Aaryn Mustoe

Aaryn Mustoe

University of Nebraska at Omaha

H-index: 16

North America-United States

About Aaryn Mustoe

Aaryn Mustoe, With an exceptional h-index of 16 and a recent h-index of 14 (since 2020), a distinguished researcher at University of Nebraska at Omaha, specializes in the field of behavioral neuroendocrinology, marmosets, social behavior.

His recent articles reflect a diverse array of research interests and contributions to the field:

Developing the Common Marmoset as a Translational Geroscience Model to Study the Microbiome and Healthy Aging

Developing Captive Marmosets as a Translational Geroscience Model to Study the Microbiome and Healthy Aging

The Impact of Social Isolation on Cognitive Performance in Marmoset Monkeys

A tale of two hierarchies: Hormonal and behavioral factors underlying sex differences in social dominance in cooperative breeding callitrichids

Captive Common Marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) Are Colonized throughout Their Lives by a Community of Bifidobacterium Species with Species-Specific Genomic …

Fecal short-chain fatty acid concentrations increase in newly paired male marmosets (Callithrix jacchus)

Sex bias in gut microbiome transmission in newly paired marmosets (Callithrix jacchus)

Aaryn Mustoe Information

University

University of Nebraska at Omaha

Position

___

Citations(all)

670

Citations(since 2020)

388

Cited By

453

hIndex(all)

16

hIndex(since 2020)

14

i10Index(all)

20

i10Index(since 2020)

16

Email

University Profile Page

University of Nebraska at Omaha

Aaryn Mustoe Skills & Research Interests

behavioral neuroendocrinology

marmosets

social behavior

Top articles of Aaryn Mustoe

Developing the Common Marmoset as a Translational Geroscience Model to Study the Microbiome and Healthy Aging

Authors

Dennis M Minton,Angela J Marolf,Kelly S Santangelo,Adam B Salmon,Adam R Konopka

Journal

Innovation in Aging

Published Date

2019/11

Age is a primary risk factor for osteoarthritis (OA). The mechanisms that contribute to OA are poorly understood and disease modifying treatments have not been identified. A critical shortcoming in developing therapies is the limited number of translational models available to identify the causes of naturally occurring OA. Our goal is to use the common marmoset as a non-human primate (NHP) model of age-related OA. NHP are the closest evolutionary relative to humans and share many characteristics of human aging. The marmoset has advantages over other NHP for aging research because of their relatively short maximal lifespan and small size. Micro-computed tomography (uCT) was performed on whole-knee joints obtained from young (10 yrs, n= 3) marmosets at necropsy. OA was evaluated using a clinical uCT scoring system and quantitative assessments of subchondral bone structure and ossified meniscal …

Developing Captive Marmosets as a Translational Geroscience Model to Study the Microbiome and Healthy Aging

Authors

Kelly R Reveles,Alexana J Hickmott,Kelsey A Strey,Aaryn C Mustoe,Juan Pablo Arroyo,Michael L Power,Benjamin J Ridenhour,Katherine R Amato,Corinna N Ross

Published Date

2024/3/8

Emerging data support associations between depletion of the healthy gut microbiome and aging-related physiological decline and disease. In humans, fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has been used successfully to restore gut microbiome structure and function to treat C. difficile infections, but application to healthy aging has been scarcely investigated. The marmoset is an excellent model for evaluating microbiome-mediated changes with age and interventional treatments due to their relatively shorter lifespan and many social, behavioral, and physiological functions that mimic human aging. This review 1) provides an overview of the rationale for FMT to support healthy aging using the marmoset as a translational geroscience model, 2) summarizes prior use of FMT in marmosets, 3) outlines a protocol for studying FMT in aging marmosets, and 4) describes knowledge gaps and future research needs in this field.

The Impact of Social Isolation on Cognitive Performance in Marmoset Monkeys

Authors

Missy Briardy,Aaryn Mustoe

Published Date

2023

Disruption of social relationships is among the biggest factors contributing to poor health and well-being. One of the major neuroregulatory pathways associated with physiological and behavioral responses to stressors is the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. In response to a stressor, the hypothalamus secretes corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH), which mediates the release of adrenocorticotropic hormone into the bloodstream. This leads to the release of glucocorticoids (eg, cortisol), which is a key component in the" physiological stress response". One specific area of health outcomes that has received less attention is the association between stress and age-related changes in cognitive function. Marmosets are a well-suited model to address this question because individuals form strong social pair bonds, exhibit complex cognition, and as a result exhibit similar impaired physiological and behavioral functioning as humans do in response to induced periods of social isolation. The goal is to address the link between social stress and cognition in three keyways. 1) Investigate how marmosets perform on a standard cognitive learning task in response to a social isolation stressor in marmosets. 2) Examine the role of the HPA axis in mediating this effect by blocking the CRH hormone that is released in response to stressors. 3) examine whether these effects are consistent or divergent across different age groups of marmosets including middle and old-aged marmosets. The overarching goal of this project is to investigate the extent to which chronic social isolation effects the learning ability of adult and old-aged common marmoset …

A tale of two hierarchies: Hormonal and behavioral factors underlying sex differences in social dominance in cooperative breeding callitrichids

Authors

Aaryn Mustoe

Published Date

2023/1/1

Callitrichid primates are recognized for high levels of sociality in small groups, their great behavioral flexibility, and single-female dominant hierarchies. Previous work has highlighted that dominant, breeding callitrichids engage in behavioral and hormonal reproductive suppression of related and unrelated subordinates by both producing more offspring, having higher levels of ovulatory hormones, and accessing more sociosexual opportunities. This suppression constitutes a nexus of changes in pituitary responsiveness, ovarian cyclicity, sexual behavior, affiliation, and aggression. In this review, I will highlight important features that characterize callitrichid social hierarchies across broad social contexts. Dominant females sometimes exert reproductive suppression on subordinate nonbreeding females, but this suppression varies across callitrichids based on social stability and changes in group composition …

Captive Common Marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) Are Colonized throughout Their Lives by a Community of Bifidobacterium Species with Species-Specific Genomic …

Authors

Lifeng Zhu,Qinnan Yang,Mallory J Suhr Van Haute,Car Reen Kok,Joao Carlos Gomes-Neto,Natasha Pavlovikj,Resmi Pillai,Rohita Sinha,Haley Hassenstab,Aaryn Mustoe,Etsuko N Moriyama,Robert Hutkins,Jeffrey French,Andrew K Benson

Journal

MBio

Published Date

2021/8/31

The common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) is an omnivorous New World primate whose diet in the wild includes large amounts of fruit, seeds, flowers, and a variety of lizards and invertebrates. Marmosets also feed heavily on tree gums and exudates, and they have evolved unique morphological and anatomical characteristics to facilitate gum feeding (gummivory). In this study, we characterized the fecal microbiomes of adult and infant animals from a captive population of common marmosets at the Callitrichid Research Center at the University of Nebraska at Omaha under their normal dietary and environmental conditions. The microbiomes of adult animals were dominated by species of Bifidobacterium, Bacteroides, Prevotella, Phascolarctobacterium, Megamonas, and Megasphaera. Culturing and genomic analysis of the Bifidobacterium populations from adult animals identified four known marmoset-associated …

Fecal short-chain fatty acid concentrations increase in newly paired male marmosets (Callithrix jacchus)

Authors

Lifeng Zhu,Mallory J Suhr Van Haute,Haley R Hassenstab,Caroline Smith,Devin J Rose,Aaryn C Mustoe,Andrew K Benson,Jeffrey A French

Journal

Msphere

Published Date

2020/10/28

The role by which the gut microbiome influences host health (e.g., energy equilibrium and immune system) may be partly mediated by short-chain fatty acids, which are bacterial fermentation products from the dietary fibers. However, little is known about longitudinal changes in gut microbiome metabolites during cohabitation alongside social contact. In common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus), the gut microbiome community is influenced by social contact, as newly paired males and females develop convergent microbial profiles. Here, we monitored the dynamics of short-chain fatty acid concentrations in common marmoset feces from the prepairing (PRE) to postpairing (POST) stages. In males, we observed that the concentrations of acetate, propionate, isobutyrate, and isovalerate significantly increased in the POST stage compared to the PRE stage. However, no significant changes were found in females. We …

Sex bias in gut microbiome transmission in newly paired marmosets (Callithrix jacchus)

Authors

Lifeng Zhu,Jonathan B Clayton,Mallory J Suhr Van Haute,Qinnan Yang,Haley R Hassenstab,Aaryn C Mustoe,Dan Knights,Andrew K Benson,Jeffrey A French

Journal

Msystems

Published Date

2020/4/28

Social behavior can alter the microbiome composition via transmission among social partners, but there have been few controlled experimental studies of gut microbiome transmission among social partners in primates. We collected longitudinal fecal samples from eight unrelated male-female pairs of marmoset monkeys prior to pairing and for 8 weeks following pairing. We then sequenced 16S rRNA to characterize the changes in the gut microbiome that resulted from the pairing. Marmoset pairs had a higher similarity in gut microbiome communities after pairing than before pairing. We discovered sex differences in the degrees of change in gut microbiome communities following pairing. Specifically, the gut microbiome communities in males exhibited greater dissimilarity from the prepairing stage (baseline) than the gut microbiome communities in females. Conversely, females showed a gradual stabilization in the …

See List of Professors in Aaryn Mustoe University(University of Nebraska at Omaha)

Aaryn Mustoe FAQs

What is Aaryn Mustoe's h-index at University of Nebraska at Omaha?

The h-index of Aaryn Mustoe has been 14 since 2020 and 16 in total.

What are Aaryn Mustoe's top articles?

The articles with the titles of

Developing the Common Marmoset as a Translational Geroscience Model to Study the Microbiome and Healthy Aging

Developing Captive Marmosets as a Translational Geroscience Model to Study the Microbiome and Healthy Aging

The Impact of Social Isolation on Cognitive Performance in Marmoset Monkeys

A tale of two hierarchies: Hormonal and behavioral factors underlying sex differences in social dominance in cooperative breeding callitrichids

Captive Common Marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) Are Colonized throughout Their Lives by a Community of Bifidobacterium Species with Species-Specific Genomic …

Fecal short-chain fatty acid concentrations increase in newly paired male marmosets (Callithrix jacchus)

Sex bias in gut microbiome transmission in newly paired marmosets (Callithrix jacchus)

are the top articles of Aaryn Mustoe at University of Nebraska at Omaha.

What are Aaryn Mustoe's research interests?

The research interests of Aaryn Mustoe are: behavioral neuroendocrinology, marmosets, social behavior

What is Aaryn Mustoe's total number of citations?

Aaryn Mustoe has 670 citations in total.

What are the co-authors of Aaryn Mustoe?

The co-authors of Aaryn Mustoe are Guoqing lu, Jonathan Bruce Santo, Adam S. Smith, Andrew Birnie, Emily B Harrison, Brett M. Frye.

    Co-Authors

    H-index: 32
    Guoqing lu

    Guoqing lu

    University of Nebraska at Omaha

    H-index: 24
    Jonathan Bruce Santo

    Jonathan Bruce Santo

    University of Nebraska at Omaha

    H-index: 18
    Adam S. Smith

    Adam S. Smith

    University of Kansas

    H-index: 16
    Andrew Birnie

    Andrew Birnie

    University of Nebraska at Omaha

    H-index: 13
    Emily B Harrison

    Emily B Harrison

    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

    H-index: 7
    Brett M. Frye

    Brett M. Frye

    Wake Forest University

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