Mahmut Ilker Yilmaz,Micol Romano,Mustafa Kemal Basarali,Abdelbaset Elzagallaai,Murat Karaman,Zeynep Demir,Muhammet Fatih Demir,Fatih Akcay,Melik Seyrek,Nuri Haksever,David Piskin,Rolando Cimaz,Michael J Rieder,Erkan Demirkaya

Journal

Scientific reports

Published Date

2020/6/2

Abdelbaset A. Elzagallaai FAQs

What is Abdelbaset A. Elzagallaai's h-index at Western University?

The h-index of Abdelbaset A. Elzagallaai has been 11 since 2020 and 16 in total.

What are Abdelbaset A. Elzagallaai's top articles?

The articles with the titles of

Hair hormone data from Syrian refugee children: Perspectives from a two-year longitudinal study

Relationships among cortisol, perceived stress, and dental caries experience in adolescents and young adults

War exposure, post-traumatic stress symptoms and hair cortisol concentrations in Syrian refugee children

Advancing Precision Medicine in Paediatrics: Past, present and future

Novel insights into molecular and cellular aspects of delayed drug hypersensitivity reactions

Risk and resilience in Syrian refugee children: A multisystem analysis

P24-038-23 The Role and Importance of Three Basic Mechanisms in Being Healthier: Inflammation, Oxidative Stress and Endothelial Dysfunction

Drug Hypersensitivity Reactions in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis: Potential Value of the Lymphocyte Toxicity Assay to Assess Risk

...

are the top articles of Abdelbaset A. Elzagallaai at Western University.

What are Abdelbaset A. Elzagallaai's research interests?

The research interests of Abdelbaset A. Elzagallaai are: Pharmacology

What is Abdelbaset A. Elzagallaai's total number of citations?

Abdelbaset A. Elzagallaai has 1,084 citations in total.

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