Aaron Wienkers

Aaron Wienkers

University of Cambridge

H-index: 5

Europe-United Kingdom

About Aaron Wienkers

Aaron Wienkers, With an exceptional h-index of 5 and a recent h-index of 5 (since 2020), a distinguished researcher at University of Cambridge, specializes in the field of Fluid Dynamics, Instabilities, Computation, Geophysics, Astrophysics.

His recent articles reflect a diverse array of research interests and contributions to the field:

Rapid vertical exchange at fronts in the Northern Gulf of Mexico

On the evolution & equilibration of submesoscale fronts

The influence of front strength on the development and equilibration of symmetric instability. Part 2. Nonlinear evolution

Vertical transport and mixing driven by symmetric instability in strong ocean fronts

The influence of symmetric and inertial instabilities on the evolution of oceanic fronts

Aaron Wienkers Information

University

University of Cambridge

Position

Graduate Student — Trinity College

Citations(all)

259

Citations(since 2020)

196

Cited By

143

hIndex(all)

5

hIndex(since 2020)

5

i10Index(all)

4

i10Index(since 2020)

4

Email

University Profile Page

University of Cambridge

Aaron Wienkers Skills & Research Interests

Fluid Dynamics

Instabilities

Computation

Geophysics

Astrophysics

Top articles of Aaron Wienkers

Rapid vertical exchange at fronts in the Northern Gulf of Mexico

Authors

Lixin Qu,Leif N Thomas,Aaron F Wienkers,Robert D Hetland,Daijiro Kobashi,John R Taylor,Fucent Hsuan Wei Hsu,Jennifer A MacKinnon,R Kipp Shearman,Jonathan D Nash

Journal

Nature Communications

Published Date

2022/9/26

Over the Texas-Louisiana Shelf in the Northern Gulf of Mexico, the eutrophic, fresh Mississippi/Atchafalaya river plume isolates saltier waters below, supporting the formation of bottom hypoxia in summer. The plume also generates strong density fronts, features of the circulation that are known pathways for the exchange of water between the ocean surface and the deep. Using high-resolution ocean observations and numerical simulations, we demonstrate how the summer land-sea breeze generates rapid vertical exchange at the plume fronts. We show that the interaction between the land-sea breeze and the fronts leads to convergence/divergence in the surface mixed layer, which further facilitates a slantwise circulation that subducts surface water along isopycnals into the interior and upwells bottom waters to the surface. This process causes significant vertical displacements of water parcels and creates a …

On the evolution & equilibration of submesoscale fronts

Authors

Aaron Wienkers

Published Date

2022

Submesoscale fronts with large horizontal density gradients and O (1) Rossby numbers are common in the upper ocean. These fronts are associated with large vertical transport and are hotspots for biological activity. Submesoscale fronts are susceptible to symmetric instability—a form of convective–inertial instability which occurs when the potential vorticity is of opposite sign to the Coriolis parameter. Symmetric instability is characterised by growing slantwise convection cells nearly aligned with isopycnals and which encourage vertical transport of important biogeochemical tracers in addition to geostrophic momentum. This momentum transport destabilises the balanced thermal wind and can prompt geostrophic adjustment and re-stratification which often leaves remnant inertial oscillations. This thesis sets out to model the impacts of symmetric instability on the structure, evolution, and equilibration of the broad range of submesoscale fronts.

The influence of front strength on the development and equilibration of symmetric instability. Part 2. Nonlinear evolution

Authors

AF Wienkers,LN Thomas,JR Taylor

Journal

Journal of Fluid Mechanics

Published Date

2021/11

In Part 1 (Wienkers, Thomas & Taylor, J. Fluid Mech., vol. 926, 2021, A6), we described the theory for linear growth and weakly nonlinear saturation of symmetric instability (SI) in the Eady model representing a broad frontal zone. There, we found that both the fraction of the balanced thermal wind mixed down by SI and the primary source of energy are strongly dependent on the front strength, defined as the ratio of the horizontal buoyancy gradient to the square of the Coriolis frequency. Strong fronts with steep isopycnals develop a flavour of SI we call ‘slantwise inertial instability’ by extracting kinetic energy from the background flow and rapidly mixing down the thermal wind profile. In contrast, weak fronts extract more potential energy from the background density profile, which results in ‘slantwise convection.’ Here, we extend the theory from Part 1 using nonlinear numerical simulations to focus on the adjustment of …

Vertical transport and mixing driven by symmetric instability in strong ocean fronts

Authors

Aaron F Wienkers,John R Taylor

Journal

Journal of Fluid Mechanics

Published Date

2021

Fronts with large horizontal density gradients and O (1) Rossby numbers are common in the upper ocean. Such fronts develop through a variety of mechanisms including by mesoscale eddy strains, coastal upwelling, or the input of freshwater via river discharge. These fronts may be unstable to symmetric instability—a form of convective-inertial instability which occurs when the potential vorticity is of opposite sign to the Coriolis param-eter. Symmetric instability is characterised by growing slantwise convection cells aligned with isopycnals and which encourage vertical transport of important biogeochemical tracers in addition to geostrophic momentum. We previously found that this momentum transport destabilises the balanced thermal wind and can prompt geostrophic adjustment which often leaves remnant inertial oscillations (Wienkers et al., 2021a, b).

The influence of symmetric and inertial instabilities on the evolution of oceanic fronts

Authors

Aaron Wienkers,John Taylor

Journal

APS Division of Fluid Dynamics Meeting Abstracts

Published Date

2020

Isolated fronts with large lateral density gradients in geostrophic and hydrostatic balance are common in the upper ocean. Such strong fronts may be the result of baroclinic frontogenesis or of sharp freshwater interfaces as are found in the northern Gulf of Mexico near the Mississippi-Atchafalaya river plume. These fronts may be unstable to symmetric or inertial instabilities which further enhance small-scale mixing and encourage vertical transport between the surface and the abyss. Here, we consider the problem of an initially balanced front of finite width and which is bounded by flat no-stress horizontal surfaces. We examine how the evolution and equilibration depends on the front strength and aspect ratio using nonlinear numerical simulations, and develop a model to predict the profile and effective width of the final equilibrated state in the absence of external forcing. While fronts with Ro> 2. 6 collapse to a self …

See List of Professors in Aaron Wienkers University(University of Cambridge)

Aaron Wienkers FAQs

What is Aaron Wienkers's h-index at University of Cambridge?

The h-index of Aaron Wienkers has been 5 since 2020 and 5 in total.

What are Aaron Wienkers's top articles?

The articles with the titles of

Rapid vertical exchange at fronts in the Northern Gulf of Mexico

On the evolution & equilibration of submesoscale fronts

The influence of front strength on the development and equilibration of symmetric instability. Part 2. Nonlinear evolution

Vertical transport and mixing driven by symmetric instability in strong ocean fronts

The influence of symmetric and inertial instabilities on the evolution of oceanic fronts

are the top articles of Aaron Wienkers at University of Cambridge.

What are Aaron Wienkers's research interests?

The research interests of Aaron Wienkers are: Fluid Dynamics, Instabilities, Computation, Geophysics, Astrophysics

What is Aaron Wienkers's total number of citations?

Aaron Wienkers has 259 citations in total.

What are the co-authors of Aaron Wienkers?

The co-authors of Aaron Wienkers are Liwei Lin, Ryan D. Sochol, Kevin Korner, Ben Hightower.

    Co-Authors

    H-index: 88
    Liwei Lin

    Liwei Lin

    University of California, Berkeley

    H-index: 19
    Ryan D. Sochol

    Ryan D. Sochol

    University of Maryland

    H-index: 5
    Kevin Korner

    Kevin Korner

    California Institute of Technology

    H-index: 4
    Ben Hightower

    Ben Hightower

    Stanford University

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